Friday, May 26, 2017

Digest for rec.games.trivia@googlegroups.com - 19 updates in 7 topics

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): May 25 11:05PM -0500

These questions were written to be asked in Toronto on 2017-01-30,
and should be interpreted accordingly.
 
On each question you may give up to two answers, but if you give
both a right answer and a wrong answer, there is a small penalty.
Please post all your answers to the newsgroup in a single followup,
based only on your own knowledge. (In your answer posting, quote
the questions and place your answer below each one.) I will reveal
the correct answers in about 3 days.
 
All questions were written by members of 5 Easy Pieces and are
used here by permission, but have been reformatted and may have
been retyped and/or edited by me. For further information see
my 2016-11-26 companion posting on "Questions from the Canadian
Inquisition (QFTCI*)".
 
 
* Game 3, Round 7 - Science - Science TV Series
 
Given the year or years it aired and some clues, name the science
TV series. Complete titles are required in all cases.
 
Questions #1-4 are about series that are still running.
 
1. Since 2010: This series airs on the Science Channel and is
hosted by Morgan Freeman. The episode titles are all questions,
with the most recent being "Can We All Become Geniuses?"
 
2. Since 1964: This BBC program is the longest-running science
series worldwide. Most episodes are documentaries on a specific
topic. Paul Vaughan hosted 135 episodes from 1968 to 2013.
 
3. Since 1974: This PBS science documentary series is the US answer
to <answer 2>, and in fact it often airs re-narrated <answer 2>
episodes. Jay O. Sanders has narrated the most episodes at 55.
 
4. Since 2001: This Canadian series, though not exactly a science
series, sheds light on the manufacturing process of various
household objects. The narrator generally has at least one
terrible pun per episode.
 
The remaining series are no longer in production.
 
5. 2003-16: Arguably the most popular science TV series, it starred
Adam Savage and Jamie Hyneman, who put urban legends and popular
beliefs to real-world tests. Explosions were usually involved.
 
6. 1993-98: Hosted by everyone's favorite bow-tied engineer, this
series inspired kids of all ages. There was a goofy science
music video at the end of every episode.
 
7. 1980 and 2014: The original 13-episode series was rebooted
in 2014 by executive producers Seth MacFarlane and Ann Druyan,
the wife of the original narrator. Name the series.
 
8. 1978, 1994, and 1997: This scientific history series, originally
produced for the BBC, had James Burke as the narrator, exploring
how one invention led to the development of the next from ancient
times to the present. The later seasons were produced by TLC.
 
9. 2006: This groundbreaking BBC series, hosted by David
Attenborough, was the first BBC program to be shot in high
definition and the most expensive ever commissioned by
the network. Parts of this series were also released as a
documentary film in 2007.
 
10. 2009: A follow-up of sorts to <answer 9>, in this series David
Attenborough leads us on a 10-episode journey of evolution and
animal behavior. BBC-produced, it aired on Discovery Channel US
in 2010, with Oprah Winfrey replacing David Attenborough as
narrator.
 
 
* Game 3, Round 8 - Entertainment - Worst Movies of 2016
 
Hollywood likes to congratulate itself on its many excesses that
strike big, but what about the wretched pile that forms the bottom?
Here are 10 movies that were universally reviled and will find
their final resting place at the Razzies.
 
In each case, name the movie.
 
Naturally, we will start with sequels.
 
1. A so-called satire of the fashion industry, the first movie in
this series had a following, but this putrid Ben Stiller vehicle
appeared 15 years after the original.
 
2. 20 years after the original special-effects-laden movie featuring
aliens attacking world monuments made its money-making
appearance, this sequel, described as coarse and stupid, came
and flopped.
 
3. This Tom Hanks feature was directed by Ron Howard and based on
a Dan Brown novel. That sounds like "The Da Vinci Code", but
it's not that movie, it's a sequel, and it died a fitting death
at the box office.
 
4. After his terrible performance in 2015's "Mortdecai", Johnny
Depp, fresh from his marital split, embarked on this bloated
sequel to his movie from 2010. Go ask Johnny.
 
5. The third and last book in the "Divergent" series got made into
a movie and nobody went.
 
And now, some *original* bad movies.
 
6. Sacha Baron Cohen presents another so-called comedy, about
a soccer hooligan who reunites with his brother, an MI6 spy.
It's scatological, humorless, and mean-spirited.
 
7. Hard to believe this universally reviled comedy starring Robert
De Niro as a senior who goes to spring break with his grandson
actually made money. Do people really want to see great actors
humiliate themselves for a paycheck?
 
8. It's enough to make you break out in hives when reading about it.
Will Smith plays a dad who loses his daughter and starts writing
letters to Love, Death, and Time. We're not kidding!
 
9. Ewan McGregor directed and starred in this adaptation of a
Philip Roth novel. It was described as earnest, pretentious,
badly acted, boring, etc.
 
10. This historical fantasy/action film stars Gerard Butler.
It was a sand-and-sandals epic with bad special effects, cheesy
characters, and a big studio write-down.
 
--
Mark Brader | And the customary practice seems to be "FIRST,
Toronto | let the cat out of the bag; THEN inform you
msb@vex.net | that there's a cat and a bag." --Daniel P.B. Smith
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
Calvin <334152@gmail.com>: May 25 09:15PM -0700

On Friday, May 26, 2017 at 2:05:47 PM UTC+10, Mark Brader wrote:
 
 
> 5. 2003-16: Arguably the most popular science TV series, it starred
> Adam Savage and Jamie Hyneman, who put urban legends and popular
> beliefs to real-world tests. Explosions were usually involved.
 
Mythbusters
 
> definition and the most expensive ever commissioned by
> the network. Parts of this series were also released as a
> documentary film in 2007.
 
Life on Earth
 
 
> 1. A so-called satire of the fashion industry, the first movie in
> this series had a following, but this putrid Ben Stiller vehicle
> appeared 15 years after the original.
 
Zoolander II

> aliens attacking world monuments made its money-making
> appearance, this sequel, described as coarse and stupid, came
> and flopped.
 
Independence Day II
 
> a Dan Brown novel. That sounds like "The Da Vinci Code", but
> it's not that movie, it's a sequel, and it died a fitting death
> at the box office.
 
Angels and Demons
 
 
> 9. Ewan McGregor directed and starred in this adaptation of a
> Philip Roth novel. It was described as earnest, pretentious,
> badly acted, boring, etc.
 
Portnoy's Complaint
 
> 10. This historical fantasy/action film stars Gerard Butler.
> It was a sand-and-sandals epic with bad special effects, cheesy
> characters, and a big studio write-down.
 
 
cheers,
calvin
Dan Tilque <dtilque@frontier.com>: May 25 10:03PM -0700

Mark Brader wrote:
 
> 3. Since 1974: This PBS science documentary series is the US answer
> to <answer 2>, and in fact it often airs re-narrated <answer 2>
> episodes. Jay O. Sanders has narrated the most episodes at 55.
 
Nova
 
 
> 5. 2003-16: Arguably the most popular science TV series, it starred
> Adam Savage and Jamie Hyneman, who put urban legends and popular
> beliefs to real-world tests. Explosions were usually involved.
 
Mythbusters
 
 
> 7. 1980 and 2014: The original 13-episode series was rebooted
> in 2014 by executive producers Seth MacFarlane and Ann Druyan,
> the wife of the original narrator. Name the series.
 
Cosmos
 
> produced for the BBC, had James Burke as the narrator, exploring
> how one invention led to the development of the next from ancient
> times to the present. The later seasons were produced by TLC.
 
Connections
 
> definition and the most expensive ever commissioned by
> the network. Parts of this series were also released as a
> documentary film in 2007.
 
Life on Earth
 
 
--
Dan Tilque
Joshua Kreitzer <gromit82@hotmail.com>: May 26 05:03AM

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote in news:4ICdnckJuLYLNLrEnZ2dnUU7-
 
> 1. Since 2010: This series airs on the Science Channel and is
> hosted by Morgan Freeman. The episode titles are all questions,
> with the most recent being "Can We All Become Geniuses?"
 
"Into the Wormhole"
 
> 3. Since 1974: This PBS science documentary series is the US answer
> to <answer 2>, and in fact it often airs re-narrated <answer 2>
> episodes. Jay O. Sanders has narrated the most episodes at 55.
 
"Nova"

> 5. 2003-16: Arguably the most popular science TV series, it starred
> Adam Savage and Jamie Hyneman, who put urban legends and popular
> beliefs to real-world tests. Explosions were usually involved.
 
"Mythbusters"

> 6. 1993-98: Hosted by everyone's favorite bow-tied engineer, this
> series inspired kids of all ages. There was a goofy science
> music video at the end of every episode.
 
"Bill Nye the Science Guy"
 
> 7. 1980 and 2014: The original 13-episode series was rebooted
> in 2014 by executive producers Seth MacFarlane and Ann Druyan,
> the wife of the original narrator. Name the series.
 
"Cosmos"

> definition and the most expensive ever commissioned by
> the network. Parts of this series were also released as a
> documentary film in 2007.
 
"Planet Earth"

 
> 1. A so-called satire of the fashion industry, the first movie in
> this series had a following, but this putrid Ben Stiller vehicle
> appeared 15 years after the original.
 
"Zoolander 2"
 
> aliens attacking world monuments made its money-making
> appearance, this sequel, described as coarse and stupid, came
> and flopped.
 
"Independence Day 2"

> a Dan Brown novel. That sounds like "The Da Vinci Code", but
> it's not that movie, it's a sequel, and it died a fitting death
> at the box office.
 
"Inferno"
 
> 4. After his terrible performance in 2015's "Mortdecai", Johnny
> Depp, fresh from his marital split, embarked on this bloated
> sequel to his movie from 2010. Go ask Johnny.
 
"Alice Through the Looking Glass"

> 5. The third and last book in the "Divergent" series got made into
> a movie and nobody went.
 
"Insurgent"
 
 
> 6. Sacha Baron Cohen presents another so-called comedy, about
> a soccer hooligan who reunites with his brother, an MI6 spy.
> It's scatological, humorless, and mean-spirited.
 
"The Brothers Grimsby"
 
> De Niro as a senior who goes to spring break with his grandson
> actually made money. Do people really want to see great actors
> humiliate themselves for a paycheck?
 
"Dirty Grandpa"

--
Joshua Kreitzer
gromit82@hotmail.com
"Peter Smyth" <smythp@gmail.com>: May 26 08:21AM

Mark Brader wrote:
 
 
> 2. Since 1964: This BBC program is the longest-running science
> series worldwide. Most episodes are documentaries on a specific
> topic. Paul Vaughan hosted 135 episodes from 1968 to 2013.
Horizon
 
> 5. 2003-16: Arguably the most popular science TV series, it starred
> Adam Savage and Jamie Hyneman, who put urban legends and popular
> beliefs to real-world tests. Explosions were usually involved.
Mythbusters
> definition and the most expensive ever commissioned by
> the network. Parts of this series were also released as a
> documentary film in 2007.
Planet Earth
> animal behavior. BBC-produced, it aired on Discovery Channel US
> in 2010, with Oprah Winfrey replacing David Attenborough as
> narrator.
Life
> a Dan Brown novel. That sounds like "The Da Vinci Code", but
> it's not that movie, it's a sequel, and it died a fitting death
> at the box office.
Angels and Demons
 
> 10. This historical fantasy/action film stars Gerard Butler.
> It was a sand-and-sandals epic with bad special effects, cheesy
> characters, and a big studio write-down.
 
 
 
Peter Smyth
"Peter Smyth" <smythp@gmail.com>: May 25 12:15PM

Calvin wrote:
 
> 1 Who was the American President when man first walked on the moon?
Richard Nixon
 
> 2 Passing thought China, India and Bangladesh, what is the tenth
> largest river in the world (by water flow)?
Ganges

> 3 Which Frenchwoman is currently managing director of the
> International Monetary Fund?
Christine Lagarde
 
> 4 What, according to Charles M Schultz, constitutes happiness?
A cigar called Hamlet

> 5 Name any of the 3 Shakespeare plays in which Sir John Falstaff
> appears.
Merry Wives of Windsor
 
> 6 What does an upside-down flag traditionally signal?
Distress

> armadillo lack that virtually all other mammals possess?
 

> 8 What fictional substance is also the tile of a 1997 remake of the
> 1961 film "The Absent-Minded Professor"?
Unobtainium

> 9 Extending from the lumbar to the back to the thighs, which is the
> longest nerve in the human body?
Spinal nerve
 
> 10 Which 1988 Tim Burton comedy fantasy film won the best makeup
> Oscar in 1989?
Edward scissorhands
 
Peter Smyth
tool@panix.com (Dan Blum): May 25 12:24PM


> 1 Who was the American President when man first walked on the moon?
 
Nixon
 
> 2 Passing thought China, India and Bangladesh, what is the tenth largest river in the world (by water flow)?
 
Brahmaputra
 
> 4 What, according to Charles M Schultz, constitutes happiness?
 
a warm puppy
 
> 5 Name any of the 3 Shakespeare plays in which Sir John Falstaff appears.
 
Henry IV Part I
 
> 6 What does an upside-down flag traditionally signal?
 
distress
 
> 7 What physical feature do anteaters such as the echidna and armadillo lack that virtually all other mammals possess?
 
teeth
 
> 8 What fictional substance is also the tile of a 1997 remake of the 1961 film "The Absent-Minded Professor"?
 
flubber
 
> 9 Extending from the lumbar to the back to the thighs, which is the longest nerve in the human body?
 
sciatic
 
> 10 Which 1988 Tim Burton comedy fantasy film won the best makeup Oscar in 1989?
 
Beetlejuice
 
--
_______________________________________________________________________
Dan Blum tool@panix.com
"I wouldn't have believed it myself if I hadn't just made it up."
Bruce <bbowler@bigelow.org>: May 25 07:55PM

On Wed, 24 May 2017 23:05:37 -0700, Calvin wrote:
 
> My apologies RGTers. I went to mark this quiz only to discover I hadn't
> posted it!
 
> 1 Who was the American President when man first walked on the moon?
 
Nixon?
 
> 2 Passing thought China, India and Bangladesh, what is the tenth
largest
> river in the world (by water flow)?
> 3 Which Frenchwoman is currently managing director of the
International
> Monetary Fund?
> 4 What, according to Charles M Schultz, constitutes happiness?
 
A warm puppy
 
> 5 Name any of the 3 Shakespeare plays in which Sir John Falstaff
> appears.
> 6 What does an upside-down flag traditionally signal?
 
Distress
 
> 7 What physical feature do anteaters such as the echidna and
armadillo
> lack that virtually all other mammals possess?
> 8 What fictional substance is also the tile of a 1997 remake of the
1961
> film "The Absent-Minded Professor"?
 
Flubber
 
> 9 Extending from the lumbar to the
> back to the thighs, which is the longest nerve in the human body?
 
Sciatic
 
> 10 Which 1988 Tim Burton comedy fantasy film won the best makeup Oscar
> in 1989?
 
Beetlejuice
swp <stephen.w.perry@gmail.com>: May 25 05:25PM -0700

On Thursday, May 25, 2017 at 4:20:04 AM UTC-4, Mark Brader wrote:
> > posted it!
 
> I had a similar reaction when checking to see if there'd been any quick
> responses to MSBKO6 Round 10!
 
well, for certain values of 'quick'
 
 
> > 7 What physical feature do anteaters such as the echidna and armadillo
> > lack that virtually all other mammals possess?
 
> Scaly armor.
 
*snort!*
 
> Toronto | Instead of sacrificing sheep, you sacrifice sleep."
> msb@vex.net | -- John Cramer
 
> My text in this article is in the public domain.
 
swp, who resembles that last remark
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): May 25 11:08PM -0500

"Calvin":
>>> 7 What physical feature do anteaters such as the echidna and armadillo
>>> lack that virtually all other mammals possess?
 
Mark Brader:
>> Scaly armor.
 
Stephen Perry:
> *snort!*
 
Arrgh.
--
Mark Brader "Succeed, and you'll be remembered for a very long time.
Toronto Fail, and you'll be remembered even longer."
msb@vex.net -- Hel Faczel (John Barnes: ...the Martian King)
swp <stephen.w.perry@gmail.com>: May 25 05:20PM -0700

On Wednesday, May 24, 2017 at 2:25:39 AM UTC-4, Mark Brader wrote:
> Mark Brader:
> > 10. What is the value of the (universal) gravitational constant?
 
> Stephen Perry 0.00000000006066 m³/kg s² /1.100
 
heh. didn't see the extra "0" in my answer. thought I typed in "6.66" and then wagged the exponent.
 
> Toronto | although that would be a huge admission of failure on your part."
> msb@vex.net | --Veronica, "Better Off Ted" (Becky Mann & Audra Sielaff)
 
> My text in this article is in the public domain.
 
thank you.
 
I also claim "largest error margin on a question" for anyone winning a contest done in this manner.
 
swp
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): May 25 11:07PM -0500

Stephen Perry:
> didn't see the extra "0" in my answer. thought I typed in "6.66"
> and then wagged the exponent.
 
Well, well wagged.
--
Mark Brader, Toronto "No victor believes in chance."
msb@vex.net -- Nietzsche (trans. Kaufmann)
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): May 25 10:54PM -0500

Mark Brader:
 
> * Game 3, Round 4 - Geography - Eponymous Airports
 
> In each case, name the major city that the airport serves.
 
> 1. George Bush Intercontinental Airport.
 
Houston. 4 for Joshua, Dan Blum, Marc, Peter, Jason, and Dan Tilque.
3 for Calvin.
 
> 2. Robert L. Stanfield International Airport.
 
Halifax.
 
> 3. Norman Manley International Airport.
 
Kingston, Jamaica. 4 for Joshua and Marc.
 
> 4. Frédéric Chopin International Airport.
 
Warsaw. 4 for Joshua, Dan Blum, Marc, Peter, Erland, and Jason.
3 for Calvin.
 
> 5. Nikola Tesla International Airport.
 
Belgrade. 4 for Erland and Dan Tilque.
 
> 6. Franz Josef Strauss International Airport.
 
Munich. 4 for Erland.
 
> 7. Benito Juárez International Airport.
 
Mexico City. 4 for Joshua, Dan Blum, Peter, and Erland.
 
> 8. Louis Armstrong International Airport.
 
New Orleans. 4 for everyone -- Joshua, Calvin, Dan Blum, Marc,
Peter, Erland, Jason, and Dan Tilque.
 
> 9. Ferenc Liszt International Airport.
 
Budapest. 4 for Joshua, Dan Blum, Peter, Erland, and Dan Tilque.
3 for Calvin.
 
> 10. Václav Havel International Airport.
 
Prague. 4 for Joshua, Dan Blum, Marc, Peter, Erland, Jason,
and Dan Tilque. 3 for Calvin.
 
 
> only after they died. Not today. Today many artists get millions
> of dollars for their work while they're alive. (Whether it's any
> good is another story.) In each case, name the artist.
 
This was the hardest round in the original game and was tied for
second-hardest of the entire season.
 
> skull "For the Love of God", which sold for $77,900,00 in 2007.
> Other works include various sharks in formaldehyde and medicine
> cabinets.
 
Damien Hirst. 4 for Joshua, Calvin, and Peter.
 
> 2. This sculptor, born in 1955, is known for his balloon dogs
> made of stainless steel. One sold for $58,400,000.
> His estimated worth is $500,000,000.
 
Jeff Koons. 4 for Calvin and Dan Blum.
 
> are similar to Francis Bacon's. When he visited California,
> where he eventually settled, he produced a series of realistic
> paintings of swimming pools. His estimated worth is $40,000,000.
 
David Hockney. 4 for Joshua, Dan Blum, and Peter.
 
> and "capitalist realism", he set the record of £21,000,000 for
> highest auction price in 2012 for a painting. His estimated
> wealth is $40,000,000.
 
Gerhard Richter.
 
> and located in Chicago's Millennium Park, and "Sky Mirror",
> another stainless-steel piece that looks like a satellite dish.
> His estimated worth is $71,000,000.
 
Anish Kapoor. 4 for Joshua and Peter.
 
> 1998 that uses the filthy bed where she drank, slept, smoked,
> ate, and copulated while going through an emotional crisis.
> That piece eventually sold for over £2,500,000.
 
Tracey Emin. 4 for Calvin and Peter.
 
> He is best known for his painting "The Flag", which shows -- you
> guessed it! -- the American flag, in oil and collage on fabric.
> His estimated worth is $300,000,000.
 
Jasper Johns. 4 for Joshua and Calvin.
 
> "Untitled No. 96 (1981) sold for almost $4,000,000, and
> "Untitled No. 153" (1985) went for $2,700,000. Born in 1954,
> she is known for using herself as both the model and subject.
 
Cindy Sherman. 4 for Joshua.
 
> and postmodern painter. In the 1970s, he became famous for his
> upside-down images, which often included birds. His estimated
> worth is $20,000,000.
 
Georg Baselitz.
 
> he was commissioned by Mark Zuckerberg in 2007 to paint murals
> in Facebook's new headquarters and was paid in Facebook stock.
> He is worth an estimated $200,000,000.
 
David Choe.
 
 
GAME 3 ROUNDS-> 2 3 4 6 TOTALS
TOPICS-> Can Spo Geo Art
Joshua Kreitzer 6 0 28 20 54
Peter Smyth -- -- 24 16 40
Dan Blum 5 0 24 8 37
"Calvin" -- -- 16 16 32
Erland Sommarskog -- -- 28 0 28
Marc Dashevsky 0 0 20 0 20
Dan Tilque -- -- 20 0 20
Jason Kreitzer 0 4 16 0 20
 
--
Mark Brader | "Have you got anything without Spam in it?"
Toronto | "Well, there's Spam, egg, sausage, and Spam.
msb@vex.net | That's not got *much* Spam in it." --Monty Python
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
Marc Dashevsky <usenet@MarcDashevsky.com>: May 25 09:28AM -0500

May I ask Dan and Calvin to repost Rotating Quiz #257 and Calvin's Quiz #487, respectively?
Answers are making it to my server but the original quiz posts have not shown up.
 
 
--
Replace "usenet" with "marc" in the e-mail address.
tool@panix.com (Dan Blum): May 25 02:35PM

> May I ask Dan and Calvin to repost Rotating Quiz #257 and Calvin's Quiz #487, respectively?
> Answers are making it to my server but the original quiz posts have not shown up.
 
Done, although I suspect the original will show up eventually.
 
--
_______________________________________________________________________
Dan Blum tool@panix.com
"I wouldn't have believed it myself if I hadn't just made it up."
Calvin <334152@gmail.com>: May 25 06:01PM -0700

On Friday, May 26, 2017 at 12:35:29 AM UTC+10, Dan Blum wrote:
> > May I ask Dan and Calvin to repost Rotating Quiz #257 and Calvin's Quiz #487, respectively?
> > Answers are making it to my server but the original quiz posts have not shown up.
 
> Done, although I suspect the original will show up eventually.
 
Ditto.
 
cheers,
calvin
Calvin <334152@gmail.com>: May 25 06:01PM -0700

1 Who was the American President when man first walked on the moon?
2 Passing thought China, India and Bangladesh, what is the tenth largest river in the world (by water flow)?
3 Which Frenchwoman is currently managing director of the International Monetary Fund?
4 What, according to Charles M Schultz, constitutes happiness?
5 Name any of the 3 Shakespeare plays in which Sir John Falstaff appears.
6 What does an upside-down flag traditionally signal?
7 What physical feature do anteaters such as the echidna and armadillo lack that virtually all other mammals possess?
8 What fictional substance is also the tile of a 1997 remake of the 1961 film "The Absent-Minded Professor"?
9 Extending from the lumbar to the back to the thighs, which is the longest nerve in the human body?
10 Which 1988 Tim Burton comedy fantasy film won the best makeup Oscar in 1989?
 
cheers,
calvin
tool@panix.com (Dan Blum): May 25 02:34PM

NOTE: This is a repost by request. You can answer here or in the original
thread.
 
This is Rotating Quiz #257. Entries must be posted by Tuesday,
May 30th, 2017 at 11 PM (Eastern Daylight Time).
 
Usual rules: no looking anything up, no discussion, etc. The winner
gets to create the next RQ.
 
Please post your answers to all questions in a single followup in the
newsgroup, quoting the questions and placing your answer below each
one. Only one answer is allowed per question.
 
This quiz has a theme but since it should be obvious it does not
affect the scoring, which is 1 point per question; for this quiz I am
not going to deduct for misspellings as long as I can be sure what was
meant. If the answer is a person's name only the surname is required
unless the person is commonly known by a single name, in which case
that is sufficient. If any other part of the name is given (the first
name for most people, the surname for others) it must be correct for
the answer to score.
 
In case of a tie, the first tiebreaker will be whoever scored the most
points on the hardest questions (defined post-facto as the ones which
the fewest people got any points on). Second tiebreaker will be
posting order.
 
1. Not much of note happened in 257 (that we have a record of, at
least), but one thing that might have is the birth of Saint Gregory
the Illuminator. He is credited with converting his native country to
Christianity and is its patron saint. This country was the first to
officially adopt Christianity: name it.
 
Please decode the rot13 for questions 2-10 only after answering
question 1.
 
2. Guvf Fbivrg pbzcbfre vf orfg xabja sbe uvf onyyrgf Tnlnar naq
Fcnegnphf, va cnegvphyne n zbirzrag yngr va gur sbezre jurer gur
qnapref cresbez jvgu fjbeqf.
 
3. Guvf Fbivrg nvepensg qrfvtare cnegarerq jvgu Zvxunvy Therivpu gb
sbez n qrfvta ohernh; gur ohernh jnf anzrq sbe gurz ohg jnf trarenyyl
xabja nf "ZvT."
 
4. Guvf fvatre-fbatjevgre jnf obea va Rtlcg ohg zbirq gb Pnanqn nf n
puvyq. Ur unf unq n irel fhpprffshy pnerre nf n puvyqera'f
ragregnvare, jvgu fbatf fhpu nf "Onanancubar" naq "Onol Oryhtn." Ur vf
nyfb na raivebazrag npgvivfg naq ehaf gur Pragre sbe Puvyq Ubabhevat.
 
5. Guvf Nzrevpna npgerff jnf bar bs gur bevtvany pnfg bs FPGI. Fur unf
nyfb qbar pbafvqrenoyr svyz jbex (zbfg erpragyl va Zl Ovt Sng Terrx
Jrqqvat 2) naq fgntr jbex; fur unf zber Gbal abzvangvbaf sbe Srngherq
Npgerff va n Zhfvpny guna nalbar ryfr naq unf jba gjvpr, sbe Zl
Snibevgr Lrne naq Cvccva. (Abj jr frr jub jnf cnlvat nggragvba gur
bgure jrrx.)
 
6. Guvf Nzrevpna cnvagre jnf sebz jurer lbh fubhyq rkcrpg, ohg nsgre
neevivat va gur HF punatrq uvf anzr naq pynvzrq gb or eryngrq gb n
snzbhf Ehffvna jevgre. Uvf rneyl jbex jnf urnivyl vasyhraprq ol
Prmnaar ohg ur yngre qnooyrq jvgu phovfz naq orpnzr n fheernyvfg; ur
jnf tbbq sevraqf jvgu Naqer Oergba naq bar bs uvf zbfg snzbhf (naq
ynetrfg) cnvagvatf, Gur Yvire vf gur Pbpx'f Pbzo, jnf qvfcynlrq ng gur
Fheernyvfg'f ynfg fubj. Ur pbzzvggrq fhvpvqr va 1948.
 
7. Guvf Pnanqvna vf orfg xabja nf n svyz qverpgbe. Nzbat uvf svyzf ner
Gur Fjrrg Urernsgre, Puybr (uvf uvturfg-tebffvat svyz), Gur Pncgvir,
Neneng, naq Sryvpvn'f Wbhearl.
 
8. Guvf Nzrevpna nhgube jebgr znal obbxf, fgbevrf, naq cynlf. Uvf
orfg-xabja cynl vf cebonoyl Gur Gvzr bs Lbhe Yvsr, juvpu jba gur 1939
Chyvgmre sbe qenzn naq jnf yngre znqr vagb n zbir fgneevat Wnzrf
Pntarl. Uvf abiry Gur Uhzna Pbzrql jnf bevtvanyyl n fperracynl naq jnf
va snpg znqr nf n zbivr fgneevat Zvpxrl Ebbarl; <nafjre 8> jba gur
Bfpne sbe orfg fgbel sbe guvf.
 
9. Guvf Nzrevpna fvatre naq npgerff bevtvanyyl orpnzr cbchyne nf cneg
bs n qhb jvgu ure gura-uhfonaq ohg unf orra sylvat fbyb fvapr
1975. Fur fgnegrq ure npgvat pnerre va 1982 naq qvq zbfg bs ure orfg
npgvat jbex va gur 80f, vapyhqvat jvaavat na Bfpne. Fur nyfb unf na
Rzzl naq n Tenzzl.
 
10. Guvf Pnanqvna jnf bar bs gur orfg-xabja cbegenvg cubgbtencuref bs
gur 20gu praghel. Cbffvoyl uvf zbfg snzbhf jbex jnf uvf 1941 cvpgher
bs Jvafgba Puhepuvyy ba gur pbire bs Yvsr, ohg ur nyfb cubgbtencurq 50
bguref bs gur zbfg 100 vasyhragvny crbcyr bs gur 20gu praghel,
nppbeqvat gb Vagreangvbany Jub'f Jub. (Naq ur jnf ba gur yvfg
uvzfrys.)
 
 
--
_______________________________________________________________________
Dan Blum tool@panix.com
"I wouldn't have believed it myself if I hadn't just made it up."
Marc Dashevsky <usenet@MarcDashevsky.com>: May 25 11:18AM -0500

In article <og6q2j$b4i$1@reader1.panix.com>, tool@panix.com says...
> the Illuminator. He is credited with converting his native country to
> Christianity and is its patron saint. This country was the first to
> officially adopt Christianity: name it.
Armenia
 
> child. He has had a very successful career as a children's
> entertainer, with songs such as "Bananaphone" and "Baby Beluga." He is
> also an environment activist and runs the Center for Child Honouring.
Raffi
 
> Actress in a Musical than anyone else and has won twice, for My
> Favorite Year and Pippin. (Now we see who was paying attention the
> other week.)
Andrea Martin
 
> 7. This Canadian is best known as a film director. Among his films are
> The Sweet Hereafter, Chloe (his highest-grossing film), The Captive,
> Ararat, and Felicia's Journey.
Atom Egoyan
 
> 1975. She started her acting career in 1982 and did most of her best
> acting work in the 80s, including winning an Oscar. She also has an
> Emmy and a Grammy.
Cher
 
 
--
Replace "usenet" with "marc" in the e-mail address.
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Thursday, May 25, 2017

Digest for rec.games.trivia@googlegroups.com - 8 updates in 2 topics

Calvin <334152@gmail.com>: May 24 11:05PM -0700

My apologies RGTers. I went to mark this quiz only to discover I hadn't posted it!
 
1 Who was the American President when man first walked on the moon?
2 Passing thought China, India and Bangladesh, what is the tenth largest river in the world (by water flow)?
3 Which Frenchwoman is currently managing director of the International Monetary Fund?
4 What, according to Charles M Schultz, constitutes happiness?
5 Name any of the 3 Shakespeare plays in which Sir John Falstaff appears.
6 What does an upside-down flag traditionally signal?
7 What physical feature do anteaters such as the echidna and armadillo lack that virtually all other mammals possess?
8 What fictional substance is also the tile of a 1997 remake of the 1961 film "The Absent-Minded Professor"?
9 Extending from the lumbar to the back to the thighs, which is the longest nerve in the human body?
10 Which 1988 Tim Burton comedy fantasy film won the best makeup Oscar in 1989?
 
cheers,
calvin
Gareth Owen <gwowen@gmail.com>: May 25 07:25AM +0100


> My apologies RGTers. I went to mark this quiz only to discover I
> hadn't posted it!
 
> 1 Who was the American President when man first walked on the moon?
 
Nixon
 
> 2 Passing thought China, India and Bangladesh, what is the tenth
> largest river in the world (by water flow)?
 
Ganges
 
> 3 Which Frenchwoman is currently managing director of the
> International Monetary Fund?
 
I can see her face in my mind, but the name ain't coming
 
> 4 What, according to Charles M Schultz, constitutes happiness?
 
Never Having To Say You're Sorry
 
> 5 Name any of the 3 Shakespeare plays in which Sir John Falstaff
> appears.
 
Henry V
 
> 6 What does an upside-down flag traditionally signal?
 
Distress
 
> 7 What physical feature do anteaters such as the echidna and armadillo
> lack that virtually all other mammals possess?
 
A Smartphone
 
> 8 What fictional substance is also the tile of a 1997 remake of the
> 1961 film "The Absent-Minded Professor"?
 
Flubber!
 
> 9 Extending from the lumbar to the back to the thighs, which is the
> longest nerve in the human body?
 
Ulnar?
 
> 10 Which 1988 Tim Burton comedy fantasy film won the best makeup Oscar
> in 1989?
 
Beetlejuice?
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): May 25 03:19AM -0500

"Calvin":
> My apologies RGTers. I went to mark this quiz only to discover I hadn't
> posted it!
 
I had a similar reaction when checking to see if there'd been any quick
responses to MSBKO6 Round 10!

> 1 Who was the American President when man first walked on the moon?
 
Nixon.
 
> 2 Passing thought China, India and Bangladesh, what is the tenth largest
> river in the world (by water flow)?
 
Ganges. Nice typo there.
 
> 3 Which Frenchwoman is currently managing director of the International
> Monetary Fund?
 
L'Argent. :-)
 
> 4 What, according to Charles M Schultz, constitutes happiness?
 
A warm puppy.
 
> 5 Name any of the 3 Shakespeare plays in which Sir John Falstaff appears.
 
Oh dear. I think they're some of the Henry IV-VI plays, but which ones
are in how many parts? I'll try "Henry V" with no part number.
 
> 6 What does an upside-down flag traditionally signal?
 
Distress. Or so it is claimed, but you know, there are quite a lot of
flags out there that when inverted either look the same (e.g. France),
or almost the same (e.g. UK), or like the flag of another country (e.g.
Indonesia). So...
 
> 7 What physical feature do anteaters such as the echidna and armadillo
> lack that virtually all other mammals possess?
 
Scaly armor.
 
> 8 What fictional substance is also the tile of a 1997 remake of the 1961
> film "The Absent-Minded Professor"?
 
Flubber.
 
> 9 Extending from the lumbar to the back to the thighs, which is the
> longest nerve in the human body?
 
Sciatic.
 
> 10 Which 1988 Tim Burton comedy fantasy film won the best makeup Oscar in 1989?
 
"Beetlejuice".
--
Mark Brader | "You guys have your own pagan religion...
Toronto | Instead of sacrificing sheep, you sacrifice sleep."
msb@vex.net | -- John Cramer
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
Erland Sommarskog <esquel@sommarskog.se>: May 25 11:40AM +0200

> 1 Who was the American President when man first walked on the moon?
 
Richard Millhouse Nixon
 
> 2 Passing thought China, India and Bangladesh, what is the tenth
> largest river in the world (by water flow)?
 
Ganges
 
> 3 Which Frenchwoman is currently managing director of the
> International Monetary Fund?
 
Christine Lagarde
 
> 5 Name any of the 3 Shakespeare plays in which Sir John Falstaff
> appears.
 
Twelth Night
 
> 6 What does an upside-down flag traditionally signal?
 
Oh what a party we had last night!
 
 
--
Erland Sommarskog, Stockholm, esquel@sommarskog.se
Dan Tilque <dtilque@frontier.com>: May 25 02:43AM -0700

Calvin wrote:
> My apologies RGTers. I went to mark this quiz only to discover I hadn't posted it!
 
> 1 Who was the American President when man first walked on the moon?
 
Nixon
 
> 2 Passing thought China, India and Bangladesh, what is the tenth largest river in the world (by water flow)?
 
Ganges
 
> 3 Which Frenchwoman is currently managing director of the International Monetary Fund?
> 4 What, according to Charles M Schultz, constitutes happiness?
 
a warm puppy
 
> 5 Name any of the 3 Shakespeare plays in which Sir John Falstaff appears.
 
Henry IV, part 2
 
> 6 What does an upside-down flag traditionally signal?
 
emergency
 
> 7 What physical feature do anteaters such as the echidna and armadillo lack that virtually all other mammals possess?
 
teeth
 
> 8 What fictional substance is also the tile of a 1997 remake of the 1961 film "The Absent-Minded Professor"?
 
flubber
 
> 9 Extending from the lumbar to the back to the thighs, which is the longest nerve in the human body?
 
spinal cord
 
 
--
Dan Tilque
"Peter Smyth" <smythp@gmail.com>: May 24 12:25PM

Dan Blum wrote:
 
> the Illuminator. He is credited with converting his native country to
> Christianity and is its patron saint. This country was the first to
> officially adopt Christianity: name it.
Italy
 
> 2. This Soviet composer is best known for his ballets Gayane and
> Spartacus, in particular a movement late in the former where the
> dancers perform with swords.
Prokofiev
> 1975. She started her acting career in 1982 and did most of her best
> acting work in the 80s, including winning an Oscar. She also has an
> Emmy and a Grammy.
Cher
> others of the most 100 influential people of the 20th century,
> according to International Who's Who. (And he was on the list
> himself.)
 
 
Peter Smyth
Erland Sommarskog <esquel@sommarskog.se>: May 24 08:43PM +0200

> the Illuminator. He is credited with converting his native country to
> Christianity and is its patron saint. This country was the first to
> officially adopt Christianity: name it.
 
Armenia

> 2. Guvf Fbivrg pbzcbfre vf orfg xabja sbe uvf onyyrgf Tnlnar naq
> Fcnegnphf, va cnegvphyne n zbirzrag yngr va gur sbezre jurer gur
> qnapref cresbez jvgu fjbeqf.
 
Korchakov

> 3. Guvf Fbivrg nvepensg qrfvtare cnegarerq jvgu Zvxunvy Therivpu gb
> sbez n qrfvta ohernh; gur ohernh jnf anzrq sbe gurz ohg jnf trarenyyl
> xabja nf "ZvT."
 
Tupolev

> jnf tbbq sevraqf jvgu Naqer Oergba naq bar bs uvf zbfg snzbhf (naq
> ynetrfg) cnvagvatf, Gur Yvire vf gur Pbpx'f Pbzo, jnf qvfcynlrq ng gur
> Fheernyvfg'f ynfg fubj. Ur pbzzvggrq fhvpvqr va 1948.
 
Kandinsky
 
> 7. Guvf Pnanqvna vf orfg xabja nf n svyz qverpgbe. Nzbat uvf svyzf ner
> Gur Fjrrg Urernsgre, Puybr (uvf uvturfg-tebffvat svyz), Gur Pncgvir,
> Neneng, naq Sryvpvn'f Wbhearl.
 
Atom Egoyan

> 1975. Fur fgnegrq ure npgvat pnerre va 1982 naq qvq zbfg bs ure orfg
> npgvat jbex va gur 80f, vapyhqvat jvaavat na Bfpne. Fur nyfb unf na
> Rzzl naq n Tenzzl.
 
Tina Turner

 
 
 
--
Erland Sommarskog, Stockholm, esquel@sommarskog.se
Calvin <334152@gmail.com>: May 24 06:59PM -0700

On Wednesday, May 24, 2017 at 2:04:04 PM UTC+10, Dan Blum wrote:
 
> the Illuminator. He is credited with converting his native country to
> Christianity and is its patron saint. This country was the first to
> officially adopt Christianity: name it.
 
Russia
 
> Npgerff va n Zhfvpny guna nalbar ryfr naq unf jba gjvpr, sbe Zl
> Snibevgr Lrne naq Cvccva. (Abj jr frr jub jnf cnlvat nggragvba gur
> bgure jrrx.)
 
Foster?
 
> 1975. Fur fgnegrq ure npgvat pnerre va 1982 naq qvq zbfg bs ure orfg
> npgvat jbex va gur 80f, vapyhqvat jvaavat na Bfpne. Fur nyfb unf na
> Rzzl naq n Tenzzl.
 
Cher?
 
> bguref bs gur zbfg 100 vasyhragvny crbcyr bs gur 20gu praghel,
> nppbeqvat gb Vagreangvbany Jub'f Jub. (Naq ur jnf ba gur yvfg
> uvzfrys.)
 
Kirkland?
 
Too tough for me :-(
 
cheers,
calvin
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Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Digest for rec.games.trivia@googlegroups.com - 17 updates in 3 topics

Bruce <bbowler@bigelow.org>: May 23 01:48PM

On Mon, 22 May 2017 13:13:09 -0500, Mark Brader wrote:
 
> 8. What is the speed of light in vacuum?
 
186,000 miles/second
swp <stephen.w.perry@gmail.com>: May 23 01:19PM -0700

299,800,000 meters per second
 
swp, over the lan and through the firewalls to msb we go...
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): May 23 04:06PM -0500

Mark Brader:
> 8. What is the speed of light in vacuum?
 
Bruce Bowler 186,000 mi/s /1.0015182637
ArenEss 186,000 mi/s /1.0015182637
Joshua Kreitzer 186,200 mi/s /1.0004425217
 
** CORRECT ** 299,792,458 m/s
 
Stephen Perry 299,800,000 m/s *1.0000251574
 
This was a metrology question because the meter is now defined in
terms of the second and the speed of light, thus making the correct
answer exact by definition.
 
Bruce Bowler, who posted later than the entrant posting as "ArenEss",
is eliminated. This contest is now open only to Joshua Kreitzer,
Stephen Perry, and ArenEss. You have up to 4 days to enter Round 9,
from the time this is posted.
 
 
9. One way to describe the shape of an ellipse, or an ellipsoid of
rotation, is the "flattening factor", which is how much you have
to multiply the *difference between the axes* by in order to
get the length of the major axis. For example, in an ellipse
whose axes are 72 and 90 potrzebies long, the flattening
factor is 5, since 5 в (90 - 72) = 90. A narrower ellipse
has a smaller flattening factor. So, in the WGS84 reference
ellipsoid representing the shape of the Earth, what is the
flattening factor?
 
--
Mark Brader | "It is refreshing to have Republican presidential
Toronto | candidates we can believe about *something*.
msb@vex.net | I believe what Bush says about Dole...
| And... what Dole says about Bush." --Craig B. Leman
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
swp <stephen.w.perry@gmail.com>: May 23 02:43PM -0700

I hope I didn't do this backwards, or misguess on the oceans impact.
 
298 1/4
 
swp
ArenEss <areness1@yahoo.com>: May 23 06:08PM -0500

> has a smaller flattening factor. So, in the WGS84 reference
> ellipsoid representing the shape of the Earth, what is the
> flattening factor?
 
1 / 300
 
ArenEss
Joshua Kreitzer <gromit82@hotmail.com>: May 24 01:57AM

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote in news:-YSdnYu14pftObnEnZ2dnUU7-
> has a smaller flattening factor. So, in the WGS84 reference
> ellipsoid representing the shape of the Earth, what is the
> flattening factor?
 
 
My guess:
1000
 
--
Joshua Kreitzer
gromit82@hotmail.com
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): May 23 11:38PM -0500

Mark Brader:
> has a smaller flattening factor. So, in the WGS84 reference
> ellipsoid representing the shape of the Earth, what is the
> flattening factor?
 
ArenEss 1/300 /89,477.16707
Stephen Perry 298 1/4 /1.0000242198
 
** CORRECT ** 298.257223563
 
Joshua Kreitzer 1,000 *3.352810665
 
See e.g. http://confluence.qps.nl/pages/viewpage.action?pageId=29855173
for the correct answer.
 
The entrant posting as "ArenEss" has apparently eliminated themselves
by misreading the question, with the result that we're down to Joshua
Kreitzer and Stephen Perry for the final round. You have 4 days to
enter, if you need it.
 
 
10. What is the (universal) gravitational constant? (Obviously, I am
not asking for a definition of it!)
 
--
Mark Brader "So the American government went to IBM
Toronto to come up with a data encryption standard
msb@vex.net and they came up with...?" "EBCDIC!"
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): May 23 11:40PM -0500

Mark Brader:
> has a smaller flattening factor. So, in the WGS84 reference
> ellipsoid representing the shape of the Earth, what is the
> flattening factor?
 
ArenEss 1/300 /89,477.16707
Stephen Perry 298 1/4 /1.0000242198
 
** CORRECT ** 298.257223563
 
Joshua Kreitzer 1,000 *3.352810665
 
See e.g. http://confluence.qps.nl/pages/viewpage.action?pageId=29855173
for the correct answer.
 
The entrant posting as "ArenEss" has apparently eliminated themselves
by misreading the question, with the result that we're down to Joshua
Kreitzer and Stephen Perry for the final round. You have 4 days to
enter, if you need it.
 
 
10. What is the (universal) gravitational constant? (Obviously, a
definition of what it means is not what I'm asking for!)
 
--
Mark Brader "So the American government went to IBM
Toronto to come up with a data encryption standard
msb@vex.net and they came up with...?" "EBCDIC!"
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
Joshua Kreitzer <gromit82@hotmail.com>: May 24 05:35AM

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote in news:EpidnUWz1N0mk7jEnZ2dnUU7-
> enter, if you need it.
 
> 10. What is the (universal) gravitational constant? (Obviously, a
> definition of what it means is not what I'm asking for!)
 
Not knowing the unit for this, I'm going to give an answer:
 
9.8 meters per second per second
 
because it's something that I know that does have to do with gravity.
 
--
Joshua Kreitzer
gromit82@hotmail.com
swp <stephen.w.perry@gmail.com>: May 23 10:54PM -0700

On Wednesday, May 24, 2017 at 12:40:32 AM UTC-4, Mark Brader wrote:
> Toronto to come up with a data encryption standard
> msb@vex.net and they came up with...?" "EBCDIC!"
 
> My text in this article is in the public domain.
 
6.066 x 10^-11 meters^3 * kg^-1 * seconds^-2 (the # of the beast, or close to it)
 
swp, who hates coding errors at 1:45am
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): May 24 01:25AM -0500

Mark Brader:
> 10. What is the value of the (universal) gravitational constant?
 
Stephen Perry 0.00000000006066 m³/kg s² /1.100
 
** CORRECT ** 0.0000000000667428 m³/kg s²
 
Joshua Kreitzer 9.8 m/s²
 
For the correct answer see the same source as in the astronomy round.
 
 
In a disappointing finish, this contest has effectively ended with two
consecutive self-disqualifications -- this one by Joshua Kreitzer for
giving an answer with the wrong dimensionality. It likely wouldn't've
mattered anyway, as this was a pretty tough question and STEPHEN PERRY
came nearly within 10% of the correct answer.
 
So hearty congratulations to Stephen, who has stayed the course and wins
this contest!
--
Mark Brader | "If you have any problems, any at all, you come see me...
Toronto | although that would be a huge admission of failure on your part."
msb@vex.net | --Veronica, "Better Off Ted" (Becky Mann & Audra Sielaff)
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
tool@panix.com (Dan Blum): May 24 04:04AM

This is Rotating Quiz #257. Entries must be posted by Tuesday,
May 30th, 2017 at 11 PM (Eastern Daylight Time).
 
Usual rules: no looking anything up, no discussion, etc. The winner
gets to create the next RQ.
 
Please post your answers to all questions in a single followup in the
newsgroup, quoting the questions and placing your answer below each
one. Only one answer is allowed per question.
 
This quiz has a theme but since it should be obvious it does not
affect the scoring, which is 1 point per question; for this quiz I am
not going to deduct for misspellings as long as I can be sure what was
meant. If the answer is a person's name only the surname is required
unless the person is commonly known by a single name, in which case
that is sufficient. If any other part of the name is given (the first
name for most people, the surname for others) it must be correct for
the answer to score.
 
In case of a tie, the first tiebreaker will be whoever scored the most
points on the hardest questions (defined post-facto as the ones which
the fewest people got any points on). Second tiebreaker will be
posting order.
 
1. Not much of note happened in 257 (that we have a record of, at
least), but one thing that might have is the birth of Saint Gregory
the Illuminator. He is credited with converting his native country to
Christianity and is its patron saint. This country was the first to
officially adopt Christianity: name it.
 
Please decode the rot13 for questions 2-10 only after answering
question 1.
 
2. Guvf Fbivrg pbzcbfre vf orfg xabja sbe uvf onyyrgf Tnlnar naq
Fcnegnphf, va cnegvphyne n zbirzrag yngr va gur sbezre jurer gur
qnapref cresbez jvgu fjbeqf.
 
3. Guvf Fbivrg nvepensg qrfvtare cnegarerq jvgu Zvxunvy Therivpu gb
sbez n qrfvta ohernh; gur ohernh jnf anzrq sbe gurz ohg jnf trarenyyl
xabja nf "ZvT."
 
4. Guvf fvatre-fbatjevgre jnf obea va Rtlcg ohg zbirq gb Pnanqn nf n
puvyq. Ur unf unq n irel fhpprffshy pnerre nf n puvyqera'f
ragregnvare, jvgu fbatf fhpu nf "Onanancubar" naq "Onol Oryhtn." Ur vf
nyfb na raivebazrag npgvivfg naq ehaf gur Pragre sbe Puvyq Ubabhevat.
 
5. Guvf Nzrevpna npgerff jnf bar bs gur bevtvany pnfg bs FPGI. Fur unf
nyfb qbar pbafvqrenoyr svyz jbex (zbfg erpragyl va Zl Ovt Sng Terrx
Jrqqvat 2) naq fgntr jbex; fur unf zber Gbal abzvangvbaf sbe Srngherq
Npgerff va n Zhfvpny guna nalbar ryfr naq unf jba gjvpr, sbe Zl
Snibevgr Lrne naq Cvccva. (Abj jr frr jub jnf cnlvat nggragvba gur
bgure jrrx.)
 
6. Guvf Nzrevpna cnvagre jnf sebz jurer lbh fubhyq rkcrpg, ohg nsgre
neevivat va gur HF punatrq uvf anzr naq pynvzrq gb or eryngrq gb n
snzbhf Ehffvna jevgre. Uvf rneyl jbex jnf urnivyl vasyhraprq ol
Prmnaar ohg ur yngre qnooyrq jvgu phovfz naq orpnzr n fheernyvfg; ur
jnf tbbq sevraqf jvgu Naqer Oergba naq bar bs uvf zbfg snzbhf (naq
ynetrfg) cnvagvatf, Gur Yvire vf gur Pbpx'f Pbzo, jnf qvfcynlrq ng gur
Fheernyvfg'f ynfg fubj. Ur pbzzvggrq fhvpvqr va 1948.
 
7. Guvf Pnanqvna vf orfg xabja nf n svyz qverpgbe. Nzbat uvf svyzf ner
Gur Fjrrg Urernsgre, Puybr (uvf uvturfg-tebffvat svyz), Gur Pncgvir,
Neneng, naq Sryvpvn'f Wbhearl.
 
8. Guvf Nzrevpna nhgube jebgr znal obbxf, fgbevrf, naq cynlf. Uvf
orfg-xabja cynl vf cebonoyl Gur Gvzr bs Lbhe Yvsr, juvpu jba gur 1939
Chyvgmre sbe qenzn naq jnf yngre znqr vagb n zbir fgneevat Wnzrf
Pntarl. Uvf abiry Gur Uhzna Pbzrql jnf bevtvanyyl n fperracynl naq jnf
va snpg znqr nf n zbivr fgneevat Zvpxrl Ebbarl; <nafjre 8> jba gur
Bfpne sbe orfg fgbel sbe guvf.
 
9. Guvf Nzrevpna fvatre naq npgerff bevtvanyyl orpnzr cbchyne nf cneg
bs n qhb jvgu ure gura-uhfonaq ohg unf orra sylvat fbyb fvapr
1975. Fur fgnegrq ure npgvat pnerre va 1982 naq qvq zbfg bs ure orfg
npgvat jbex va gur 80f, vapyhqvat jvaavat na Bfpne. Fur nyfb unf na
Rzzl naq n Tenzzl.
 
10. Guvf Pnanqvna jnf bar bs gur orfg-xabja cbegenvg cubgbtencuref bs
gur 20gu praghel. Cbffvoyl uvf zbfg snzbhf jbex jnf uvf 1941 cvpgher
bs Jvafgba Puhepuvyy ba gur pbire bs Yvsr, ohg ur nyfb cubgbtencurq 50
bguref bs gur zbfg 100 vasyhragvny crbcyr bs gur 20gu praghel,
nppbeqvat gb Vagreangvbany Jub'f Jub. (Naq ur jnf ba gur yvfg
uvzfrys.)
 
 
--
_______________________________________________________________________
Dan Blum tool@panix.com
"I wouldn't have believed it myself if I hadn't just made it up."
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): May 23 11:36PM -0500

Dan Blum:
> the Illuminator. He is credited with converting his native country to
> Christianity and is its patron saint. This country was the first to
> officially adopt Christianity: name it.
 
Oh, my. This has to be somewhere near the Mediterranean, but what
areas near the Mediterranean would even have been "countries" then
as opposed to parts of the Roman Empire? And it certain wasn't the
Empire itself.
 
Well, I don't have a good guess, so I'll say Cyprus.
 
< 4. This singer-songwriter was born in Egypt but moved to Canada as a
< child. He has had a very successful career as a children's
< entertainer, with songs such as "Bananaphone" and "Baby Beluga." He is
< also an environment activist and runs the Center for Child Honouring.
 
Raffi.
 
< 7. This Canadian is best known as a film director. Among his films are
< The Sweet Hereafter, Chloe (his highest-grossing film), The Captive,
< Ararat, and Felicia's Journey.
 
Egoyan.
 
< 8. This American author wrote many books, stories, and plays. His
< best-known play is probably The Time of Your Life, which won the 1939
< Pulitzer for drama and was later made into a move starring James
< Cagney. His novel The Human Comedy was originally a screenplay and was
< in fact made as a movie starring Mickey Rooney; <answer 8> won the
< Oscar for best story for this.
 
Agee.
 
< 9. This American singer and actress originally became popular as part
< of a duo with her then-husband but has been flying solo since
< 1975. She started her acting career in 1982 and did most of her best
< acting work in the 80s, including winning an Oscar. She also has an
< Emmy and a Grammy.
 
Cher.
 
< 10. This Canadian was one of the best-known portrait photographers of
< the 20th century. Possibly his most famous work was his 1941 picture
< of Winston Churchill on the cover of Life, but he also photographed 50
< others of the most 100 influential people of the 20th century,
< according to International Who's Who. (And he was on the list
< himself.)
 
Karsh.
 
Well, I'm pretty sure of those last 5 answers and I don't see the theme.
Cher's surname was Sarkisian at some point in her life; so are they all
of Armenian birth or ancestry, maybe? If so, too late for #1. But then...
 
< 2. This Soviet composer is best known for his ballets Gayane and
< Spartacus, in particular a movement late in the former where the
< dancers perform with swords.
 
Khatchaturian?
 
< 5. This American actress was one of the original cast of SCTV. She has
< also done considerable film work (most recently in My Big Fat Greek
< Wedding 2) and stage work; she has more Tony nominations for Featured
< Actress in a Musical than anyone else and has won twice, for My
< Favorite Year and Pippin. (Now we see who was paying attention the
< other week.)
 
I might as well guess Vardalos.
 
No guesses on the other two.
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | Actor sent to jail for not finishing sentence
msb@vex.net | --Knoxville, TN, News-Sentinel, 1989-01-21
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
"Peter Smyth" <smythp@gmail.com>: May 23 03:37PM

Mark Brader wrote:
 
 
> * Game 3, Round 4 - Geography - Eponymous Airports
 
> In each case, name the major city that the airport serves.
 
> 1. George Bush Intercontinental Airport.
Houston
> 2. Robert L. Stanfield International Airport.
> 3. Norman Manley International Airport.
> 4. Frédéric Chopin International Airport.
Warsaw
> 5. Nikola Tesla International Airport.
> 6. Franz Josef Strauss International Airport.
Vienna
> 7. Benito Juárez International Airport.
Mexico City
> 8. Louis Armstrong International Airport.
New Orleans
> 9. Ferenc Liszt International Airport.
Budapest
> 10. Václav Havel International Airport.
Prague
> skull "For the Love of God", which sold for $77,900,00 in 2007.
> Other works include various sharks in formaldehyde and medicine
> cabinets.
Damien Hirst
> are similar to Francis Bacon's. When he visited California,
> where he eventually settled, he produced a series of realistic
> paintings of swimming pools. His estimated worth is $40,000,000.
David Hockney
> and located in Chicago's Millennium Park, and "Sky Mirror",
> another stainless-steel piece that looks like a satellite dish.
> His estimated worth is $71,000,000.
Anish Kapoor
> 1998 that uses the filthy bed where she drank, slept, smoked,
> ate, and copulated while going through an emotional crisis.
> That piece eventually sold for over £2,500,000.
Tracy Emin
> he was commissioned by Mark Zuckerberg in 2007 to paint murals
> in Facebook's new headquarters and was paid in Facebook stock.
> He is worth an estimated $200,000,000.
 
 
Peter Smyth
Erland Sommarskog <esquel@sommarskog.se>: May 23 07:37PM +0200

> * Game 3, Round 4 - Geography - Eponymous Airports
 
> In each case, name the major city that the airport serves.
 
> 1. George Bush Intercontinental Airport.
 
Austin, TX
 
> 4. Frédéric Chopin International Airport.
 
Warsaw. (I was there just the other day.)
 
> 5. Nikola Tesla International Airport.
 
Belgrade
 
> 6. Franz Josef Strauss International Airport.
 
Munich
 
> 7. Benito Juárez International Airport.
 
Mexico City
 
> 8. Louis Armstrong International Airport.
 
New Orleans
 
> 9. Ferenc Liszt International Airport.
 
Budapest
 
> 10. Václav Havel International Airport.
 
Prague
 
 
--
Erland Sommarskog, Stockholm, esquel@sommarskog.se
Jason Kreitzer <jk71875@gmail.com>: May 23 07:21PM -0700

On Monday, May 22, 2017 at 9:11:39 PM UTC-4, Mark Brader wrote:
 
> * Game 3, Round 4 - Geography - Eponymous Airports
 
> In each case, name the major city that the airport serves.
 
> 1. George Bush Intercontinental Airport.
Houston, TX
> 2. Robert L. Stanfield International Airport.
> 3. Norman Manley International Airport.
> 4. Frédéric Chopin International Airport.
Warsaw?
> 5. Nikola Tesla International Airport.
> 6. Franz Josef Strauss International Airport.
Vienna?
> 7. Benito Juárez International Airport.
> 8. Louis Armstrong International Airport.
New Orleans
> 9. Ferenc Liszt International Airport.
> 10. Václav Havel International Airport.
Prague
Dan Tilque <dtilque@frontier.com>: May 23 09:17PM -0700

Mark Brader wrote:
 
> * Game 3, Round 4 - Geography - Eponymous Airports
 
> In each case, name the major city that the airport serves.
 
> 1. George Bush Intercontinental Airport.
 
Houston
 
> 2. Robert L. Stanfield International Airport.
> 3. Norman Manley International Airport.
> 4. Frédéric Chopin International Airport.
 
Wroclaw
 
> 5. Nikola Tesla International Airport.
 
Belgrade
 
> 6. Franz Josef Strauss International Airport.
> 7. Benito Juárez International Airport.
> 8. Louis Armstrong International Airport.
 
New Orleans
 
> 9. Ferenc Liszt International Airport.
 
Budapest
 
> 10. Václav Havel International Airport.
 
Prague
 
 
--
Dan Tilque
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