Tuesday, August 21, 2018

Digest for rec.games.trivia@googlegroups.com - 3 updates in 2 topics

Jason Kreitzer <jk71875@gmail.com>: Aug 20 03:02PM -0700

On Saturday, August 18, 2018 at 11:40:32 AM UTC-4, Mark Brader wrote:
> referred to by a different acronym, GRID, before researchers
> realized that it was not limited to gay men. What did GRID
> stand for?
Gay-Related Immune Disease
> a doctor threatened with eviction from his home because he
> was treating AIDS patients. Within one year, when was that
> lawsuit filed?
1985
> his allies and he was ousted from the organization in 1983.
> He later wrote "The Normal Heart", a semi-autobiographical play
> about the early days of the crisis. Name him.
Larry Kramer
> new activist group whose goals were explicitly political.
> They organized many successful protests against the FDA, the
> CDC, and the Catholic Church (among others). Name the group.
ACT UP
> community attempted to bar him from returning to school in 1985.
> His family was threatened and his home shot at. He died of
> AIDS-related complications in 1988. Who was he?
Ryan White
> got AIDS, and Trump dumped him after learning this. In 1986
> he was disbarred for unethical acts as a lawyer, and he died
> of the disease less than 6 weeks later. Name him.
Roy Cohn
> with the deadly toll of AIDS on society. As of 2016, it is the
> largest piece of communal art in the world and weighs 54 tons.
> What *type* of artwork is it?
AIDS Quilt
> went on to the unprecedented step of mailing an informational
> package to every household in the United States about HIV and
> AIDS transmission. Name this Surgeon-General.
Dr. Everett C. Koop
 
> 1. Jack Kirby: probably the most influential superhero comic artist
> of all time, he co-created Captain America, the Hulk, Black
> Panther, and the original X-Men, among others.
10.
> 2. Steve Ditko: the co-creator of Spider-Man, known both for his
> psychedelic landscapes and his weird libertarian political
> beliefs.
2.
> 3. Jim Aparo: DC Comics' most important and reliable artist of
> the 1970s and '80s, and considered one of the iconic Batman
> artists.
13.
> 4. George Perez: Most famous for his runs on "The Avengers", "Crisis
> on Infinite Earths", and "Wonder Woman", Perez's neo-classical
> superhero style has made him a fan favorite for over forty years.
11
> 5. Darwyn Cooke: this Torontonian artist won numerous Eisner,
> Harvey, and Joe Schuster awards for his elegant, cartoony style.
9
> 6. Jeff Smith: also a Harvey and Eisner winner, best known for his
> long-form masterwork "Bone", but also happy to work on corporate
> properties.
5
> to Watch Out For", she has since published two graphic novels
> about her childhood, one of which was adapted into a Tony-award
> winning play.
4
> 8. Jillian Tamaki: Winner of the Caldecott Award and a Governor-
> General's Award for children's illustration, she works primarily
> with her writer sister Mariko.
7
> 9. Mike Mignola: Best known for creating properties which have
> spawned numerous successful movies, his style has been described
> as "German expressionism meets Jack Kirby".
8
> 10. Fiona Staples: This Calgarian is considered one of the best
> artists working today, on books such as Saga and the recent
> reboot of "Archie".
14
tool@panix.com (Dan Blum): Aug 20 01:50PM

> 1 Named for the dramatic art form where they are traditionally worn, which style of women???s gloves extend beyond the elbow?
 
opera
 
> 2 Antony Gormley's Angel of The North??is located in which English city?
 
York
 
> 3 What is the alliterative two-word term for an inclined frame on front of a railroad locomotive for throwing obstacles off the track?
 
cow catcher
 
> 4 What two-word name is shared by a US TV character of the 1970s and 80s, and the very short cut-off jeans she regularly wore?
 
Daisy Duke
 
> 5 Three dimensional objects with only one side are named for which German mathematician?
 
Moebius
 
> 6 Which actress portrayed psychiatrist Jennifer Melfi on the TV series 'The Sopranos'?
 
Bracco
 
> 7 Which US pop star (b. 1980) had hits with 'Genie in a Bottle' and 'What a Girl Wants'?
 
Christina Aguilera
 
> 8 'Beano' is an alternative name for which popular game of chance?
 
Bingo
 
> 9 Which American singer-songwriter's first album 'Jagged Little Pill' was released in 1995?
 
Alanis Morrisette
 
> 10 Which girl's name is also a term for an excessively cheerful or optimistic person?
 
Pollyanna
 
--
_______________________________________________________________________
Dan Blum tool@panix.com
"I wouldn't have believed it myself if I hadn't just made it up."
Erland Sommarskog <esquel@sommarskog.se>: Aug 20 11:20PM +0200

> 2 Antony Gormley's Angel of The North is located in which English
> city?
 
Leicester
 
> 5 Three dimensional objects with only one side are named for which
> German mathematician?
 
Gauss
 
> 9 Which American singer-songwriter's first album 'Jagged Little
> Pill' was released in 1995?
 
Tori Amos
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Monday, August 20, 2018

Digest for rec.games.trivia@googlegroups.com - 9 updates in 3 topics

Calvin <334152@gmail.com>: Aug 19 10:26PM -0700

1 Named for the dramatic art form where they are traditionally worn, which style of women's gloves extend beyond the elbow?
2 Antony Gormley's Angel of The North is located in which English city?
3 What is the alliterative two-word term for an inclined frame on front of a railroad locomotive for throwing obstacles off the track?
4 What two-word name is shared by a US TV character of the 1970s and 80s, and the very short cut-off jeans she regularly wore?
5 Three dimensional objects with only one side are named for which German mathematician?
6 Which actress portrayed psychiatrist Jennifer Melfi on the TV series 'The Sopranos'?
7 Which US pop star (b. 1980) had hits with 'Genie in a Bottle' and 'What a Girl Wants'?
8 'Beano' is an alternative name for which popular game of chance?
9 Which American singer-songwriter's first album 'Jagged Little Pill' was released in 1995?
10 Which girl's name is also a term for an excessively cheerful or optimistic person?
 
 
cheers,
calvin
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Aug 20 12:42AM -0500

"Calvin":
> 1 Named for the dramatic art form where they are traditionally worn,
> which style of women's gloves extend beyond the elbow?
 
Opera gloves?
 
> 2 Antony Gormley's Angel of The North is located in which English city?
 
Sheffield?
 
> 3 What is the alliterative two-word term for an inclined frame on
> front of a railroad locomotive for throwing obstacles off the track?
 
Cowcatcher -- normally one word in my experience. You forgot to say
"North American" railroad locomotive, though I guess the use of
"railroad" implied that anyway.
 
> 4 What two-word name is shared by a US TV character of the 1970s and
> 80s, and the very short cut-off jeans she regularly wore?
 
Daisy Duke(s).
 
> 5 Three dimensional objects with only one side are named for which
> German mathematician?
 
Klein.
 
> 6 Which actress portrayed psychiatrist Jennifer Melfi on the TV
> series 'The Sopranos'?
 
Moore?
 
> 7 Which US pop star (b. 1980) had hits with 'Genie in a Bottle' and
> 'What a Girl Wants'?
 
Hmm, I should know this. Lauper?
 
> 8 'Beano' is an alternative name for which popular game of chance?
 
Bingo.
 
> 9 Which American singer-songwriter's first album 'Jagged Little
> Pill' was released in 1995?
 
Isn't that Alanis Morrisette and isn't she Canadian?
 
> 10 Which girl's name is also a term for an excessively cheerful or
> optimistic person?
 
Pollyanna.
--
Mark Brader "It's simply a matter of style, and while there
Toronto are many wrong styles, there really isn't any
msb@vex.net one right style." -- Ray Butterworth
Gareth Owen <gwowen@gmail.com>: Aug 20 07:14AM +0100


> 1 Named for the dramatic art form where they are traditionally worn,
> which style of women's gloves extend beyond the elbow?
 
Opera Gloves
 
> 2 Antony Gormley's Angel of The North is located in which English
> city?
 
Gateshead
 
> 3 What is the alliterative two-word term for an inclined frame on
> front of a railroad locomotive for throwing obstacles off the track?
 
Cow Catcher
 
> 4 What two-word name is shared by a US TV character of the 1970s and
> 80s, and the very short cut-off jeans she regularly wore?
 
Daisy Duke(s)
 
> 5 Three dimensional objects with only one side are named for which
> German mathematician?
 
Moebius
 
> 6 Which actress portrayed psychiatrist Jennifer Melfi on the TV series
> 'The Sopranos'?
 
Lorainne Bracco
 
> 7 Which US pop star (b. 1980) had hits with 'Genie in a Bottle' and
> 'What a Girl Wants'?
 
Xtina Aguilera
 
> 8 'Beano' is an alternative name for which popular game of chance?
 
No idea
 
> 9 Which American singer-songwriter's first album 'Jagged Little Pill'
> was released in 1995?
 
Alanis Morrisette
 
> 10 Which girl's name is also a term for an excessively cheerful or
> optimistic person?
 
Pollyanna
Dan Tilque <dtilque@frontier.com>: Aug 19 02:33AM -0700

Calvin wrote:
> 1 Named for the dramatic art form where they are traditionally worn, which style of women's gloves extend beyond the elbow?
> 2 Antony Gormley's Angel of The North is located in which English city?
> 3 What is the alliterative two-word term for an inclined frame on front of a railroad locomotive for throwing obstacles off the track?
 
cow catcher
 
> 4 What two-word name is shared by a US TV character of the 1970s and 80s, and the very short cut-off jeans she regularly wore?
 
Daisy Dukes
 
> 5 Three dimensional objects with only one side are named for which German mathematician?
 
Klein
 
> 6 Which actress portrayed psychiatrist Jennifer Melfi on the TV series 'The Sopranos'?
> 7 Which US pop star (b. 1980) had hits with 'Genie in a Bottle' and 'What a Girl Wants'?
> 8 'Beano' is an alternative name for which popular game of chance?
 
Bingo
 
> 9 Which American singer-songwriter's first album 'Jagged Little Pill' was released in 1995?
> 10 Which girl's name is also a term for an excessively cheerful or optimistic person?
 
Polyanna
 
 
--
Dan Tilque
"Peter Smyth" <smythp@gmail.com>: Aug 20 10:42AM

Calvin wrote:
 
> 1 Named for the dramatic art form where they are traditionally worn, which style of women's gloves extend beyond the elbow?
 
Opera
 
> 2 Antony Gormley's Angel of The North is located in which English city?
 
Gateshead
 
> 3 What is the alliterative two-word term for an inclined frame on front of a railroad locomotive for throwing obstacles off the track?
 
Cow Catcher
 
> 4 What two-word name is shared by a US TV character of the 1970s and 80s, and the very short cut-off jeans she regularly wore?
> 5 Three dimensional objects with only one side are named for which German mathematician?
 
Klein
 
> 6 Which actress portrayed psychiatrist Jennifer Melfi on the TV series 'The Sopranos'?
> 7 Which US pop star (b. 1980) had hits with 'Genie in a Bottle' and 'What a Girl Wants'?
 
Christina Aguilera
 
> 8 'Beano' is an alternative name for which popular game of chance?
> 9 Which American singer-songwriter's first album 'Jagged Little Pill' was released in 1995?
 
Alanis Morissette
 
> 10 Which girl's name is also a term for an excessively cheerful or optimistic person?
 
 
Peter Smyth
tool@panix.com (Dan Blum): Aug 19 02:54PM

> a doctor threatened with eviction from his home because he
> was treating AIDS patients. Within one year, when was that
> lawsuit filed?
 
1980; 1985
 
> 3. The retrovirus that causes AIDS, now called HIV, was identified
> in 1983. In which country did researchers first discover it?
 
USA; UK
 
> his allies and he was ousted from the organization in 1983.
> He later wrote "The Normal Heart", a semi-autobiographical play
> about the early days of the crisis. Name him.
 
Larry Kramer
 
> new activist group whose goals were explicitly political.
> They organized many successful protests against the FDA, the
> CDC, and the Catholic Church (among others). Name the group.
 
ACT-UP
 
> community attempted to bar him from returning to school in 1985.
> His family was threatened and his home shot at. He died of
> AIDS-related complications in 1988. Who was he?
 
White
 
> got AIDS, and Trump dumped him after learning this. In 1986
> he was disbarred for unethical acts as a lawyer, and he died
> of the disease less than 6 weeks later. Name him.
 
Roy Cohn
 
> with the deadly toll of AIDS on society. As of 2016, it is the
> largest piece of communal art in the world and weighs 54 tons.
> What *type* of artwork is it?
 
patchwork quilt
 
> went on to the unprecedented step of mailing an informational
> package to every household in the United States about HIV and
> AIDS transmission. Name this Surgeon-General.
 
Koop
 
> low even if "the male partner is infected". <answer 5> protested
> at the magazine's offices and the magazine eventually retracted
> the article. Name the magazine.
 
Good Housekeeping; Cosmopolitan
 
 
 
> 1. Jack Kirby: probably the most influential superhero comic artist
> of all time, he co-created Captain America, the Hulk, Black
> Panther, and the original X-Men, among others.
 
16
 
> 2. Steve Ditko: the co-creator of Spider-Man, known both for his
> psychedelic landscapes and his weird libertarian political
> beliefs.
 
2
 
> 3. Jim Aparo: DC Comics' most important and reliable artist of
> the 1970s and '80s, and considered one of the iconic Batman
> artists.
 
5
 
> 4. George Perez: Most famous for his runs on "The Avengers", "Crisis
> on Infinite Earths", and "Wonder Woman", Perez's neo-classical
> superhero style has made him a fan favorite for over forty years.
 
13
 
> 5. Darwyn Cooke: this Torontonian artist won numerous Eisner,
> Harvey, and Joe Schuster awards for his elegant, cartoony style.
 
11; 7
 
> 6. Jeff Smith: also a Harvey and Eisner winner, best known for his
> long-form masterwork "Bone", but also happy to work on corporate
> properties.
 
6
 
> to Watch Out For", she has since published two graphic novels
> about her childhood, one of which was adapted into a Tony-award
> winning play.
 
15
 
> 8. Jillian Tamaki: Winner of the Caldecott Award and a Governor-
> General's Award for children's illustration, she works primarily
> with her writer sister Mariko.
 
7; 11
 
> 9. Mike Mignola: Best known for creating properties which have
> spawned numerous successful movies, his style has been described
> as "German expressionism meets Jack Kirby".
 
8
 
> 10. Fiona Staples: This Calgarian is considered one of the best
> artists working today, on books such as Saga and the recent
> reboot of "Archie".
 
4
 
--
_______________________________________________________________________
Dan Blum tool@panix.com
"I wouldn't have believed it myself if I hadn't just made it up."
Pete Gayde <pagrsg@wowway.com>: Aug 19 06:55PM

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote in news:SsWdnU0ao-t3oOXGnZ2dnUU7-
> referred to by a different acronym, GRID, before researchers
> realized that it was not limited to gay men. What did GRID
> stand for?
 
Gay Related Immune Disease
 
> a doctor threatened with eviction from his home because he
> was treating AIDS patients. Within one year, when was that
> lawsuit filed?
 
1981; 1984
 
 
> 3. The retrovirus that causes AIDS, now called HIV, was identified
> in 1983. In which country did researchers first discover it?
 
Holland; France
 
> community attempted to bar him from returning to school in 1985.
> His family was threatened and his home shot at. He died of
> AIDS-related complications in 1988. Who was he?
 
White
 
> got AIDS, and Trump dumped him after learning this. In 1986
> he was disbarred for unethical acts as a lawyer, and he died
> of the disease less than 6 weeks later. Name him.
 
Roy Cohn
 
> with the deadly toll of AIDS on society. As of 2016, it is the
> largest piece of communal art in the world and weighs 54 tons.
> What *type* of artwork is it?
 
Quilt
 
> went on to the unprecedented step of mailing an informational
> package to every household in the United States about HIV and
> AIDS transmission. Name this Surgeon-General.
 
Coop
 
> low even if "the male partner is infected". <answer 5> protested
> at the magazine's offices and the magazine eventually retracted
> the article. Name the magazine.
 
Cosmopolitan
 
 
Pete Gayde
Dan Tilque <dtilque@frontier.com>: Aug 19 02:08AM -0700

Mark Brader wrote:
> referred to by a different acronym, GRID, before researchers
> realized that it was not limited to gay men. What did GRID
> stand for?
 
Gay Related Immune Deficiency
 
> a doctor threatened with eviction from his home because he
> was treating AIDS patients. Within one year, when was that
> lawsuit filed?
 
1985
 
 
> 3. The retrovirus that causes AIDS, now called HIV, was identified
> in 1983. In which country did researchers first discover it?
 
France
 
> with the deadly toll of AIDS on society. As of 2016, it is the
> largest piece of communal art in the world and weighs 54 tons.
> What *type* of artwork is it?
 
quilt
 
> went on to the unprecedented step of mailing an informational
> package to every household in the United States about HIV and
> AIDS transmission. Name this Surgeon-General.
 
C. Everett Koop
 
> low even if "the male partner is infected". <answer 5> protested
> at the magazine's offices and the magazine eventually retracted
> the article. Name the magazine.
 
Cosmopolitan
 
 
> 1. Jack Kirby: probably the most influential superhero comic artist
> of all time, he co-created Captain America, the Hulk, Black
> Panther, and the original X-Men, among others.
 
16
 
 
> 2. Steve Ditko: the co-creator of Spider-Man, known both for his
> psychedelic landscapes and his weird libertarian political
> beliefs.
 
2
 
 
> 3. Jim Aparo: DC Comics' most important and reliable artist of
> the 1970s and '80s, and considered one of the iconic Batman
> artists.
 
1
 
 
> 4. George Perez: Most famous for his runs on "The Avengers", "Crisis
> on Infinite Earths", and "Wonder Woman", Perez's neo-classical
> superhero style has made him a fan favorite for over forty years.
 
3
 
 
> 9. Mike Mignola: Best known for creating properties which have
> spawned numerous successful movies, his style has been described
> as "German expressionism meets Jack Kirby".
 
18
 
 
--
Dan Tilque
Calvin <334152@gmail.com>: Aug 19 10:20PM -0700

On Friday, August 10, 2018 at 2:37:34 PM UTC+10, Calvin wrote:
 
> 1 What does an oenophile enjoy?
 
Wine
 
> 2 What metal is used to galvanise steel?
 
Zinc
 
> 3 The Matterhorn straddles the border between which TWO European countries?
 
Switzerland and Italy
 
> 4 Which American inventor and entrepreneur (1886-1956) is considered the father of frozen food?
 
Clarence Birdseye
 
> 5 A tradition at African-American weddings involves the bride and groom jumping over what household object?
 
Broom
 
> 6 Which character is the protagonist in the Dan Brown novels 'Angels and Demons' and 'The Lost Symbol'?
 
Robert Langdon
 
> 7 Also known as analytical or coordinate geometry, which branch of geometry was named after the philosopher Rene Descartes?
 
Cartesian [geometry]
 
> 8 Ion Iliescu is a former president of which European country?
 
Romania
 
> 9 At the 1996 Olympics which track athlete won the 200 and 400 metres while wearing golden shoes?
 
Michael Johnson
 
> 10 What substance is the skeleton of corals composed of?
 
Calcium carbonate / CaCO3
 
Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q5 Q6 Q7 Q8 Q9 Q10 TOTAL TB Quiz 531
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 9 50 Mark Brader
1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 9 53 Bruce Bowler
1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 8 46 Pete Gayde
1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 8 49 Gareth Owen
1 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 7 44 Dan Blum
1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 6 39 Dan Tilque
1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 5 35 Peter Smyth
0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 3 21 Erland S
- - - - - - - - - - --- ----------
7 5 2 7 5 4 8 8 5 4 55 69%
 
Congratulations Mark.

cheers,
calvin
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Sunday, August 19, 2018

Digest for rec.games.trivia@googlegroups.com - 4 updates in 2 topics

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Aug 18 10:40AM -0500

These questions were written to be asked in Toronto on 2018-06-04,
and should be interpreted accordingly.
 
On each question you may give up to two answers, but if you give
both a right answer and a wrong answer, there is a small penalty.
Please post all your answers to the newsgroup in a single followup,
based only on your own knowledge. (In your answer posting, quote
the questions and place your answer below each one.) I will reveal
the correct answers in about 3 days.
 
All questions were written by members of What She Said and are
used here by permission, but have been reformatted and may have
been retyped and/or edited by me. For further information see
my 2018-07-16 companion posting on "Questions from the Canadian
Inquisition (QFTCI*)".
 
 
* Game 3, Round 7 - History - The AIDS Crisis
 
Although forensic medicine has determined that HIV was actually
present at very low levels in the American populace as early as
the 1960s, AIDS exploded in notoriety in the late 1970s and 1980s,
and defined a generation of gay activism. To commemorate the
first week of Pride Month, these questions are about the biggest
North American health crisis of the past 50 years.
 
1. In the early days of the disease's spread, AIDS was briefly
referred to by a different acronym, GRID, before researchers
realized that it was not limited to gay men. What did GRID
stand for?
 
2. The first AIDS-discrimination lawsuit was filed on behalf of
a doctor threatened with eviction from his home because he
was treating AIDS patients. Within one year, when was that
lawsuit filed?
 
3. The retrovirus that causes AIDS, now called HIV, was identified
in 1983. In which country did researchers first discover it?
 
4. This playwright, columnist, and activist helped to organize
GMHC (Gay Men's Health Crisis) as an early activist response
to the disease, but his firebrand style alienated many of
his allies and he was ousted from the organization in 1983.
He later wrote "The Normal Heart", a semi-autobiographical play
about the early days of the crisis. Name him.
 
5. After being kicked out of GMHC, <answer 4> organized a
new activist group whose goals were explicitly political.
They organized many successful protests against the FDA, the
CDC, and the Catholic Church (among others). Name the group.
 
6. This Indiana teenager contracted HIV due to a contaminated
blood treatment for his hemophilia, and members of his
community attempted to bar him from returning to school in 1985.
His family was threatened and his home shot at. He died of
AIDS-related complications in 1988. Who was he?
 
7. This attorney and political operative assisted Senator Joseph
McCarthy in his anti-Communist "witch-hunt" and later served as
counsel to Donald Trump. He was also a closeted homosexual who
got AIDS, and Trump dumped him after learning this. In 1986
he was disbarred for unethical acts as a lawyer, and he died
of the disease less than 6 weeks later. Name him.
 
8. In response to the crisis and to pressure government, activists
created this piece of community folk art to impress the populace
with the deadly toll of AIDS on society. As of 2016, it is the
largest piece of communal art in the world and weighs 54 tons.
What *type* of artwork is it?
 
9. This man was Surgeon-General of the US under President
Ronald Reagan. He was prevented from discussing AIDS, until
Reagan asked him for a report. Against Reagan's expectation,
the report emphasized widespread education, encouraged condom
use, and rejected mandatory-testing regimes. In 1988 he
went on to the unprecedented step of mailing an informational
package to every household in the United States about HIV and
AIDS transmission. Name this Surgeon-General.
 
10. This popular women's magazine published an article in 1988
written by a psychiatrist that claimed that if men and women had
"healthy genitals", the risk of HIV transmission was extremely
low even if "the male partner is infected". <answer 5> protested
at the magazine's offices and the magazine eventually retracted
the article. Name the magazine.
 
 
 
* Game 3, Round 8 - Art - Comic-Book Artists
 
Please see the 3-page handout at:
 
http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/3-8/comix.pdf
 
Comic-book artists are often known for their distinctive style.
We'll give you a name and some other information, and you identify
which number image they drew.
 
1. Jack Kirby: probably the most influential superhero comic artist
of all time, he co-created Captain America, the Hulk, Black
Panther, and the original X-Men, among others.
 
2. Steve Ditko: the co-creator of Spider-Man, known both for his
psychedelic landscapes and his weird libertarian political
beliefs.
 
3. Jim Aparo: DC Comics' most important and reliable artist of
the 1970s and '80s, and considered one of the iconic Batman
artists.
 
4. George Perez: Most famous for his runs on "The Avengers", "Crisis
on Infinite Earths", and "Wonder Woman", Perez's neo-classical
superhero style has made him a fan favorite for over forty years.
 
5. Darwyn Cooke: this Torontonian artist won numerous Eisner,
Harvey, and Joe Schuster awards for his elegant, cartoony style.
 
6. Jeff Smith: also a Harvey and Eisner winner, best known for his
long-form masterwork "Bone", but also happy to work on corporate
properties.
 
7. Alison Bechdel: Rising to prominence for her comic strip, "Dykes
to Watch Out For", she has since published two graphic novels
about her childhood, one of which was adapted into a Tony-award
winning play.
 
8. Jillian Tamaki: Winner of the Caldecott Award and a Governor-
General's Award for children's illustration, she works primarily
with her writer sister Mariko.
 
9. Mike Mignola: Best known for creating properties which have
spawned numerous successful movies, his style has been described
as "German expressionism meets Jack Kirby".
 
10. Fiona Staples: This Calgarian is considered one of the best
artists working today, on books such as Saga and the recent
reboot of "Archie".
 
So there were 8 decoys. Decode the rot13 if you'd like to see
their names and identify which picture they drew, with no further
information, for fun, but for no points.
 
11. Wbua Olear.
 
12. Xngr Orngba.
 
13. Qna QrPneyb.
 
14. Arny Nqnzf.
 
15. Pney Onexf.
 
16. Nznaqn Pbaare.
 
17. Senax Zvyyre.
 
18. Pheg Fjna.
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "People are entitled to their own opinions,
msb@vex.net | but not their own facts." --Michael Bloomberg
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
Erland Sommarskog <esquel@sommarskog.se>: Aug 18 08:17PM +0200

> referred to by a different acronym, GRID, before researchers
> realized that it was not limited to gay men. What did GRID
> stand for?
 
Gay Reduced Immunity Defense

> a doctor threatened with eviction from his home because he
> was treating AIDS patients. Within one year, when was that
> lawsuit filed?
 
1988

> 3. The retrovirus that causes AIDS, now called HIV, was identified
> in 1983. In which country did researchers first discover it?
 
Zaire

> went on to the unprecedented step of mailing an informational
> package to every household in the United States about HIV and
> AIDS transmission. Name this Surgeon-General.
 
Coop

 
> 1. Jack Kirby: probably the most influential superhero comic artist
> of all time, he co-created Captain America, the Hulk, Black
> Panther, and the original X-Men, among others.
 
3

> 2. Steve Ditko: the co-creator of Spider-Man, known both for his
> psychedelic landscapes and his weird libertarian political
> beliefs.
 
10

> 3. Jim Aparo: DC Comics' most important and reliable artist of
> the 1970s and '80s, and considered one of the iconic Batman
> artists.
 
5

> 4. George Perez: Most famous for his runs on "The Avengers", "Crisis
> on Infinite Earths", and "Wonder Woman", Perez's neo-classical
> superhero style has made him a fan favorite for over forty years.
 
18
 
> 5. Darwyn Cooke: this Torontonian artist won numerous Eisner,
> Harvey, and Joe Schuster awards for his elegant, cartoony style.
 
11

> 6. Jeff Smith: also a Harvey and Eisner winner, best known for his
> long-form masterwork "Bone", but also happy to work on corporate
> properties.
 
15

> to Watch Out For", she has since published two graphic novels
> about her childhood, one of which was adapted into a Tony-award
> winning play.
 
12

> 8. Jillian Tamaki: Winner of the Caldecott Award and a Governor-
> General's Award for children's illustration, she works primarily
> with her writer sister Mariko.
 
14
 
 
> 9. Mike Mignola: Best known for creating properties which have
> spawned numerous successful movies, his style has been described
> as "German expressionism meets Jack Kirby".
 
2
 
> 10. Fiona Staples: This Calgarian is considered one of the best
> artists working today, on books such as Saga and the recent
> reboot of "Archie".
 
7
Joshua Kreitzer <gromit82@hotmail.com>: Aug 19 04:58AM

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote in news:SsWdnU0ao-t3oOXGnZ2dnUU7-
> community attempted to bar him from returning to school in 1985.
> His family was threatened and his home shot at. He died of
> AIDS-related complications in 1988. Who was he?
 
Ryan White
 
> got AIDS, and Trump dumped him after learning this. In 1986
> he was disbarred for unethical acts as a lawyer, and he died
> of the disease less than 6 weeks later. Name him.
 
Roy Cohn

> with the deadly toll of AIDS on society. As of 2016, it is the
> largest piece of communal art in the world and weighs 54 tons.
> What *type* of artwork is it?
 
quilt
 
> went on to the unprecedented step of mailing an informational
> package to every household in the United States about HIV and
> AIDS transmission. Name this Surgeon-General.
 
Everett Koop
 
 
> 1. Jack Kirby: probably the most influential superhero comic artist
> of all time, he co-created Captain America, the Hulk, Black
> Panther, and the original X-Men, among others.
 
16
 
> 2. Steve Ditko: the co-creator of Spider-Man, known both for his
> psychedelic landscapes and his weird libertarian political
> beliefs.
 
2
 
> 3. Jim Aparo: DC Comics' most important and reliable artist of
> the 1970s and '80s, and considered one of the iconic Batman
> artists.
 
5; 13

> 4. George Perez: Most famous for his runs on "The Avengers", "Crisis
> on Infinite Earths", and "Wonder Woman", Perez's neo-classical
> superhero style has made him a fan favorite for over forty years.
 
1; 3
 
> 5. Darwyn Cooke: this Torontonian artist won numerous Eisner,
> Harvey, and Joe Schuster awards for his elegant, cartoony style.
 
18
 
> 6. Jeff Smith: also a Harvey and Eisner winner, best known for his
> long-form masterwork "Bone", but also happy to work on corporate
> properties.
 
6
 
> to Watch Out For", she has since published two graphic novels
> about her childhood, one of which was adapted into a Tony-award
> winning play.
 
15; 12
 
> 8. Jillian Tamaki: Winner of the Caldecott Award and a Governor-
> General's Award for children's illustration, she works primarily
> with her writer sister Mariko.
 
4
 
> 9. Mike Mignola: Best known for creating properties which have
> spawned numerous successful movies, his style has been described
> as "German expressionism meets Jack Kirby".
 
8; 17
 
> 10. Fiona Staples: This Calgarian is considered one of the best
> artists working today, on books such as Saga and the recent
> reboot of "Archie".
 
11; 4

> their names and identify which picture they drew, with no further
> information, for fun, but for no points.
 
> 13. Qna QrPneyb.
 
14

> 15. Pney Onexf.
 
9

> 17. Senax Zvyyre.
 
13
 
--
Joshua Kreitzer
gromit82@hotmail.com
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Aug 18 10:38AM -0500

Mark Brader:
> have bred seven other breeds of dog recognized by the American
> Kennel Club, the oldest of which is the "cú faoil" ["koo feel"].
> What do we know that one as?
 
Irish wolfhound. 4 for Dan Tilque and Stephen. 2 for Pete.
 
> 2. This dog was initially bred in France, where it is known as the
> "chien de St-Hubert". What do we call it?
 
Bloodhound. 4 for Stephen.
 
> 3. The "xolo" ["CHO-low"] is the proper name for this dog, one of
> which was recently featured in the Pixar film "Coco".
 
Mexican hairless dog. 4 for Stephen.
 
> 4. The Chinese refer to this breed as the "songshi quan" ["song-SHE
> kwan"], which translates to "puffy lion dog".
 
Chow chow (one "chow" was sufficient). 4 for Dan Blum and Stephen.
 
> 5. In Dari Persian, this dog is called the "sag-e tazi" ["SADGE-eh
> TAW-zee"]; in Pashto, it is the "tazi spay" ["TAH-zee SPAY"].
 
Afghan hound. 4 for Dan Blum and Stephen.
 
> 6. The Azande ["ah-ZAN-"day] people of South Sudan know this dog
> as the "ango angari", which means "dog of the bush".
 
Basenji. 4 for Dan Blum, Dan Tilque, and Stephen.
 
> 7. In Zimbabwe, the Shona call this dog shumba imbwa ["shoom-BAH
> im-BWAH"], which means "lion dog", because they used it to keep
> lions at bay.
 
Rhodesian ridgeback. 4 for Stephen.
 
> 8. These dogs were originally called "alpenmastiffs", until Swiss
> and German breeders in the late 19th century realized they were
> not actually related to mastiffs.
 
St. Bernard. 4 for Dan Blum, Pete, and Stephen.
 
> 9. The Germans originally called these large dogs "Kammerhunde",
> and dressed them in gilded collars -- when they weren't using
> them to hunt boars or even bears.
 
Great Dane. 4 for Stephen. 3 for Dan Blum.
 
> 10. This Japanese breed's name translates to "little brushwood dog".
 
Shiba inu ("shiba" was sufficient). 4 for Dan Blum and Stephen.
 
 
 
> We name a house brand and you tell us the retailer (or any one
> of the group of related retailers) that exclusively sells it.
> Answers may repeat.
 
This was the easiest round in the original game.
 
> 1. Blue Menu.
 
Loblaws, No Frills. Also accepting President's Choice, which used
to be a house brand name itself, not a retailer. 4 for Stephen.
 
> 2. Life Brand.
 
Shoppers Drug Mart. 4 for Stephen.
 
> 3. Kirkland.
 
Costco. 4 for Dan Blum, Joshua, Pete, and Stephen.
 
> 4. Mastercraft.
 
Canadian Tire.
 
> 5. Black Brown.
 
Hudson's Bay. Also accepting Lord and Taylor. 4 for Stephen.
 
> 6. Irresistibles.
 
Metro, Food Basics.
 
> 7. Compliments.
 
Sobeys, FreshCo, Price Chopper. 4 for Stephen.
 
> 8. Edit by Jeanne Beker.
 
Hudson's Bay. 4 for Stephen.
 
> 9. Frank.
 
Canadian Tire. Also accepting Glasses Barn. 4 for Stephen.
 
> 10. George.
 
Wal-Mart. Also accepting Asda. 4 for Stephen.
 
 
Scores, if there are no errors:
 
GAME 3 ROUNDS-> 2 3 4 6 TOTALS
TOPICS-> Geo Ent Sci Mis
Stephen Perry -- -- 40 32 72
Dan Blum 12 24 23 4 63
Joshua Kreitzer 20 36 0 4 60
"Calvin" 24 20 -- -- 44
Pete Gayde 0 8 6 4 18
Erland Sommarskog 16 0 -- -- 16
Dan Tilque 0 8 8 0 16
 
--
Mark Brader "Nicely self-consistent. (Pay no attention to
Toronto that D-floating number behind the curtain!)"
msb@vex.net -- Chris Torek, on pasta
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
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Friday, August 17, 2018

Digest for rec.games.trivia@googlegroups.com - 4 updates in 2 topics

Pete Gayde <pagrsg@wowway.com>: Aug 16 07:48PM

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote in news:kuadnQB3dbts2OnGnZ2dnUU7-
> have bred seven other breeds of dog recognized by the American
> Kennel Club, the oldest of which is the "cú faoil" ["koo feel"].
> What do we know that one as?
 
Irish setter; Irish wolfhound
 
 
> 2. This dog was initially bred in France, where it is known as the
> "chien de St-Hubert". What do we call it?
 
Poodle
 
 
> 3. The "xolo" ["CHO-low"] is the proper name for this dog, one of
> which was recently featured in the Pixar film "Coco".
 
Chihuahua
 
 
> 4. The Chinese refer to this breed as the "songshi quan" ["song-SHE
> kwan"], which translates to "puffy lion dog".
 
Shih-tzu
 
> TAW-zee"]; in Pashto, it is the "tazi spay" ["TAH-zee SPAY"].
 
> 6. The Azande ["ah-ZAN-"day] people of South Sudan know this dog
> as the "ango angari", which means "dog of the bush".
 
Hyena
 
 
> 8. These dogs were originally called "alpenmastiffs", until Swiss
> and German breeders in the late 19th century realized they were
> not actually related to mastiffs.
 
St Bernard
 
 
> 9. The Germans originally called these large dogs "Kammerhunde",
> and dressed them in gilded collars -- when they weren't using
> them to hunt boars or even bears.
 
German shepherd
 
 
> 10. This Japanese breed's name translates to "little brushwood dog".
 
Shih-tzu
 
 
> 1. Blue Menu.
> 2. Life Brand.
> 3. Kirkland.
 
Costco
 
> 8. Edit by Jeanne Beker.
> 9. Frank.
> 10. George.
 
Pete Gayde
Dan Tilque <dtilque@frontier.com>: Aug 16 06:59PM -0700

Mark Brader wrote:
> have bred seven other breeds of dog recognized by the American
> Kennel Club, the oldest of which is the "cú faoil" ["koo feel"].
> What do we know that one as?
 
Irish wolfhound
 
 
> 2. This dog was initially bred in France, where it is known as the
> "chien de St-Hubert". What do we call it?
 
St Bernard
 
> which was recently featured in the Pixar film "Coco".
 
> 4. The Chinese refer to this breed as the "songshi quan" ["song-SHE
> kwan"], which translates to "puffy lion dog".
 
shih tsu
 
> TAW-zee"]; in Pashto, it is the "tazi spay" ["TAH-zee SPAY"].
 
> 6. The Azande ["ah-ZAN-"day] people of South Sudan know this dog
> as the "ango angari", which means "dog of the bush".
 
basenji
 
 
> 8. These dogs were originally called "alpenmastiffs", until Swiss
> and German breeders in the late 19th century realized they were
> not actually related to mastiffs.
 
German shepard
 
 
--
Dan Tilque
swp <stephen.w.perry@gmail.com>: Aug 16 08:03PM -0700

On Wednesday, August 15, 2018 at 11:25:43 AM UTC-4, Mark Brader wrote:
> These questions were written to be asked in Toronto on 2018-06-04,
> and should be interpreted accordingly.
 
noted
 
> have bred seven other breeds of dog recognized by the American
> Kennel Club, the oldest of which is the "cú faoil" ["koo feel"].
> What do we know that one as?
 
irish wolfhound
 
> 2. This dog was initially bred in France, where it is known as the
> "chien de St-Hubert". What do we call it?
 
bloodhound
 
> 3. The "xolo" ["CHO-low"] is the proper name for this dog, one of
> which was recently featured in the Pixar film "Coco".
 
mexican hairless
 
> 4. The Chinese refer to this breed as the "songshi quan" ["song-SHE
> kwan"], which translates to "puffy lion dog".
 
chow chow (not to be confused with cao cao)
 
> 5. In Dari Persian, this dog is called the "sag-e tazi" ["SADGE-eh
> TAW-zee"]; in Pashto, it is the "tazi spay" ["TAH-zee SPAY"].
 
afghan hound
 
> 6. The Azande ["ah-ZAN-"day] people of South Sudan know this dog
> as the "ango angari", which means "dog of the bush".
 
basenji ?
 
> 7. In Zimbabwe, the Shona call this dog shumba imbwa ["shoom-BAH
> im-BWAH"], which means "lion dog", because they used it to keep
> lions at bay.
 
rhodesian ridgeback
 
> 8. These dogs were originally called "alpenmastiffs", until Swiss
> and German breeders in the late 19th century realized they were
> not actually related to mastiffs.
 
saint bernard?
 
> 9. The Germans originally called these large dogs "Kammerhunde",
> and dressed them in gilded collars -- when they weren't using
> them to hunt boars or even bears.
 
great dane
 
> 10. This Japanese breed's name translates to "little brushwood dog".
 
shiba inu
 
 
 
> We name a house brand and you tell us the retailer (or any one
> of the group of related retailers) that exclusively sells it.
> Answers may repeat.
 
well, this is tricky. I am certain that most of my answers are correct, but not always that they are what you were originally looking for.
 
> 1. Blue Menu.
 
president's choice?
 
> 2. Life Brand.
 
shoppers drug mart
 
> 3. Kirkland.
 
costco
 
> 4. Mastercraft.
 
mastercraft makes luxury high performance boats but you're looking for something else
 
> 5. Black Brown.
 
lord and taylor
 
> 6. Irresistibles.
 
meow mix ; neuhaus belgian chocolate
 
> 7. Compliments.
 
sobey
 
> 8. Edit by Jeanne Beker.
 
hudson's bay
 
> 9. Frank.
 
glasses barn
 
> 10. George.
 
asda stores ltd
 
 
 
swp
 
one day, and this day may never come, I will appear before you. If that day comes, I will ask you to complete a task on my behalf. you may not refuse. these are the terms of my agreement to assist you now. a great many others have come before you, and all are now indebted to me in this way. the choice is yours.
swp <stephen.w.perry@gmail.com>: Aug 16 08:00PM -0700

On Tuesday, August 14, 2018 at 9:13:11 PM UTC-4, Dan Blum wrote:
> This is Rotating Quiz #302. Entries must be posted by Tuesday,
> August 21st, 2018 at 10 PM (Eastern Daylight Time).
 
that's my wife's birthday.
 
> There is a theme but it does not affect scoring.
 
hmmm
 
> is worth 2 points; I do not have any way in mind in which an answer
> can be almost correct, but if one presents itself such an answer will
> be worth 1 point.
 
I am certain that either Mark Brader or myself will find a way to only rate a single point
 
> news; the Greeks placed it in Medusa's head and the Hebrew name
> translates as "Satan's head." It's commonly known today by its Arabic
> name, which is?
 
algol
 
> this huge supposed scientific breakthrough. No one could reproduce
> their results and while a few people still work on this today, most
> people in the field think there's nothing to it.
 
cold fusion
 
> 3. The most populous island in the world.
 
java (ah. light bulb time.)

> 4. This formerly common viral disease has as one of its chief symptoms
> the swelling of the parotid salivary glands.
 
mumps
 
> 5. This 17th-century French thinker made contributions to theology,
> the physical sciences, and mathematics. Among the latter was the first
> work on probability theory, about which he corresponded with Fermat.
 
pascal
 
> except for several Marx Brothers pictures. However, he wrote a number
> of notable songs, many in partnership with Bert Kalmar. (The answer is
> his professional name, not his original name.)
 
... ruby?
 
> 7. Edinburgh lies on the southern edge of this large estuary.
 
firth of forth
 
> 8. This 18th-century opera house in Milan is one of the best-known in
> the world.
 
la scala
 
> 9. This novel by Vladimir Nabokov takes place on an alternate Earth
> and is primarily concerned with an incestuous relationship.
 
ada
 
> 10. This was the stage name of a country comedian and musician. She
> appeared for many years at the Grand Ole Opry and on the television
> show Hee Haw.
 
minnie pearl
 
 
 
swp, who is still on earth despite all evidence to the contrary
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