Friday, December 09, 2016

Digest for rec.games.trivia@googlegroups.com - 23 updates in 6 topics

"Chris F.A. Johnson" <cfajohnson@cfaj.ca>: Dec 09 12:01AM -0500

On 2016-11-28, Chris F.A. Johnson wrote:
>> one. Only one answer is allowed per question.
 
>> Entries must be posted by Friday, November 25, 2016.
 
> Results will be posted shortly, probably tomorrow.
 
My continued apologies. I have been under the weather and am still not
feeling great. (Mark, that's the only thing that would keep me away
from the Final.)
 
I hope to have the results up in a day or two.
 
--
Chris F.A. Johnson
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Dec 09 12:39AM -0600

Chris Johnson:
> My continued apologies. I have been under the weather and am still not
> feeling great. (Mark, that's the only thing that would keep me away
> from the Final.)
 
While Chris was posting the above, I was attempting to see if I could
figure out who had won, but as I mentioned to him in email, it's
going to depend on some judgement calls (and perhaps on tiebreaking),
so I can't provide a definitive answer. If Chris hadn't turned up
I was going to suggest seeing what others in the group thought.
 
However -- in case Chris finds it more useful to start from this
posting than to score the contest from scratch -- here's what I
worked out. (Posted and emailed.)
 
 
1. A brood (as of pheasants)
 
Dan Blum said pea; I said aitch; Gareth guessed gee. As far as
I can tell all three are wrong and the correct answer is "eye".
(This is not the same word as the visual organ, but an alteration
of an older word "nie" or "nye".)
 
2. A city on the east coast of Scotland, once known for fishing, but
now for oil, sits at the mouth of two rivers, the Don and the ?
 
The city of Aberdeen is centered between the Don and the Dee.
Dan Blum, Peter, I, Gareth, Calvin, and Marc got this.
 
Other answers given were Ayr and Key, neither of which sounds like
a letter of the alphabet.
 
3. A member of the order Hymenoptera.
 
Hymenoptera include bees, wasps, ants, ichneumon flies, and sawflies,
but obviously the one we want here is the bee. Dan Blum, Peter, I,
Gareth, Dan Tilque, Calvin, and Marc got this.
 
4. A river that rises in Somerset and flows south to the English Channel
 
According to Google Maps, the river Exe begins somewhere northwest of
Simonsbath in Exmoor National Park, near the western tip of Somerset,
and flows south to the English Channel at Exmouth. I and Gareth
got this.
 
Peter and Calvin said "Ex" and considering the nature of this contest,
I don't know whether this should be considered acceptable.
 
Dan Blum and Marc said Wye; this is the answer to #8 and if there's
another river of that name that would answer this question then
I'm not aware of it.
 
Other answers given were Channel and Key, neither of which sounds
like a letter of the alphabet.
 
5. A support for a ball
 
Obviously a tee, as in golf or football. Dan Blum, Pete, I, Gareth,
Dan Tilque, Erland, Calvin, and Marc got this.
 
6. In printing, 1/6 of an inch
 
I explained: "I believe you want the em. This is normally a relative
unit: when 12-point type is in use, em is correct, but with 24-point
type, en is correct. But I think it is also occasionally used in
the manner described. A better answer is to the question as written
is pica." Taking "em" as the correct answer, Dan Blum, Pete, I,
Gareth, Dan Tilque, and Calvin got this.
 
Peter and Erland said "en", which I don't think should be accepted.
 
Marc said "pica", which is correct but does not sound like a letter
of the alphabet.
 
7. Star of the 1955 movie, "The Court Jester"
 
Danny Kaye. Dan Blum, Pete, I, Gareth, Calvin, and Marc got this.
 
Other answers given were Oh and Dee. Nobody with those surnames was
in the movie according to the IMDB. They do list as an uncredited
cast member a Chad Block, whose middle name was Dee (and curiously
the IMDB lists him as "Chad Dee Block" even though they show no
screen credits with the middle name), but he clearly didn't star in
the movie.
 
8. A river that rises in Wales and joins the River Severn at Chepstow
 
This is the Wye. Google Maps shows it beginning somewhere northwest
of Pant Mawr in Wales, and it does flow into the Severn at Chepstow.
Peter, I, Gareth, Dan Tilque, and Marc got this.
 
Other answers given include Ell, Ex, and again, Key, which does not
sound like a letter of the alphabet.
 
9. The first chief justice of SCOTUS
 
SCOTUS means the Supreme Court of the United States, whose first
chief justice was John Jay. Dan Blum, Peter, Pete, I, Gareth,
Dan Tilque, and Marc got this.
 
Other answers given were Aitch and Dee.
 
10. The jurisdiction of a bishop.
 
A see. everyone -- Dan Blum, Peter, Pete, I, Gareth, Dan Tilque,
Erland, Calvin, and Marc -- got this.
 
11. What The Seekers knew they would never find another of
 
You. Pete, I, Gareth, Erland, and Marc got this.
 
Another answer given was "why". Google finds *no* hits where the
words "never find another why" occur consecutively within a single
sentence, so I think we can rule that one out.
 
12. This typically though not exclusively Canadian word ends a
sentence, turning it into a question.
 
Eh. Dan Blum, Pete, I, Gareth, Dan Tilque, Calvin, and Marc got this.
 
Another answer given was "are", which is not placed at the end of
a sentence to turn it into a question.
 
13. To form a line
 
Queue. Everyone got this.
 
14. Turn to the off side
 
"The off side" is the right, in what's primarily a British usage; and
"gee" can mean to turn to the right. Both terms are used with horses.
I, Gareth, Dan Tilque, and Marc got this.
 
Other answers given were "eye", which does not seem to be correct,
and "veer", which does not sound like a letter of the alphabet.
 
 
15. Feminine suffix
 
This one is the most problematic -- 5 different answers were givne
and there is a case for each of them.
 
Dan Blum, Peter, Pete, and Dan Tilque said "-ess". This is clearly
a correct answers, as in "hostess", and I'm guessing it was the
intended answer.
 
Marc said "-enne". This is mostly a French suffix, but the question
was not explicitly limited to English, and it notably occurs in the
English word "comedienne".
 
I and Calvin said "-elle". This is also mostly French, and it's
clearly a feminine suffix in French; it also occurs in a few English
words such as "organelle", but is not feminine in those words.
 
Gareth said "-ee". English has feminine words such as "fiancee"
and "divorcee" that end in -ee, but it's really only the second E
that's a suffix making them feminine. These words come directly
from French and the same applies in that language.
 
Finally, Erland said "-a", which is certainly a feminine ending in
Latin and some languages derived from it, and shows up in English
in Latin-based words like "alumna".
 
 
So counting only the points that are clearly correct, we have:
 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 TOTALS
 
Mark Brader 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 11
Gareth Owen 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 11
Marc Dashevsky 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 10
Dan Blum 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 8
Pete Gayde 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 7
Dan Tilque 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 7
"Calvin" 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 7
Peter Smyth 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 6
Erland Sommarskog 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 4
 
0 6 7 2 8 0 6 5 7 9 5 7 9 0 0
 
Several entrants have chances at additional points depending on what's
accepted, but as to the three leading scorers:
 
* I could rise to 12 if "-elle" is accepted for #15.
* Gareth could rise to 12 if "-ee" is accepted for #15.
* And Marc could rise to 11 if "-enne" is accepted for #15, or if
there is a river Wye in England that meets the criteria of #4,
or to 12 if both of thiese apply.
 
* And, of course, I could have missed something.
--
Mark Brader | "It never occurred to me that a living person could be
Toronto | used as a blowtorch, but we admit human beings are a
msb@vex.net | bit special, don't we?" --Hal Clement: STILL RIVER
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
Dan Tilque <dtilque@frontier.com>: Dec 09 12:40AM -0800

Mark Brader wrote:
 
 
> * And, of course, I could have missed something.
 
You mean besides not giving credit for #6 and #14?
 
 
--
Dan Tilque
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Dec 09 03:32AM -0600

Mark Brader:
> > * And, of course, I could have missed something.
 
Dan Tilque:
> You mean besides not giving credit for #6 and #14?
 
Yes, in fact! I also missed that I didn't give credit for the clearly
correct "-ess" on #15. Sorry about that -- basically this was the
result of carelessness as I jammed someone else's contest into my
scoring mechanisms.
 
Sorry about that, Chief. Here's the corrected score table:
 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 TOTALS
 
Mark Brader 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 13
Gareth Owen 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 13
Marc Dashevsky 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 11
Dan Blum 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 10
Dan Tilque 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 10
Pete Gayde 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 9
"Calvin" 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 8
Peter Smyth 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 7
Erland Sommarskog 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 4
 
0 6 7 2 8 6 6 5 7 9 5 7 9 4 4
 
Now,
 
* I could rise to 14 if "-elle" is accepted for #15.
* Gareth could rise to 14 if "-ee" is accepted for #15.
* And Marc could rise to 12 if "-enne" is accepted for #15, or if
there is a river Wye in England that meets the criteria of #4,
or to 13 if both of thiese apply.
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "I've always wanted to be a mad scientist!
msb@vex.net | Or perhaps just mad!" -- Robert L. Biddle
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
Calvin <334152@gmail.com>: Dec 08 06:08PM -0800

1 Which actor portrayed lawyer Tom Hagen in the Godfather films?
2 Eric Clapton, Jack Bruce and Ginger Baker comprised which rock group?
3 Which word can refer to either a fruit or calcium oxide (CaO)?
4 Which car manufacturer's logo features three diamonds?
5 The Hittites were an ancient Anatolian people whose empire centred on the city of Hattusa located in which modern-day country?
6 What is the most widely spoken language in Switzerland?
7 Which hit song of 1973 includes the following line: "Clowns to the left of me, Jokers to the right"?
8 What was the title of American relationship counsellor John Gray's 1992 best-seller?
9 Founded in 1876 in Baltimore and named after its benefactor, which US university is often known by the acronym JHU?
10 Idi Amin died in 2003 in which Middle-East country?
 
 
I'm away for a week so this won't be marked before 19 December.
 
cheers,
calvin
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Dec 08 11:01PM -0600

"Calvin":
> 1 Which actor portrayed lawyer Tom Hagen in the Godfather films?
 
No doubt a very well known one.
 
> 2 Eric Clapton, Jack Bruce and Ginger Baker comprised which rock group?
 
No doubt a very well known one.
 
> 3 Which word can refer to either a fruit or calcium oxide (CaO)?
 
Lime.
 
> 4 Which car manufacturer's logo features three diamonds?
 
Mitsubishi. Which, I believe, means "Three Diamonds".
 
> 5 The Hittites were an ancient Anatolian people whose empire
> centred on the city of Hattusa located in which modern-day
> country?
 
Anatolian? It had better be Turkey.
 
> 6 What is the most widely spoken language in Switzerland?
 
German. Or Schweitzerdeutsch, if you prefer.
 
> 7 Which hit song of 1973 includes the following line: "Clowns to
> the left of me, Jokers to the right"?
 
No doubt a very well known one.
 
> 8 What was the title of American relationship counsellor John
> Gray's 1992 best-seller?
 
"Men are from Mars, Women are from Venus".
 
> 9 Founded in 1876 in Baltimore and named after its benefactor,
> which US university is often known by the acronym JHU?
 
Johns Hopkins University. With one S in each word.
 
> 10 Idi Amin died in 2003 in which Middle-East country?

Saudi Arabia?

> I'm away for a week so this won't be marked before 19 December.
 
Have a good time, if applicable.
--
Mark Brader | "Forgive me if I misunderstood myself, but
Toronto | I don't think I was arguing in favour of that..."
msb@vex.net | -- Geoff Butler
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
"Chris F.A. Johnson" <cfajohnson@cfaj.ca>: Dec 08 11:57PM -0500

On 2016-12-09, Calvin wrote:
 
> 1 Which actor portrayed lawyer Tom Hagen in the Godfather films?
> 2 Eric Clapton, Jack Bruce and Ginger Baker comprised which rock group?
 
Creme
 
> 3 Which word can refer to either a fruit or calcium oxide (CaO)?
 
Lime
 
> 4 Which car manufacturer's logo features three diamonds?
 
Mitsubishi
 
> 5 The Hittites were an ancient Anatolian people whose empire centred on the city of Hattusa located in which modern-day country?
 
Turkey
 
> 6 What is the most widely spoken language in Switzerland?
 
French
 
> 7 Which hit song of 1973 includes the following line: "Clowns to the left of me, Jokers to the right"?
 
Stuck in the Middle with You
 
> 8 What was the title of American relationship counsellor John Gray's 1992 best-seller?
 
"Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus"
 
> 9 Founded in 1876 in Baltimore and named after its benefactor, which US university is often known by the acronym JHU?
 
Johns Hopkins U.
 
> 10 Idi Amin died in 2003 in which Middle-East country?
 
Saudi Arabia
 
--
Chris F.A. Johnson
Gareth Owen <gwowen@gmail.com>: Dec 09 06:18AM


> 1 Which actor portrayed lawyer Tom Hagen in the Godfather films?
 
Robert Duvall (a good peacetime Consiglieri)
 
> 2 Eric Clapton, Jack Bruce and Ginger Baker comprised which rock
> group?
 
Cream
 
> 3 Which word can refer to either a fruit or calcium oxide (CaO)?
 
Lime
 
> 4 Which car manufacturer's logo features three diamonds?
 
Mitsubishi
 
> 5 The Hittites were an ancient Anatolian people whose empire centred
> on the city of Hattusa located in which modern-day country?
 
When in doubt, say Syria
 
> 6 What is the most widely spoken language in Switzerland?
 
French?
 
> 7 Which hit song of 1973 includes the following line: "Clowns to the
> left of me, Jokers to the right"?
 
Stuck in the middle with you (Stealers Wheel)
 
> 8 What was the title of American relationship counsellor John Gray's
> 1992 best-seller?
 
Men Are From Mars, Women Are From Venus
 
> 9 Founded in 1876 in Baltimore and named after its benefactor, which
> US university is often known by the acronym JHU?
 
Johns Hopkins University
 
> 10 Idi Amin died in 2003 in which Middle-East country?
 
Saudi Arabia?
Dan Tilque <dtilque@frontier.com>: Dec 09 12:23AM -0800

Calvin wrote:
> 1 Which actor portrayed lawyer Tom Hagen in the Godfather films?
> 2 Eric Clapton, Jack Bruce and Ginger Baker comprised which rock group?
 
Derek and the Dominoes
 
> 3 Which word can refer to either a fruit or calcium oxide (CaO)?
 
lime
 
> 4 Which car manufacturer's logo features three diamonds?
 
Mitsubishi
 
> 5 The Hittites were an ancient Anatolian people whose empire centred on the city of Hattusa located in which modern-day country?
 
Turkey
 
> 6 What is the most widely spoken language in Switzerland?
 
German
 
> 7 Which hit song of 1973 includes the following line: "Clowns to the left of me, Jokers to the right"?
 
Stuck in the Middle with You
 
> 8 What was the title of American relationship counsellor John Gray's 1992 best-seller?
 
Men are from Mars, Women are from Venus
 
(I was severely tempted to answer "49 Shades of Gray")
 
> 9 Founded in 1876 in Baltimore and named after its benefactor, which US university is often known by the acronym JHU?
 
Johns Hopkins University
 
> 10 Idi Amin died in 2003 in which Middle-East country?
 
United Arab Emirates ??
 
 
--
Dan Tilque
Calvin <334152@gmail.com>: Dec 08 05:48PM -0800

On Thursday, December 8, 2016 at 2:17:51 PM UTC+10, Mark Brader wrote:
 
> > E2. Name the runner whose record of 10.62 s for the women's
> > 100 m has stood since 1988.
 
I guess this refers to the *Olympic* record even though it is not explicitly stated in the question. Flo-Jo's *world* record is 10.49 and has stood for almost 30 years.
 
http://www.alltime-athletics.com/w_100ok.htm
 
cheers,
calvin
Calvin <334152@gmail.com>: Dec 08 05:55PM -0800

On Thursday, December 8, 2016 at 2:17:51 PM UTC+10, Mark Brader wrote:

 
> > E1. What is Usain Bolt's Olympic record time for the 100 m run,
> > set in 2012? Exact answer required.
 
> 9.63 s.
 
I respectfully suggest that whoever wrote this question be taken out and shot.
 
cheers,
calvin
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Dec 08 10:53PM -0600

Mark Brader:
>>> E2. Name the runner whose record of 10.62 s for the women's
>>> 100 m has stood since 1988.

"Calvin":
> I guess this refers to the *Olympic* record even though it is not
> explicitly stated in the question.
 
It was the Olympic challenge round, remember?
--
Mark Brader | "I had never thought of Jesus as being
msb@vex.net | a variety of grape plant, but
Toronto | if you put it that way..." --Jan Sand
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Dec 08 10:57PM -0600

Mark Brader:
 
>>> E1. What is Usain Bolt's Olympic record time for the 100 m run,
>>> set in 2012? Exact answer required.
 
>> 9.63 s.

"Calvin":
> I respectfully suggest that whoever wrote this question be taken out
> and shot.
 
Huh? That is the correct Olympic record for this very high-profile event.
--
Mark Brader "The people have spoken...
Toronto And they must be punished!"
msb@vex.net --Ed Koch, after not being reelected, 1989
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
Calvin <334152@gmail.com>: Dec 08 06:03PM -0800

On Friday, December 2, 2016 at 2:50:31 PM UTC+10, Calvin wrote:
 
> 1 Which reality TV show has been set in Orange County, Beverly Hills, New York and Miami among others?
 
The Real Housewives of...
 
> 2 Head brand goods are primarily associated with which sport?
 
Tennis
 
> 3 The disease quinsy is inflammation of which part of the human body?
 
Tonsils
 
> 4 In what language was "The Communist Manifesto" written?
 
German
 
> 5 Which planet did JG Galle discover it in 1846?
 
Neptune is the expected answer. Refer to Mark and Dan's comments for more detail.
 
> 6 How many arrondissements does Paris have?
 
20
 
> 7 "The Bare Necessities" is a song from which 1967 Disney animated film?
 
The Jungle Book
 
> 8 What is the capital city of Bali?
 
Denpasar
No one got this.
 
> 9 The "Ode to Joy" is part of the final movement of which Beethoven symphony?
 
Ninth / Choral
 
> 10 Which British university is known by the acronym KCL?
 
King's College, London
But Potassium Chloride uni made me laugh :-)
 
 
Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q5 Q6 Q7 Q8 Q9 Q10 TOTAL TB Quiz 466
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 8 0 Mark Brader
1 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 7 0 Pete Gayde
1 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 6 0 Marc Dashevsky
1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 6 0 Dan Tilque
0 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 6 0 Chris Johnson
1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 4 0 Bjorn Lundin
0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 4 0 Erland S
- - - - - - - - - - --- ----------
5 5 3 4 5 3 6 0 7 3 41 59%
 
 
Congratulations Mark!
 
cheers,
Calvin
bbowler <bbowler@bigelow.org>: Dec 08 12:59PM

On Wed, 07 Dec 2016 22:19:24 -0600, Mark Brader wrote:
 
> of several villages including Sharon and Holland Landing.
 
> 2. An Indiana city on the St. Joseph River. In 1852, Henry
> Studebaker set up his first wagon shop here.
 
South Bend
 
> which was officially retired in 2003 -- identified it as the home of
> the southern Slavs.
 
> 4. This former province achieved nationhood as Bangladesh in 1971.
 
East Pakistan
 
 
> 9. The name of the 6th-largest country in the world derives from
> the Latin for "Southern land." The name was first used officially in
> 1817.
 
Australia
 
> 10. This African country is the newest member of the United Nations,
> having gained admission in July 2011.
 
East Timor
 
 
> * Game 2, Round 3 - Sports - Sports in the Roaring Twenties
 
> 1. In 1924, which city hosted the Olympics for the second time?
 
Paris
 
 
> 4. Frenchwoman Suzanne Lenglen was the first female superstar in
> her sport, famous for her attire as well as her technique.
> What sport?
 
Tennis
 
> 5. In 1926, swimmer Gertrude Ederle ["ED-er-lee"] did *what* in
> 14 hours 34 minutes, faster than any of the men who preceded her?
 
Swam across the English channel
 
> 6. Which schooner, skippered by Angus Walters, won its first
> international races in 1921?
 
Bluenose
 
> in Detroit and another two in Philadelphia, before retiring as the
> holder of 43 major league regular season career records." Who is the
> Baseball Hall of Fame describing here?
 
Shoeless Joe Jackson
 
> 8. What was "the house that Ruth built"?
 
Yankee Stadium
 
 
> 10. In the years 1920 to '29 inclusive, which team won the Stanley
> Cup 4 times, more often than any other team? Hint: the answer is
> also the name of a current NHL team.
 
Canadiens
"Peter Smyth" <smythp@gmail.com>: Dec 08 07:39PM

Mark Brader wrote:
 
> of several villages including Sharon and Holland Landing.
 
> 2. An Indiana city on the St. Joseph River. In 1852, Henry
> Studebaker set up his first wagon shop here.
East St Louis
> 3. This country was born in 1918. The name it later adopted --
> which was officially retired in 2003 -- identified it as the
> home of the southern Slavs.
Yugoslavia
> 4. This former province achieved nationhood as Bangladesh in 1971.
East Pakistan
> 5. This northwest German region includes the cities of Munster
> and Dortmund. The treaty ending the 30 Years' War was signed
> here.
Westphalia
> Monte-Carlo-style "Formula E" electric-car races.
 
> 7. One of the main Japanese islands; its name means "North Ocean
> Road".
Hokkaido
> 8. The name of this Chinese city literally translates as "South
> Capital".
Shanghai
> 9. The name of the 6th-largest country in the world derives from
> the Latin for "Southern land." The name was first used
> officially in 1817.
Australia
> 10. This African country is the newest member of the United Nations,
> having gained admission in July 2011.
South Sudan
 
> * Game 2, Round 3 - Sports - Sports in the Roaring Twenties
 
> 1. In 1924, which city hosted the Olympics for the second time?
Paris
 
> 4. Frenchwoman Suzanne Lenglen was the first female superstar in
> her sport, famous for her attire as well as her technique.
> What sport?
Tennis
> 5. In 1926, swimmer Gertrude Ederle ["ED-er-lee"] did what in
> 14 hours 34 minutes, faster than any of the men who preceded her?
Swum the English Channel
> and British Open Championships in the same year, 1926. After
> retirement in 1930, he co-founded the Masters Tournament.
> Name him.
Bobby Jones
> 10. In the years 1920 to '29 inclusive, which team won the Stanley
> Cup 4 times, more often than any other team? Hint: the answer
> is also the name of a current NHL team.
Detroit Red Wings
 
Peter Smyth
Gareth Owen <gwowen@gmail.com>: Dec 08 07:57PM


> 2. An Indiana city on the St. Joseph River. In 1852, Henry
> Studebaker set up his first wagon shop here.
 
South Bend?
 
> 3. This country was born in 1918. The name it later adopted --
> which was officially retired in 2003 -- identified it as the
> home of the southern Slavs.
 
Yugo Slavia
 
> 4. This former province achieved nationhood as Bangladesh in 1971.
 
East Pakistan
 
> 5. This northwest German region includes the cities of Munster
> and Dortmund. The treaty ending the 30 Years' War was signed
> here.
 
Westphalia
 
> Monte-Carlo-style "Formula E" electric-car races.
 
> 7. One of the main Japanese islands; its name means "North Ocean
> Road".
 
Hon-shu
 
> 8. The name of this Chinese city literally translates as "South
> Capital".
 
Nanjing?
 
> 9. The name of the 6th-largest country in the world derives from
> the Latin for "Southern land." The name was first used
> officially in 1817.
 
Australia. ("Southern Land" is also a literal translation of Vietnam,
which I think means they're the only two countries with a common name,
modulo language).
 
> 10. This African country is the newest member of the United Nations,
> having gained admission in July 2011.
 
South Sudan
 
> * Game 2, Round 3 - Sports - Sports in the Roaring Twenties
 
> 1. In 1924, which city hosted the Olympics for the second time?
 
Paris
 
> 2. Thoroughbred racehorse Man o'War won 20 out of 21 races he was
> entered in. His last victory, in October 1920, was at Kenilworth
> Park -- in which Ontario city?
 
Toronto. Ok, I'm all out of Ontario cities
 
> 3. On the basis of his football achievements at the University of
> Illinois, "Time" magazine put Red Grange on its cover in October
> 1925. Next month Grange turned pro, signing with which NFL team?
 
Bears, Giants
 
> 4. Frenchwoman Suzanne Lenglen was the first female superstar in
> her sport, famous for her attire as well as her technique.
> What sport?
 
Tennis
 
> 5. In 1926, swimmer Gertrude Ederle ["ED-er-lee"] did *what* in
> 14 hours 34 minutes, faster than any of the men who preceded her?
 
Swam the English Channel
 
> 6. Which schooner, skippered by Angus Walters, won its first
> international races in 1921?
 
"America"
 
> in Detroit and another two in Philadelphia, before retiring as
> the holder of 43 major league regular season career records."
> Who is the Baseball Hall of Fame describing here?
 
Tyrus Raymond Cobb
 
> 8. What was "the house that Ruth built"?
 
The original Yankee Stadium
 
> and British Open Championships in the same year, 1926. After
> retirement in 1930, he co-founded the Masters Tournament.
> Name him.
 
Bobby Jones
 
> 10. In the years 1920 to '29 inclusive, which team won the Stanley
> Cup 4 times, more often than any other team? Hint: the answer
> is also the name of a current NHL team.
 
Montreal Canadiens.
Erland Sommarskog <esquel@sommarskog.se>: Dec 08 09:33PM +0100

> 3. This country was born in 1918. The name it later adopted --
> which was officially retired in 2003 -- identified it as the
> home of the southern Slavs.
 
Yugoslavia. Although that name was not used officially until 1929.

> 4. This former province achieved nationhood as Bangladesh in 1971.
 
East Pakistan

> 5. This northwest German region includes the cities of Munster
> and Dortmund. The treaty ending the 30 Years' War was signed
> here.
 
Nordrhein-Westfalen

> 6. Glamorous Uruguayan ocean resort, known recently for its
> Monte-Carlo-style "Formula E" electric-car races.
 
Punta del Este

> 7. One of the main Japanese islands; its name means "North Ocean
> Road".
 
Hokkiado

> 8. The name of this Chinese city literally translates as "South
> Capital".
 
Nanjing

> 9. The name of the 6th-largest country in the world derives from
> the Latin for "Southern land." The name was first used
> officially in 1817.
 
Australia

> 10. This African country is the newest member of the United Nations,
> having gained admission in July 2011.
 
South Sudan

> * Game 2, Round 3 - Sports - Sports in the Roaring Twenties
 
> 1. In 1924, which city hosted the Olympics for the second time?
 
Paris

> 4. Frenchwoman Suzanne Lenglen was the first female superstar in
> her sport, famous for her attire as well as her technique.
> What sport?
 
Figureskating

> 5. In 1926, swimmer Gertrude Ederle ["ED-er-lee"] did *what* in
> 14 hours 34 minutes, faster than any of the men who preceded her?
 
Crossed the English Channel

> in Detroit and another two in Philadelphia, before retiring as
> the holder of 43 major league regular season career records."
> Who is the Baseball Hall of Fame describing here?
 
Babe Ruth

> 8. What was "the house that Ruth built"?
 
Hm, maybe the previous out-of-the-blue guess was wrong. Oh well.

> 10. In the years 1920 to '29 inclusive, which team won the Stanley
> Cup 4 times, more often than any other team? Hint: the answer
> is also the name of a current NHL team.
 
 
Montréal Canadiens
 
 
--
Erland Sommarskog, Stockholm, esquel@sommarskog.se
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Dec 08 03:32PM -0600

Mark Brader:
> > 9. The name of the 6th-largest country in the world derives from
> > the Latin for "Southern land." The name was first used
> > officially in 1817.

Gareth Owen:
> Australia. ("Southern Land" is also a literal translation of Vietnam,
> which I think means they're the only two countries with a common name,
> modulo language).
 
Really! Which also means that "North Vietnam" was sort of oxymoronic.
(Of course that's not what they ever called the country themselves.)
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "The only proven use of antimatter is the production
msb@vex.net | of Nobel Prizes in physics." -- Henry Spencer
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Dec 08 03:32PM -0600

Mark Brader:
>> 3. This country was born in 1918. The name it later adopted --
>> which was officially retired in 2003 -- identified it as the
>> home of the southern Slavs.

Erland Sommarskog:
> Yugoslavia. Although that name was not used officially until 1929.
 
And that would be later, wouldn't it?
 
(I added that bit, by the way.)
--
Mark Brader, Toronto "Logic is logic. That's all I say."
msb@vex.net -- Oliver Wendell Holmes
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
Calvin <334152@gmail.com>: Dec 08 05:54PM -0800

On Thursday, December 8, 2016 at 2:19:29 PM UTC+10, Mark Brader wrote:

> the word "north", "south", "east", or "west" -- *in some language*.
 
> 1. This Ontario town was incorporated in 1971 with the amalgamation
> of several villages including Sharon and Holland Landing.
 
Medicine Hat du Nord
 
> 2. An Indiana city on the St. Joseph River. In 1852, Henry
> Studebaker set up his first wagon shop here.
 
If it ain't Indianapolis ...
 
> 3. This country was born in 1918. The name it later adopted --
> which was officially retired in 2003 -- identified it as the
> home of the southern Slavs.
 
Yugoslavia
 
> 4. This former province achieved nationhood as Bangladesh in 1971.
 
East Pakistan
 
> 5. This northwest German region includes the cities of Munster
> and Dortmund. The treaty ending the 30 Years' War was signed
> here.
 
North Rhine Westphalia
 
> Monte-Carlo-style "Formula E" electric-car races.
 
> 7. One of the main Japanese islands; its name means "North Ocean
> Road".
 
Hokkaido

> 8. The name of this Chinese city literally translates as "South
> Capital".
 
Beijing, Guangzhou
 
> 9. The name of the 6th-largest country in the world derives from
> the Latin for "Southern land." The name was first used
> officially in 1817.
 
Australia
 
> 10. This African country is the newest member of the United Nations,
> having gained admission in July 2011.
 
South Sudan
 
 

> * Game 2, Round 3 - Sports - Sports in the Roaring Twenties
 
> 1. In 1924, which city hosted the Olympics for the second time?
 
Paris
 
> 2. Thoroughbred racehorse Man o'War won 20 out of 21 races he was
> entered in. His last victory, in October 1920, was at Kenilworth
> Park -- in which Ontario city?
 
London, Ontario
 
> 3. On the basis of his football achievements at the University of
> Illinois, "Time" magazine put Red Grange on its cover in October
> 1925. Next month Grange turned pro, signing with which NFL team?
 
Browns
 
> 4. Frenchwoman Suzanne Lenglen was the first female superstar in
> her sport, famous for her attire as well as her technique.
> What sport?
 
Tennis
 
> 5. In 1926, swimmer Gertrude Ederle ["ED-er-lee"] did *what* in
> 14 hours 34 minutes, faster than any of the men who preceded her?
 
English Channel
 
> in Detroit and another two in Philadelphia, before retiring as
> the holder of 43 major league regular season career records."
> Who is the Baseball Hall of Fame describing here?
 
Cobb
 
> 8. What was "the house that Ruth built"?
 
Yankee Stadium
one of them anyway
 
> and British Open Championships in the same year, 1926. After
> retirement in 1930, he co-founded the Masters Tournament.
> Name him.
 
Jones
 
> 10. In the years 1920 to '29 inclusive, which team won the Stanley
> Cup 4 times, more often than any other team? Hint: the answer
> is also the name of a current NHL team.
 
Rangers, Bruins
 
cheers,
calvin
bbowler <bbowler@bigelow.org>: Dec 08 12:51PM

On Wed, 07 Dec 2016 15:22:08 -0600, Mark Brader wrote:
 
 
> * International News
 
> 1. Which former astronaut has been evacuated from the South Pole
> because of illness?
 
Aldrin
 
 
> * Sports
 
> 7. Name the man who won the F1 driving championship, then shocked
> the sport 5 days later by retiring at 31.
 
Nico Rossberg
 
 
> 13. Donald Trump made a deal with a US manufacturer to keep 1,000
> jobs in Indiana instead of moving production to Mexico.
> Name the manufacturer Trump pressured.
 
Carrier
 
> Canada last week, competitor Netflix introduced which new feature?
 
> 15. McDonald's franchise owner Michael "Jim" Delligatti died
> last week. With what 1967 innovation is he credited?
 
Big Mac
"Peter Smyth" <smythp@gmail.com>: Dec 08 07:33PM

Mark Brader wrote:
 
 
> * International News
 
> 1. Which former astronaut has been evacuated from the South Pole
> because of illness?
Buzz Aldrin
> 2. The president, democratically elected in 2012 and now accused
> of influence peddling, has offered to step down to avoid an
> impeachment vote -- in which country?
South Korea
 
> * Sports
 
> 7. Name the man who won the F1 driving championship, then shocked
> the sport 5 days later by retiring at 31.
Nico Rosberg
> 8. Which 41-year-old was named MVP of the Grey Cup?
 
> 9. TFC won the eastern division of MLS and will now face which
> team in the final?
LA Galaxy
 
> 14. While Amazon launched its Prime video streaming service in
> Canada last week, competitor Netflix introduced which new
> feature?
Downloads
> 15. McDonald's franchise owner Michael "Jim" Delligatti died
> last week. With what 1967 innovation is he credited?
Big Mac
 
Peter Smyth
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Thursday, December 08, 2016

Digest for rec.games.trivia@googlegroups.com - 17 updates in 4 topics

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Dec 07 03:22PM -0600

These questions were written to be asked in Toronto on 2016-12-06,
and should be interpreted accordingly. If any answers have changed
due to newer news, you are still expected to give the answers that
were correct on that date.
 
On each question you may give up to two answers, but if you give
both a right answer and a wrong answer, there is a small penalty.
Please post all your answers in a single followup to the newsgroup,
based only on your own knowledge. (In your answer posting, quote
the questions and place your answer below each one.) I will reveal
the correct answers in about 3 days.
 
All questions were written by members of the Misplaced Modifiers
and are used here by permission, but have been reformatted and may
have been retyped and/or edited by me. For further information
see my recent companion posting on "Questions from the Canadian
Inquisition (QFTCI*)".
 
As usual, this final current events round is running concurrently
with rounds from the regular season.
 
 
** Final, Round 1 - Current Events
 
Current Events: http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/f-1/ce.jpg
 
* International News
 
1. Which former astronaut has been evacuated from the South Pole
because of illness?
 
2. The president, democratically elected in 2012 and now accused
of influence peddling, has offered to step down to avoid an
impeachment vote -- in which country?
 
3. Name the Sioux Native American Indian *reservation* where a
group of US veterans joined protesters against an oil pipeline.
 
 
* Local News
 
4. Which newly-elected Ontario MPP delayed being sworn in until
after the legislature voted on the All Families Are Equal Act?
 
5. A new box-office record has been set for the Royal Alexandra
Theatre with 1-week ticket sales of over $1,700,000. Name the
play, which recounts how the people of Gander dealt with the
air passengers stranded there by the 9/11 attacks.
 
6. "Toronto Life" magazine released their "Toronto's 50 Most
Influential" list. Their #1 choice isn't even from the "6".
Who is their #1 pick?
 
 
* Sports
 
7. Name the man who won the F1 driving championship, then shocked
the sport 5 days later by retiring at 31.
 
8. Which 41-year-old was named MVP of the Grey Cup?
 
9. TFC won the eastern division of MLS and will now face which
team in the final?
 
 
* National
 
10. Name the pilot of the CF-18 that crashed in Cold Lake, Alberta,
last week.
 
11. A Canadian Judicial Council inquiry gave 17 reasons that this
judge is unfit to remain on the bench -- among them, his remark
"Why couldn't you just keep your knees together?" What is
his name?
 
12. What Global News political correspondent announced his
retirement from journalism last week?
 
 
* Business
 
13. Donald Trump made a deal with a US manufacturer to keep 1,000
jobs in Indiana instead of moving production to Mexico.
Name the manufacturer Trump pressured.
 
14. While Amazon launched its Prime video streaming service in
Canada last week, competitor Netflix introduced which new
feature?
 
15. McDonald's franchise owner Michael "Jim" Delligatti died
last week. With what 1967 innovation is he credited?
 
--
Mark Brader | "If the standard says that [things] depend on the
Toronto | phase of the moon, the programmer should be prepared
msb@vex.net | to look out the window as necessary." -- Chris Torek
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
tool@panix.com (Dan Blum): Dec 07 09:55PM


> * International News
 
> 1. Which former astronaut has been evacuated from the South Pole
> because of illness?
 
Buzz Aldrin
 
> 2. The president, democratically elected in 2012 and now accused
> of influence peddling, has offered to step down to avoid an
> impeachment vote -- in which country?
 
Italy
 
> 3. Name the Sioux Native American Indian *reservation* where a
> group of US veterans joined protesters against an oil pipeline.
 
Standing Rock
 
 
> 13. Donald Trump made a deal with a US manufacturer to keep 1,000
> jobs in Indiana instead of moving production to Mexico.
> Name the manufacturer Trump pressured.
 
Carrier
 
> 15. McDonald's franchise owner Michael "Jim" Delligatti died
> last week. With what 1967 innovation is he credited?
 
Big Mac
 
--
_______________________________________________________________________
Dan Blum tool@panix.com
"I wouldn't have believed it myself if I hadn't just made it up."
Erland Sommarskog <esquel@sommarskog.se>: Dec 07 11:05PM +0100

> 1. Which former astronaut has been evacuated from the South Pole
> because of illness?
 
Buzz Aldrin

> 2. The president, democratically elected in 2012 and now accused
> of influence peddling, has offered to step down to avoid an
> impeachment vote -- in which country?
 
South Korea

> 3. Name the Sioux Native American Indian *reservation* where a
> group of US veterans joined protesters against an oil pipeline.
 
It was in North Dakota, but that is not going to give me very many
points.
 
> 7. Name the man who won the F1 driving championship, then shocked
> the sport 5 days later by retiring at 31.
 
Nico Rosberg

> 9. TFC won the eastern division of MLS and will now face which
> team in the final?
 
Seattle Sounders

 
 
 
--
Erland Sommarskog, Stockholm, esquel@sommarskog.se
Joshua Kreitzer <gromit82@hotmail.com>: Dec 08 02:02AM

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote in news:Ma-dnZ1BWMYd4NXFnZ2dnUU7-
 
> * International News
 
> 1. Which former astronaut has been evacuated from the South Pole
> because of illness?
 
Buzz Aldrin
 
> 2. The president, democratically elected in 2012 and now accused
> of influence peddling, has offered to step down to avoid an
> impeachment vote -- in which country?
 
South Korea

> 3. Name the Sioux Native American Indian *reservation* where a
> group of US veterans joined protesters against an oil pipeline.
 
Standing Rock

 
> 13. Donald Trump made a deal with a US manufacturer to keep 1,000
> jobs in Indiana instead of moving production to Mexico.
> Name the manufacturer Trump pressured.
 
Carrier
 
> 14. While Amazon launched its Prime video streaming service in
> Canada last week, competitor Netflix introduced which new
> feature?
 
downloadable video

> 15. McDonald's franchise owner Michael "Jim" Delligatti died
> last week. With what 1967 innovation is he credited?
 
Big Mac
 
--
Joshua Kreitzer
gromit82@hotmail.com
Pete <pagrsg@wowway.com>: Dec 08 05:26AM

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote in news:Ma-dnZ1BWMYd4NXFnZ2dnUU7-
 
> * International News
 
> 1. Which former astronaut has been evacuated from the South Pole
> because of illness?
 
Buzz Aldrin
 
 
> 2. The president, democratically elected in 2012 and now accused
> of influence peddling, has offered to step down to avoid an
> impeachment vote -- in which country?
 
South Korea
 
 
> * Sports
 
> 7. Name the man who won the F1 driving championship, then shocked
> the sport 5 days later by retiring at 31.
 
Hamilton
 
 
> 8. Which 41-year-old was named MVP of the Grey Cup?
 
> 9. TFC won the eastern division of MLS and will now face which
> team in the final?
 
Seattle Sounders
 
 
> 13. Donald Trump made a deal with a US manufacturer to keep 1,000
> jobs in Indiana instead of moving production to Mexico.
> Name the manufacturer Trump pressured.
 
Carrier
 
> feature?
 
> 15. McDonald's franchise owner Michael "Jim" Delligatti died
> last week. With what 1967 innovation is he credited?
 
Big Mac
 
 
Pete Gayde
Dan Tilque <dtilque@frontier.com>: Dec 07 11:47PM -0800

Mark Brader wrote:
 
> * International News
 
> 1. Which former astronaut has been evacuated from the South Pole
> because of illness?
 
Buzz Aldrin
 
 
> 2. The president, democratically elected in 2012 and now accused
> of influence peddling, has offered to step down to avoid an
> impeachment vote -- in which country?
 
Israel
 
 
> 3. Name the Sioux Native American Indian *reservation* where a
> group of US veterans joined protesters against an oil pipeline.
 
Standing Rock
 
 
> 13. Donald Trump made a deal with a US manufacturer to keep 1,000
> jobs in Indiana instead of moving production to Mexico.
> Name the manufacturer Trump pressured.
 
Carrier
 
> feature?
 
> 15. McDonald's franchise owner Michael "Jim" Delligatti died
> last week. With what 1967 innovation is he credited?
 
Big Mac
 
 
--
Dan Tilque
Marc Dashevsky <usenet@MarcDashevsky.com>: Dec 08 02:28AM -0600

In article <Ma-dnZ1BWMYd4NXFnZ2dnUU7-b3NnZ2d@giganews.com>, msb@vex.net says...
> impeachment vote -- in which country?
 
> 3. Name the Sioux Native American Indian *reservation* where a
> group of US veterans joined protesters against an oil pipeline.
Standing Rock
 
 
> 13. Donald Trump made a deal with a US manufacturer to keep 1,000
> jobs in Indiana instead of moving production to Mexico.
> Name the manufacturer Trump pressured.
Carrier
 
> feature?
 
> 15. McDonald's franchise owner Michael "Jim" Delligatti died
> last week. With what 1967 innovation is he credited?
Big Mac
 
 
--
Replace "usenet" with "marc" in the e-mail address.
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Dec 07 10:19PM -0600

These questions were written to be asked in Toronto on 2016-09-26,
and should be interpreted accordingly.
 
On each question you may give up to two answers, but if you give
both a right answer and a wrong answer, there is a small penalty.
Please post all your answers to the newsgroup in a single followup,
based only on your own knowledge. (In your answer posting, quote
the questions and place your answer below each one.) I will reveal
the correct answers in about 3 days.
 
All questions were written by members of the Misplaced Modifiers
and are used here by permission, but have been reformatted and may
have been retyped and/or edited by me. For further information
see my 2016-11-26 companion posting on "Questions from the Canadian
Inquisition (QFTCI*)".
 
 
* Game 2, Round 2 - Geography - North, South, East, West
 
In each case, name the place we describe. All answers will contain
the word "north", "south", "east", or "west" -- *in some language*.
 
1. This Ontario town was incorporated in 1971 with the amalgamation
of several villages including Sharon and Holland Landing.
 
2. An Indiana city on the St. Joseph River. In 1852, Henry
Studebaker set up his first wagon shop here.
 
3. This country was born in 1918. The name it later adopted --
which was officially retired in 2003 -- identified it as the
home of the southern Slavs.
 
4. This former province achieved nationhood as Bangladesh in 1971.
 
5. This northwest German region includes the cities of Munster
and Dortmund. The treaty ending the 30 Years' War was signed
here.
 
6. Glamorous Uruguayan ocean resort, known recently for its
Monte-Carlo-style "Formula E" electric-car races.
 
7. One of the main Japanese islands; its name means "North Ocean
Road".
 
8. The name of this Chinese city literally translates as "South
Capital".
 
9. The name of the 6th-largest country in the world derives from
the Latin for "Southern land." The name was first used
officially in 1817.
 
10. This African country is the newest member of the United Nations,
having gained admission in July 2011.
 
 
* Game 2, Round 3 - Sports - Sports in the Roaring Twenties
 
1. In 1924, which city hosted the Olympics for the second time?
 
2. Thoroughbred racehorse Man o'War won 20 out of 21 races he was
entered in. His last victory, in October 1920, was at Kenilworth
Park -- in which Ontario city?
 
3. On the basis of his football achievements at the University of
Illinois, "Time" magazine put Red Grange on its cover in October
1925. Next month Grange turned pro, signing with which NFL team?
 
4. Frenchwoman Suzanne Lenglen was the first female superstar in
her sport, famous for her attire as well as her technique.
What sport?
 
5. In 1926, swimmer Gertrude Ederle ["ED-er-lee"] did *what* in
14 hours 34 minutes, faster than any of the men who preceded her?
 
6. Which schooner, skippered by Angus Walters, won its first
international races in 1921?
 
7. He "joined the Detroit Tigers in 1905. He spent 22 seasons
in Detroit and another two in Philadelphia, before retiring as
the holder of 43 major league regular season career records."
Who is the Baseball Hall of Fame describing here?
 
8. What was "the house that Ruth built"?
 
9. This amateur golfer was the first player to win both the US
and British Open Championships in the same year, 1926. After
retirement in 1930, he co-founded the Masters Tournament.
Name him.
 
10. In the years 1920 to '29 inclusive, which team won the Stanley
Cup 4 times, more often than any other team? Hint: the answer
is also the name of a current NHL team.
 
--
Mark Brader | "Life is mundane until it is not,
Toronto | and then the mundane can look serene."
msb@vex.net | --David Maraniss
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
tool@panix.com (Dan Blum): Dec 08 04:34AM


> * Game 2, Round 2 - Geography - North, South, East, West
 
> 2. An Indiana city on the St. Joseph River. In 1852, Henry
> Studebaker set up his first wagon shop here.
 
South Bend
 
> 3. This country was born in 1918. The name it later adopted --
> which was officially retired in 2003 -- identified it as the
> home of the southern Slavs.
 
Yugoslavia
 
> 4. This former province achieved nationhood as Bangladesh in 1971.
 
East Pakistan
 
> 5. This northwest German region includes the cities of Munster
> and Dortmund. The treaty ending the 30 Years' War was signed
> here.
 
Westphalia
 
> 7. One of the main Japanese islands; its name means "North Ocean
> Road".
 
Hokkaido
 
> 8. The name of this Chinese city literally translates as "South
> Capital".
 
Shanghai; Beijing
 
> 9. The name of the 6th-largest country in the world derives from
> the Latin for "Southern land." The name was first used
> officially in 1817.
 
Australia
 
> 10. This African country is the newest member of the United Nations,
> having gained admission in July 2011.
 
South Sudan
 
> * Game 2, Round 3 - Sports - Sports in the Roaring Twenties
 
> 1. In 1924, which city hosted the Olympics for the second time?
 
Paris; Athens
 
> 3. On the basis of his football achievements at the University of
> Illinois, "Time" magazine put Red Grange on its cover in October
> 1925. Next month Grange turned pro, signing with which NFL team?
 
Chicago Bears; Green Bay Packers
 
> 4. Frenchwoman Suzanne Lenglen was the first female superstar in
> her sport, famous for her attire as well as her technique.
> What sport?
 
tennis; golf
 
> 5. In 1926, swimmer Gertrude Ederle ["ED-er-lee"] did *what* in
> 14 hours 34 minutes, faster than any of the men who preceded her?
 
swim across the English Channel
 
> in Detroit and another two in Philadelphia, before retiring as
> the holder of 43 major league regular season career records."
> Who is the Baseball Hall of Fame describing here?
 
Ty Cobb
 
> 8. What was "the house that Ruth built"?
 
Yankee Stadium
 
--
_______________________________________________________________________
Dan Blum tool@panix.com
"I wouldn't have believed it myself if I hadn't just made it up."
Joshua Kreitzer <gromit82@hotmail.com>: Dec 08 04:40AM

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote in news:f-mdnXKg-u_RQtXFnZ2dnUU7-
> the word "north", "south", "east", or "west" -- *in some language*.
 
> 2. An Indiana city on the St. Joseph River. In 1852, Henry
> Studebaker set up his first wagon shop here.
 
South Bend
 
> 3. This country was born in 1918. The name it later adopted --
> which was officially retired in 2003 -- identified it as the
> home of the southern Slavs.
 
Yugoslavia

> 4. This former province achieved nationhood as Bangladesh in 1971.
 
East Pakistan
 
> 5. This northwest German region includes the cities of Munster
> and Dortmund. The treaty ending the 30 Years' War was signed
> here.
 
Westphalia

> 6. Glamorous Uruguayan ocean resort, known recently for its
> Monte-Carlo-style "Formula E" electric-car races.
 
Punta del Este
 
> 7. One of the main Japanese islands; its name means "North Ocean
> Road".
 
Hokkaido; Honshu
 
> 8. The name of this Chinese city literally translates as "South
> Capital".
 
Nanjing
 
> 9. The name of the 6th-largest country in the world derives from
> the Latin for "Southern land." The name was first used
> officially in 1817.
 
Australia

> 10. This African country is the newest member of the United Nations,
> having gained admission in July 2011.
 
South Sudan

> * Game 2, Round 3 - Sports - Sports in the Roaring Twenties
 
> 1. In 1924, which city hosted the Olympics for the second time?
 
Paris
 
> 2. Thoroughbred racehorse Man o'War won 20 out of 21 races he was
> entered in. His last victory, in October 1920, was at Kenilworth
> Park -- in which Ontario city?
 
Hamilton; Ottawa

> 3. On the basis of his football achievements at the University of
> Illinois, "Time" magazine put Red Grange on its cover in October
> 1925. Next month Grange turned pro, signing with which NFL team?
 
Chicago Bears
 
> 4. Frenchwoman Suzanne Lenglen was the first female superstar in
> her sport, famous for her attire as well as her technique.
> What sport?
 
tennis

> 5. In 1926, swimmer Gertrude Ederle ["ED-er-lee"] did *what* in
> 14 hours 34 minutes, faster than any of the men who preceded her?
 
swam the English Channel
 
> in Detroit and another two in Philadelphia, before retiring as
> the holder of 43 major league regular season career records."
> Who is the Baseball Hall of Fame describing here?
 
Ty Cobb

> 8. What was "the house that Ruth built"?
 
Yankee Stadium
 
> and British Open Championships in the same year, 1926. After
> retirement in 1930, he co-founded the Masters Tournament.
> Name him.
 
Bobby Jones

> 10. In the years 1920 to '29 inclusive, which team won the Stanley
> Cup 4 times, more often than any other team? Hint: the answer
> is also the name of a current NHL team.
 
Montreal Canadiens; Toronto Maple Leafs
 
--
Joshua Kreitzer
gromit82@hotmail.com
Pete <pagrsg@wowway.com>: Dec 08 05:50AM

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote in news:f-mdnXKg-u_RQtXFnZ2dnUU7-
> of several villages including Sharon and Holland Landing.
 
> 2. An Indiana city on the St. Joseph River. In 1852, Henry
> Studebaker set up his first wagon shop here.
 
South Bend
 
 
> 3. This country was born in 1918. The name it later adopted --
> which was officially retired in 2003 -- identified it as the
> home of the southern Slavs.
 
South Slavonia
 
 
> 4. This former province achieved nationhood as Bangladesh in 1971.
 
East Pakistan
 
 
> 5. This northwest German region includes the cities of Munster
> and Dortmund. The treaty ending the 30 Years' War was signed
> here.
 
Westphalia
 
> Monte-Carlo-style "Formula E" electric-car races.
 
> 7. One of the main Japanese islands; its name means "North Ocean
> Road".
 
Okinawa; Hokkaido
 
 
> 8. The name of this Chinese city literally translates as "South
> Capital".
 
Guangzhou
 
 
> 9. The name of the 6th-largest country in the world derives from
> the Latin for "Southern land." The name was first used
> officially in 1817.
 
Algeria; Argentina
 
 
> 10. This African country is the newest member of the United Nations,
> having gained admission in July 2011.
 
South Sudan
 
 
> * Game 2, Round 3 - Sports - Sports in the Roaring Twenties
 
> 1. In 1924, which city hosted the Olympics for the second time?
 
Paris
 
 
> 2. Thoroughbred racehorse Man o'War won 20 out of 21 races he was
> entered in. His last victory, in October 1920, was at Kenilworth
> Park -- in which Ontario city?
 
Hamilton; London
 
 
> 3. On the basis of his football achievements at the University of
> Illinois, "Time" magazine put Red Grange on its cover in October
> 1925. Next month Grange turned pro, signing with which NFL team?
 
Chicago Bears
 
 
> 4. Frenchwoman Suzanne Lenglen was the first female superstar in
> her sport, famous for her attire as well as her technique.
> What sport?
 
Figure Skating
 
 
> 5. In 1926, swimmer Gertrude Ederle ["ED-er-lee"] did *what* in
> 14 hours 34 minutes, faster than any of the men who preceded her?
 
Swam the English Channel
 
> in Detroit and another two in Philadelphia, before retiring as
> the holder of 43 major league regular season career records."
> Who is the Baseball Hall of Fame describing here?
 
Ty Cobb
 
 
> 8. What was "the house that Ruth built"?
 
Yankee Stadium
 
> and British Open Championships in the same year, 1926. After
> retirement in 1930, he co-founded the Masters Tournament.
> Name him.
 
Bobby Jones
 
 
> 10. In the years 1920 to '29 inclusive, which team won the Stanley
> Cup 4 times, more often than any other team? Hint: the answer
> is also the name of a current NHL team.
 
Ottawa Senators
 
 
Pete Gayde
Dan Tilque <dtilque@frontier.com>: Dec 08 12:00AM -0800

Mark Brader wrote:
> the word "north", "south", "east", or "west" -- *in some language*.
 
> 1. This Ontario town was incorporated in 1971 with the amalgamation
> of several villages including Sharon and Holland Landing.
 
North York
 
 
> 2. An Indiana city on the St. Joseph River. In 1852, Henry
> Studebaker set up his first wagon shop here.
 
South Bend
 
 
> 3. This country was born in 1918. The name it later adopted --
> which was officially retired in 2003 -- identified it as the
> home of the southern Slavs.
 
Yugoslavia
 
 
> 4. This former province achieved nationhood as Bangladesh in 1971.
 
East Pakistan
 
 
> 5. This northwest German region includes the cities of Munster
> and Dortmund. The treaty ending the 30 Years' War was signed
> here.
 
Westphalia
 
> Monte-Carlo-style "Formula E" electric-car races.
 
> 7. One of the main Japanese islands; its name means "North Ocean
> Road".
 
Hokkaido ??
 
 
> 8. The name of this Chinese city literally translates as "South
> Capital".
 
Nanjing
 
 
> 9. The name of the 6th-largest country in the world derives from
> the Latin for "Southern land." The name was first used
> officially in 1817.
 
Australia
 
 
> 10. This African country is the newest member of the United Nations,
> having gained admission in July 2011.
 
South Sudan
 
 
> * Game 2, Round 3 - Sports - Sports in the Roaring Twenties
 
> 1. In 1924, which city hosted the Olympics for the second time?
 
Paris
 
 
> 2. Thoroughbred racehorse Man o'War won 20 out of 21 races he was
> entered in. His last victory, in October 1920, was at Kenilworth
> Park -- in which Ontario city?
 
London ??
 
 
> 3. On the basis of his football achievements at the University of
> Illinois, "Time" magazine put Red Grange on its cover in October
> 1925. Next month Grange turned pro, signing with which NFL team?
 
Chicago Bears
 
 
> 4. Frenchwoman Suzanne Lenglen was the first female superstar in
> her sport, famous for her attire as well as her technique.
> What sport?
 
gymnastics
 
 
> 5. In 1926, swimmer Gertrude Ederle ["ED-er-lee"] did *what* in
> 14 hours 34 minutes, faster than any of the men who preceded her?
 
swam the English channel
 
> in Detroit and another two in Philadelphia, before retiring as
> the holder of 43 major league regular season career records."
> Who is the Baseball Hall of Fame describing here?
 
Ted Williams
 
 
> 8. What was "the house that Ruth built"?
 
Yankee Stadium
 
> and British Open Championships in the same year, 1926. After
> retirement in 1930, he co-founded the Masters Tournament.
> Name him.
 
Sam Snead
 
 
--
Dan Tilque
Marc Dashevsky <usenet@MarcDashevsky.com>: Dec 08 02:23AM -0600

In article <f-mdnXKg-u_RQtXFnZ2dnUU7-d3NnZ2d@giganews.com>, msb@vex.net says...
> of several villages including Sharon and Holland Landing.
 
> 2. An Indiana city on the St. Joseph River. In 1852, Henry
> Studebaker set up his first wagon shop here.
South Bend
 
> 3. This country was born in 1918. The name it later adopted --
> which was officially retired in 2003 -- identified it as the
> home of the southern Slavs.
Yugoslavia
 
> 4. This former province achieved nationhood as Bangladesh in 1971.
East Pakistan
 
> Monte-Carlo-style "Formula E" electric-car races.
 
> 7. One of the main Japanese islands; its name means "North Ocean
> Road".
Hokkaido, Honshu
 
> 8. The name of this Chinese city literally translates as "South
> Capital".
Beijing
 
> 9. The name of the 6th-largest country in the world derives from
> the Latin for "Southern land." The name was first used
> officially in 1817.
Australia
 
 
> 3. On the basis of his football achievements at the University of
> Illinois, "Time" magazine put Red Grange on its cover in October
> 1925. Next month Grange turned pro, signing with which NFL team?
Chicago Bears
 
> What sport?
 
> 5. In 1926, swimmer Gertrude Ederle ["ED-er-lee"] did *what* in
> 14 hours 34 minutes, faster than any of the men who preceded her?
swam the English Channel
 
> in Detroit and another two in Philadelphia, before retiring as
> the holder of 43 major league regular season career records."
> Who is the Baseball Hall of Fame describing here?
Ty Cobb
 
> 8. What was "the house that Ruth built"?
Yankee Stadium
 
> and British Open Championships in the same year, 1926. After
> retirement in 1930, he co-founded the Masters Tournament.
> Name him.
Bobby Jones
 
> 10. In the years 1920 to '29 inclusive, which team won the Stanley
> Cup 4 times, more often than any other team? Hint: the answer
> is also the name of a current NHL team.
Ottawa Senators
 
 
--
Replace "usenet" with "marc" in the e-mail address.
Joshua Kreitzer <gromit82@hotmail.com>: Dec 08 04:53AM

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote in news:ibadne69EIsYktzFnZ2dnUU7-
>> also famous for "Hawaii 5-0".
 
> Lalo Schifrin. 4 for Joshua, Dan Blum, Stephen, and Pete. 3 for Marc
> and Gareth.
 
As far as I can find, the theme from "Hawaii Five-O" was written by Morton
Stevens. I haven't found anything about Lalo Schifrin writing music for
that show.
 
--
Joshua Kreitzer
gromit82@hotmail.com
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Dec 08 12:00AM -0600

Mark Brader:
>>> also famous for "Hawaii 5-0".
 
>> Lalo Schifrin. 4 for Joshua, Dan Blum, Stephen, and Pete. 3 for Marc
>> and Gareth.
 
Joshua Kreitzer:
> As far as I can find, the theme from "Hawaii Five-O" was written by Morton
> Stevens. I haven't found anything about Lalo Schifrin writing music for
> that show.
 
I do find one web site that supports the claim:
 
http://www.episodeworld.com/show/Hawaii_Five-O
 
but, still, it seems clear enough that it's wrong. Sorry about that, Chief.
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "You often seem quite gracious, in your way."
msb@vex.net | --Steve Summit
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Dec 07 10:17PM -0600

Mark Brader:
 
> ** Game 1, Round 9 - Geography - Non-Self-Governing Territories
 
> In each case, identify the present or former non-self-governing
> territory that we describe.
 
I note in passing that answers given on various questions on this
round included Comoros, Grenada, Mauritania, Mauritius, Nauru,
and St. Kitts & Nevis, all of which are independent countries.
 
> territory sits in the South Pacific 2,600 miles (4,200 km)
> southwest of Hawaii and 2,500 miles northeast of Australia.
> The main airport is located in Pago Pago.
 
American Samoa. 4 for Dan Blum, Dan Tilque, Marc, Joshua, and Calvin.
 
> 2. A British overseas territory located in the Caribbean east
> of Puerto Rico and north of St. Martin. Only the main island
> is populated; the capital is The Valley.
 
Anguilla. 4 for Joshua and Peter.
 
> a British Overseas Territory. It has seen a loss of more than
> half its permanent population due to the eruption and continuing
> activity of the Soufriere volcano.
 
Montserrat. 4 for Dan Blum, Dan Tilque, Peter, Erland, and Pete.
 
> this British Overseas Territory is popular with tourists and
> those looking for an offshore financial haven. The bulk of
> the population live on the island of Providenciales.
 
Turks and Caicos. 4 for Joshua and Pete.
 
> coral atolls, Atafu, Nukononu, and Fakaofo. It is still
> sometimes referred to by its older colonial name, the Union
> Islands.
 
Tokelau. 4 for Joshua.
 
> control over parts of it). One of the most sparsely populated
> regions of the world, with an estimated 500,000 people spread
> over 103,000 sq.mi. (267,000 km²).
 
Western Sahara. 4 for Dan Blum, Dan Tilque, Joshua, Peter, Erland,
and Pete.
 
> Tristan de Cunha. The British used it over the centuries as
> a prison colony; during the second Boer War, 5,000 Boers taken
> prisoner were held here.
 
St. Helena. 4 for Dan Blum, Dan Tilque, Joshua, Peter, Erland,
and Calvin.
 
> decolonized. Located in the Indian Ocean east of Madagascar,
> it has been inhabited since the 17th century and is the outermost
> component of the Eurozone.
 
Réunion. 4 for Dan Blum, Dan Tilque, Joshua, Peter, and Erland.
 
> A haven, starting in the 17th century, for pirates, shipwrecked
> sailors, and reportedly deserters from the New Model Army, this
> territory is now one of the world's chief overseas tax havens.
 
Cayman Islands. 4 for Dan Blum, Dan Tilque, Marc, Joshua, Peter,
and Pete. 3 for Calvin.
 
> 10. Formerly a non-self-governing territory, now a special
> administrative unit of China, this gambling hub was occupied
> by Portugal for over 300 years.
 
Macau. 4 for everyone -- Dan Blum, Dan Tilque, Marc, Joshua, Peter,
Erland, Pete, Calvin, and Jason.
 
 
> ** Game 1, Round 10 - Olympic Challenge Round
 
> All questions deal with the summer Olympic Games.
 
This was the hardest round in the original game.
 
 
> * A. Canadian Gold
 
> A1. In which event did Penny Oleksiak win gold?
 
100 m freestyle (swimming). (In 2016. Accepting 100 m crawl.)
 
> A2. Name the first athlete in an individual sport to win gold
> for Canada in two successive summer Olympics.
 
Rosie MacLennan. (Trampoline, 2012 and 2016.)
 
 
 
> Name the novies.
 
> B1. Mariel Hemingway stars in this 1982 film about a sprinter
> striving to qualify for the 1980 Olympic Games.
 
"Personal Best". 4 for Dan Blum, Marc, Joshua, and Jason.
 
> B2. Susan Anton stars in this 1979 science-fiction film
> about a neo-Nazi doctor who turns his daughter into an
> über-athlete.
 
"Goldengirl". 4 for Joshua.
 
 
 
> These questions refer to the principal city hosting each games.
 
> C1. What was the southernmost host city of the summer Olympic
> Games?
 
Melbourne (1956). 4 for Dan Tilque, Marc, Joshua, Peter, Erland,
Pete, and Calvin.
 
Followed, in order, by: Sydney, Rio de Janeiro, Mexico City, Atlanta.
If the question had been about the winter Olympics, the answer would
have been Nagano, which is farther north than any of the above.
 
> C2. What was the northernmost host city of the summer Olympic
> Games?
 
Helsinki (1952). 4 for Dan Tilque, Joshua, Peter, Erland, Pete,
and Calvin.
 
Followed, in order, by: Stockholm, Moscow, Berlin, Amsterdam.
If the question had included the Winter Olympics, the answer would
have been Lillehammer, and Oslo would be #3 on the list, between
Helsinki and Stockholm.
 
 
> * D. Historic Olympics
 
> D1. The 1916 Olympics were canceled due to the First World War.
> Which city was to have hosted them?
 
Berlin. 4 for Dan Tilque, Erland, Pete, and Calvin.
 
Berlin eventually got its Olympics in 1936.
 
> D2. The 1940 summer Olympics were canceled twice due to the
> Second World War. Which city was originally to have
> hosted them?
 
Tokyo. (Then Helsinki.) 4 for Joshua and Peter. 2 for Pete.
 
The 1940 Winter Olympics would have been in Sapporo, and the 1944
Olympics would have been in Cortina d'Ampezzo and London. The
games were eventually held in all five cities, respectively in
1964, 1952, 1972, 1956, and 1948 (and again in 2012).
 
 
> * E. Olympic Track Records
 
> E1. What is Usain Bolt's Olympic record time for the 100 m run,
> set in 2012? Exact answer required.
 
9.63 s.
 
> E2. Name the runner whose record of 10.62 s for the women's
> 100 m has stood since 1988.
 
Florence Griffith-Joyner. 4 for Peter and Calvin. 2 for Dan Blum.
 
 
> * F. Olympic Fails
 
> F1. Name the 12-time Olympic medal-winning American swimmer
> who claimed falsely to have been held up at gunpoint in Rio.
 
Ryan Lochte. 4 for Dan Blum, Joshua, Peter, Erland, Pete, and Calvin.
3 for Jason.
 
> hot water with 1,400,000,000 people: "The little 14-year-old
> from China dropped the ball, baby. Too excited. Went out
> like stink. Died like..."
 
"A pig"! (The athlete was swimmer Ai Yanhan.)
 
 
Scores, if there are no errors:
 
GAME 1 ROUNDS-> 2 3 4 4 6 7 8 9 10 BEST
TOPICS-> Ent Can His Aud Spo Sci Art Geo Cha SEVEN
Joshua Kreitzer 40 7 28 36 24 20 18 36 24 208
Pete Gayde 24 4 12 32 36 28 18 20 18 176
Marc Dashevsky 32 0 28 27 24 40 8 12 8 171
Dan Blum 32 0 24 16 12 32 11 28 10 155
Peter Smyth -- -- 18 4 28 32 0 28 20 130
Dan Tilque 12 0 12 0 20 32 4 28 12 120
"Calvin" 12 0 22 8 16 20 10 15 20 115
Stephen Perry -- -- 35 40 36 -- -- -- -- 111
Gareth Owen 32 0 20 19 35 -- -- -- -- 106
Bruce Bowler -- -- 16 16 36 -- -- -- -- 68
Erland Sommarskog -- -- 16 0 4 12 0 20 16 68
Björn Lundin 0 0 10 0 0 11 4 -- -- 25
Don Piven -- -- 0 0 24 -- -- -- -- 24
Jason Kreitzer -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 4 7 11
 
--
Mark Brader "...out of the dark coffee-stained mugs of
Toronto insane programmers throughout the world..."
msb@vex.net -- Liam Quin
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Dec 07 10:21PM -0600

Oops, I forgot to note that Game 1 of this season is over, and
congratulate the winner, JOSHUA KREITZER. So -- slightly belated
congratulations, sir! For more detail, see the standings included
in the previous posting.
 
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "Alas, there is NO SUCH THING as 'NO SUCH THING as
msb@vex.net | privileged access.'" -- Alan Silverstein
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