Saturday, August 19, 2017

Digest for rec.games.trivia@googlegroups.com - 6 updates in 2 topics

Erland Sommarskog <esquel@sommarskog.se>: Aug 18 08:14PM +0200

> * Game 10, Round 7 - Literature - Recent Biographies of Famous Women
 
> 2. "Reckless: My Life as a Pretender".
 
Chrissie Hyde
 
> British colonies Tanganyika and Zanzibar merged to become
> Tanzania. The new union's first president held that office
> until 1985. Give his name.
 
Nyere

> and Central Africa from about 1000 BC to 500 AD, until they
> could be found in just about every part of the continent south
> of the Sahara. What are these people collectively called?
 
Swahili

> these once-widespread hunter-gatherer people whose ancestors
> are thought to be the original human inhabitants of the region.
> What is the collective name of *these* people?
 
Hottentots

> boasted superpower status among the Roman Empire and the great
> civilizations found in Persia, China, and India. Name the
> modern African nation that served as Aksum's center and base.
 
Mali

> of Gao was the empire's capital, but it was another Songhai city
> that became famous for its repositories of ancient manuscripts
> and intellectual brilliance. What is *that* city's name?
 
Timbuktu


> Mbasogo is also the longest-serving non-royal leader in the
> world. Name *either* of the countries they lead (or led,
> if the facts have changed since the original game).

Angola (Dos Santos)
 
 
--
Erland Sommarskog, Stockholm, esquel@sommarskog.se
Gareth Owen <gwowen@gmail.com>: Aug 18 07:34PM +0100


> 1. "The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo".
 
Amy Schumer
 
> 4. "Bossypants".
 
Tina Fey
 
> 7. "Scrappy Little Nobody", by an American actress and singer who
> has a supporting role in The Twilight Saga.
 
Zooey Deschanel
 
> 8. "Just Kids", written by a legend of the New York punk scene.
 
Patti Smith!!
 
> now in its fifth season.
 
> 10. "Yes, Please", written by a former "Saturday Night Live"
> actress and comedienne.
 
Amy Poehler?
 
> born in 1787 and was assassinated in 1828. In later years,
> even the British and Afrikaners had to admit admiration for
> his prowess in war. Who was he?
 
Shaka
 
> boasted superpower status among the Roman Empire and the great
> civilizations found in Persia, China, and India. Name the
> modern African nation that served as Aksum's center and base.
 
Mali
Pete Gayde <pagrsg@wowway.com>: Aug 18 10:10PM

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote in news:bpadnRDhZKW9_gvEnZ2dnUU7-
> in the past couple of years. We give you the title (and in some
> cases a short clue); you name the person who's the subject.
 
> 1. "The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo".
 
Amy Schumer
 
 
> 2. "Reckless: My Life as a Pretender".
 
> 3. "Talking as Fast as I Can".
 
> 4. "Bossypants".
 
Tina Fey
 
 
> 5. "The Princess Diarist".
 
Hathaway
 
 
> 7. "Scrappy Little Nobody", by an American actress and singer who
> has a supporting role in The Twilight Saga.
 
> 8. "Just Kids", written by a legend of the New York punk scene.
 
Patti Smith
 
> and Central Africa from about 1000 BC to 500 AD, until they
> could be found in just about every part of the continent south
> of the Sahara. What are these people collectively called?
 
Swahili
 
> these once-widespread hunter-gatherer people whose ancestors
> are thought to be the original human inhabitants of the region.
> What is the collective name of *these* people?
 
Swahili
 
> boasted superpower status among the Roman Empire and the great
> civilizations found in Persia, China, and India. Name the
> modern African nation that served as Aksum's center and base.
 
Ethiopia; Sudan
 
> of Gao was the empire's capital, but it was another Songhai city
> that became famous for its repositories of ancient manuscripts
> and intellectual brilliance. What is *that* city's name?
 
Timbuktu
 
> and grandiose megalomania. In Malawi this man ruled with an
> iron fist for 30 years, from the country's independence from
> Britain in 1964 to 1994. Who is he?
 
Kenyatta
 
> Mbasogo is also the longest-serving non-royal leader in the
> world. Name *either* of the countries they lead (or led,
> if the facts have changed since the original game).
 
Madagascar; Cameroon
 
 
Pete Gayde
"Peter Smyth" <smythp@gmail.com>: Aug 18 11:23AM

Calvin wrote:
 
 
> 1 Which hit song of 1965 includes the following lines: You're trying
> hard not to show it / But baby, baby I know it?
You've Lost That Loving Feeling
> 2 'The Moon's A Balloon' (1971) was the best-selling memoir of which
> British actor?
Laurence Olivier
> 3 What 2-word term is both a leading female singer in an Opera, and
> someone who is temperamental and hard to please?
Diva seems to fit the clues, but not sure what the second word would be?
> 4 Which bird is the national symbol of France?
 
> 5 What nationality was the writer and artist Christy Brown, best known
> for his 1954 autobiography "My Left Foot"?
Irish
> 6 In humans, what term refers to the two lower chambers of the heart?
Ventricles
> 7 What's the capital city of Mali?
Timbuktu
> 8 A Taikonaut is which country's equivalent of an astronaut?   
China
> 9 Which two singers duetted on the 1981 hit "Endless Love"?
 
> 10 Russia shares land borders with some 14 countries. Which is the
> shortest, barely 20km in length?
North Korea
 
Peter Smyth
Pete Gayde <pagrsg@wowway.com>: Aug 18 06:18PM

Calvin <334152@gmail.com> wrote in
 
> 1 Which hit song of 1965 includes the following lines: You're
> trying hard not to show it / But baby, baby I know it?
 
You've Lost that Loving Feeling
 
> 2 'The
> Moon's A Balloon' (1971) was the best-selling memoir of which
> British actor?
 
Peter Sellers
 
> 3 What 2-word term is both a leading female singer
> in an Opera, and someone who is temperamental and hard to please?
 
Prima donna
 
> 4 Which bird is the national symbol of France?
 
Rooster
 
> 5 What nationality
> was the writer and artist Christy Brown, best known for his 1954
> autobiography "My Left Foot"?
 
Irish
 
> 6 In humans, what term refers to the
> two lower chambers of the heart?
 
Ventricle
 
> 7 What's the capital city of Mali?
 
Bamako
 
> 8 A Taikonaut is which country's equivalent of an
> astronaut?   
 
Japan
 
> 9 Which two singers duetted on the 1981 hit "Endless Love"?
> 10 Russia shares land borders with some 14
> countries. Which is the shortest, barely 20km in length?
 
Poland
 
 
> cheers,
> calvin
 
Pete Gayde
Gareth Owen <gwowen@gmail.com>: Aug 18 07:30PM +0100


> 1 Which hit song of 1965 includes the following lines: You're trying
> hard not to show it / But baby, baby I know it?
 
You've Lost That Living Feeling
 
> 2 'The Moon's A Balloon' (1971) was the best-selling memoir of which
> British actor?
 
David Niven
 
> 3 What 2-word term is both a leading female singer in an Opera, and
> someone who is temperamental and hard to please?
 
Prima Donna
 
> 4 Which bird is the national symbol of France?
 
Cock
 
> 5 What nationality was the writer and artist Christy Brown, best known
> for his 1954 autobiography "My Left Foot"?
 
Irish
 
> 6 In humans, what term refers to the two lower chambers of the heart?
 
(tosses coin) Ventricle
 
> 7 What's the capital city of Mali?
 
Baku?
 
> 8 A Taikonaut is which country's equivalent of an astronaut?   
 
China
 
> 9 Which two singers duetted on the 1981 hit "Endless Love"?
 
Diana Ross & Lionel Richie
 
> 10 Russia shares land borders with some 14 countries. Which is the
> shortest, barely 20km in length?
 
Finland??
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Friday, August 18, 2017

Digest for rec.games.trivia@googlegroups.com - 21 updates in 6 topics

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Aug 17 10:46PM -0500

You get until I come back for this one.
 
These questions were written to be asked in Toronto on 2017-03-27,
and should be interpreted accordingly.
 
On each question you may give up to two answers, but if you give
both a right answer and a wrong answer, there is a small penalty.
Please post all your answers to the newsgroup in a single followup,
based only on your own knowledge. (In your answer posting, quote
the questions and place your answer below each one.) I will reveal
the correct answers in about 10-12 days.
 
All questions were written by members of 5 Easy Pieces and are
used here by permission, but have been reformatted and may have
been retyped and/or edited by me. For further information see
my 2016-11-26 companion posting on "Questions from the Canadian
Inquisition (QFTCI*)".
 
 
* Game 10, Round 7 - Literature - Recent Biographies of Famous Women
 
Many celebrities have published biographies or autobiographies
in the past couple of years. We give you the title (and in some
cases a short clue); you name the person who's the subject.
 
1. "The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo".
 
2. "Reckless: My Life as a Pretender".
 
3. "Talking as Fast as I Can".
 
4. "Bossypants".
 
5. "The Princess Diarist".
 
6. "Not That Kind of Girl".
 
7. "Scrappy Little Nobody", by an American actress and singer who
has a supporting role in The Twilight Saga.
 
8. "Just Kids", written by a legend of the New York punk scene.
 
9. "Why Not Me?", by a comedienne and star of her own sitcom that's
now in its fifth season.
 
10. "Yes, Please", written by a former "Saturday Night Live"
actress and comedienne.
 
 
* Game 10, Round 8 - History - Africa
 
If we didn't already know about the importance of Africa to the
world down through the ages, the recent excellent PBS series
"Africa's Great Civilizations", hosted by Henry Louis Gates Jr.,
has certainly enlightened us. Here are 10 questions on some of
that history.
 
1. For years Rhodesia, the country now known as Zimbabwe, denied
that black Africans could possibly have had anything to do with
building this remarkable architectural wonder that is often
cited as the oldest human-made monumental structure south of
the Sahara -- according to white Rhodesians it had to have
been created by Portuguese or Arab traders, and before 1980
saying otherwise could have landed you in jail. Of course,
indigenous people did erect the thing. What is it called?
 
2. Through strength of will and martial ability, this Zulu leader
made his people paramount in what is now South Africa. He was
born in 1787 and was assassinated in 1828. In later years,
even the British and Afrikaners had to admit admiration for
his prowess in war. Who was he?
 
3. Independence from European colonial rule was in the air in
1950s and 1960s Africa. Among the many newly minted nations
back then was Senegal, which was granted freedom from France
in 1960. The country's first president was a distinguished poet
and intellectual and became the first African to be elected to
France's Académie Française. Who was he?
 
4. In 1964, a few years after their independence, neighboring former
British colonies Tanganyika and Zanzibar merged to become
Tanzania. The new union's first president held that office
until 1985. Give his name.
 
5. This large group of people whose hundreds of languages are
linguistically related spread southward and eastward from West
and Central Africa from about 1000 BC to 500 AD, until they
could be found in just about every part of the continent south
of the Sahara. What are these people collectively called?
 
6. When the <answer 5> peoples first reached what are now
Botswana, Namibia, Zimbabwe, and South Africa, they encountered
these once-widespread hunter-gatherer people whose ancestors
are thought to be the original human inhabitants of the region.
What is the collective name of *these* people?
 
7. Seven different empires once thrived in West and East Africa.
One of these was in East Africa and was called the Kingdom
of Aksum, which created a rich culture and fabulous trading
economy that lasted from about 100 to 940. At its height Aksum
boasted superpower status among the Roman Empire and the great
civilizations found in Persia, China, and India. Name the
modern African nation that served as Aksum's center and base.
 
8. In West Africa, the Songhai Empire flourished in the 15th
and 16th centuries. At its height it controlled 1,400,000 km²
(500,000 sq.mi.), including parts of the modern nations of Benin,
Burkina Faso, Mali, Nigeria, and Senegal, among others. The city
of Gao was the empire's capital, but it was another Songhai city
that became famous for its repositories of ancient manuscripts
and intellectual brilliance. What is *that* city's name?
 
9. Since gaining independence from European masters, many African
nations have been afflicted with murderous dictators and despots,
some of whom like Kwame Nkrumah in Ghana or Robert Mugabe in
Zimbabwe started off, it seemed, with the welfare of their
people at heart but soon set a course for personal enrichment
and grandiose megalomania. In Malawi this man ruled with an
iron fist for 30 years, from the country's independence from
Britain in 1964 to 1994. Who is he?
 
10. José Eduardo Dos Santos and Teodoro Obiang Nguema Mbasogo are
Africa's longest-serving leaders, both coming to power in 1979.
Mbasogo is also the longest-serving non-royal leader in the
world. Name *either* of the countries they lead (or led,
if the facts have changed since the original game).
 
--
Mark Brader "MSB is an accepted explanation for men's
Toronto misbehaviors. ... Just blame it on MSB
msb@vex.net and everyone nods their heads." -- "TJ"
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
tool@panix.com (Dan Blum): Aug 18 03:53AM


> * Game 10, Round 7 - Literature - Recent Biographies of Famous Women
 
> 1. "The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo".
 
Amy Schumer
 
> 2. "Reckless: My Life as a Pretender".
 
Chrissy Hynde
 
> 4. "Bossypants".
 
Tina Fey
 
> 5. "The Princess Diarist".
 
Carrie Fisher
 
> 6. "Not That Kind of Girl".
 
Laverne Cox
 
> 7. "Scrappy Little Nobody", by an American actress and singer who
> has a supporting role in The Twilight Saga.
 
Anna Kendrick
 
> 9. "Why Not Me?", by a comedienne and star of her own sitcom that's
> now in its fifth season.
 
Mindy Kaling
 
> 10. "Yes, Please", written by a former "Saturday Night Live"
> actress and comedienne.
 
Amy Poehler
 
> born in 1787 and was assassinated in 1828. In later years,
> even the British and Afrikaners had to admit admiration for
> his prowess in war. Who was he?
 
Shaka
(or Chaka or T'chaka, depending on which orthographic convention you prefer)
 
> and Central Africa from about 1000 BC to 500 AD, until they
> could be found in just about every part of the continent south
> of the Sahara. What are these people collectively called?
 
Bantu
 
> these once-widespread hunter-gatherer people whose ancestors
> are thought to be the original human inhabitants of the region.
> What is the collective name of *these* people?
 
Bushmen
 
> boasted superpower status among the Roman Empire and the great
> civilizations found in Persia, China, and India. Name the
> modern African nation that served as Aksum's center and base.
 
Ethiopia
 
> of Gao was the empire's capital, but it was another Songhai city
> that became famous for its repositories of ancient manuscripts
> and intellectual brilliance. What is *that* city's name?
 
Timbuktu
 
> Mbasogo is also the longest-serving non-royal leader in the
> world. Name *either* of the countries they lead (or led,
> if the facts have changed since the original game).
 
Mozambique; Equatorial Guinea
 
--
_______________________________________________________________________
Dan Blum tool@panix.com
"I wouldn't have believed it myself if I hadn't just made it up."
Joshua Kreitzer <gromit82@hotmail.com>: Aug 18 05:04AM

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote in news:bpadnRDhZKW9_gvEnZ2dnUU7-
> in the past couple of years. We give you the title (and in some
> cases a short clue); you name the person who's the subject.
 
> 1. "The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo".
 
Amy Schumer

> 4. "Bossypants".
 
Tina Fey
 
> 5. "The Princess Diarist".
 
Carrie Fisher

> 6. "Not That Kind of Girl".
 
Lena Dunham
 
> 8. "Just Kids", written by a legend of the New York punk scene.
 
Patti Smith

> 9. "Why Not Me?", by a comedienne and star of her own sitcom that's
> now in its fifth season.
 
Mindy Kaling
 
> 10. "Yes, Please", written by a former "Saturday Night Live"
> actress and comedienne.
 
Amy Poehler

> born in 1787 and was assassinated in 1828. In later years,
> even the British and Afrikaners had to admit admiration for
> his prowess in war. Who was he?
 
Shaka

> in 1960. The country's first president was a distinguished poet
> and intellectual and became the first African to be elected to
> France's Académie Française. Who was he?
 
Senghor
 
> and Central Africa from about 1000 BC to 500 AD, until they
> could be found in just about every part of the continent south
> of the Sahara. What are these people collectively called?
 
Bantu

> these once-widespread hunter-gatherer people whose ancestors
> are thought to be the original human inhabitants of the region.
> What is the collective name of *these* people?
 
Khoi-San
 
> boasted superpower status among the Roman Empire and the great
> civilizations found in Persia, China, and India. Name the
> modern African nation that served as Aksum's center and base.
 
Kenya

> of Gao was the empire's capital, but it was another Songhai city
> that became famous for its repositories of ancient manuscripts
> and intellectual brilliance. What is *that* city's name?
 
Timbuktu

> Mbasogo is also the longest-serving non-royal leader in the
> world. Name *either* of the countries they lead (or led,
> if the facts have changed since the original game).
 
Equatorial Guinea
 
--
Joshua Kreitzer
gromit82@hotmail.com
Dan Tilque <dtilque@frontier.com>: Aug 18 12:06AM -0700

Mark Brader wrote:
> now in its fifth season.
 
> 10. "Yes, Please", written by a former "Saturday Night Live"
> actress and comedienne.
 
Jane Curtin
 
> been created by Portuguese or Arab traders, and before 1980
> saying otherwise could have landed you in jail. Of course,
> indigenous people did erect the thing. What is it called?
 
Great Zimbabwe
 
> born in 1787 and was assassinated in 1828. In later years,
> even the British and Afrikaners had to admit admiration for
> his prowess in war. Who was he?
 
Shaka
 
> and Central Africa from about 1000 BC to 500 AD, until they
> could be found in just about every part of the continent south
> of the Sahara. What are these people collectively called?
 
Bantu
 
> these once-widespread hunter-gatherer people whose ancestors
> are thought to be the original human inhabitants of the region.
> What is the collective name of *these* people?
 
San
 
> of Gao was the empire's capital, but it was another Songhai city
> that became famous for its repositories of ancient manuscripts
> and intellectual brilliance. What is *that* city's name?
 
Timbuktu
 
> Mbasogo is also the longest-serving non-royal leader in the
> world. Name *either* of the countries they lead (or led,
> if the facts have changed since the original game).
 
Equatorial Guinea
 
 
--
Dan Tilque
Marc Dashevsky <usenet@MarcDashevsky.com>: Aug 18 03:01AM -0500

In article <bpadnRDhZKW9_gvEnZ2dnUU7-QnNnZ2d@giganews.com>, msb@vex.net says...
> cases a short clue); you name the person who's the subject.
 
> 1. "The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo".
 
> 2. "Reckless: My Life as a Pretender".
Chrissie Hynde
 
> 3. "Talking as Fast as I Can".
 
> 4. "Bossypants".
 
> 5. "The Princess Diarist".
Carrie Fisher
 
 
> 7. "Scrappy Little Nobody", by an American actress and singer who
> has a supporting role in The Twilight Saga.
 
> 8. "Just Kids", written by a legend of the New York punk scene.
Patti Smith
 
> born in 1787 and was assassinated in 1828. In later years,
> even the British and Afrikaners had to admit admiration for
> his prowess in war. Who was he?
Shaka Zulu
 
 
 
 
--
Replace "usenet" with "marc" in the e-mail address.
Calvin <334152@gmail.com>: Aug 17 05:19PM -0700

1 Which hit song of 1965 includes the following lines: You're trying hard not to show it / But baby, baby I know it?
2 'The Moon's A Balloon' (1971) was the best-selling memoir of which British actor?
3 What 2-word term is both a leading female singer in an Opera, and someone who is temperamental and hard to please?
4 Which bird is the national symbol of France?
5 What nationality was the writer and artist Christy Brown, best known for his 1954 autobiography "My Left Foot"?
6 In humans, what term refers to the two lower chambers of the heart?
7 What's the capital city of Mali?
8 A Taikonaut is which country's equivalent of an astronaut?   
9 Which two singers duetted on the 1981 hit "Endless Love"?
10 Russia shares land borders with some 14 countries. Which is the shortest, barely 20km in length?
 
cheers,
calvin
tool@panix.com (Dan Blum): Aug 18 12:42AM


> 2 ?The Moon's A Balloon? (1971) was the best-selling memoir of which British actor?
 
Peter Sellers
 
> 3 What 2-word term is both a leading female singer in an Opera, and someone who is temperamental and hard to please?
 
prima donna
 
> 4 Which bird is the national symbol of France?
 
eagle
 
> 5 What nationality was the writer and artist Christy Brown, best known for his 1954 autobiography "My Left Foot"?
 
Irish
 
> 6 In humans, what term refers to the two lower chambers of the heart?
 
ventral
 
> 7 What's the capital city of Mali?
 
Bamako
 
> 8 A Taikonaut is which country?s equivalent of an astronaut? ??
 
China
 
> 10 Russia shares land borders with some 14 countries. Which is the shortest, barely 20km in length?
 
Azerbaijan
 
--
_______________________________________________________________________
Dan Blum tool@panix.com
"I wouldn't have believed it myself if I hadn't just made it up."
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Aug 17 10:13PM -0500

Calvin:
> 1 Which hit song of 1965 includes the following lines: You're
> trying hard not to show it / But baby, baby I know it?
 
"We've Lost That Loving Feeling".
 
> 2 'The Moon's A Balloon' (1971) was the best-selling
> memoir of which British actor?
 
Niven.
 
> 3 What 2-word term is both a leading female singer in an
> Opera, and someone who is temperamental and hard to please?
 
Diva.
 
> 4 Which bird is the national symbol of France?
 
Brigitte Bardot. :-)
 
Gung wbxr znl erdhver na rkcynangvba orfvqrf gur boivbhf qbhoyr zrnavat
bs "oveq". Nabgure angvbany flzoby bs Senapr vf na vqrnyvmrq jbzna
anzrq, V guvax, Znevnaar, jubfr vzntr vf be unf orra hfrq va gur fnzr
fbeg bs jnl gung gur HF hfrq gb chg vzntrf bs "Yvoregl" nf n jbzna ba
pbvaf naq fhpu orsber gurl fjvgpurq gb hfvat erny crbcyr. Ohg gur
vzntrf bs Znevnaar bire gvzr unir orra onfrq ba qvssrerag erny jbzra,
naq, vs V erzrzore pbeerpgyl, Oneqbg jnf bar bs gurz.
 
> 5 What nationality was the writer and artist Christy Brown,
> best known for his 1954 autobiography "My Left Foot"?
 
Irish.
 
> 6 In humans, what term refers to the two lower chambers of the heart?
 
Ventricles.
 
> 7 What's the capital city of Mali?
 
Bamako.
 
> 8 A Taikonaut is which country's equivalent of an astronaut?
 
Malian. :-) Actually Chinese.
 
> 9 Which two singers duetted on the 1981 hit "Endless Love"?
 
Johnson and Johnson. :-)
 
> 10 Russia shares land borders with some 14 countries. Which is
> the shortest, barely 20km in length?
 
Pakistan?
--
Mark Brader | "[These] articles should be self-explanatory.
Toronto | If they *don't* explain themselves,
msb@vex.net | you'll have to read them." -- Michael Wares
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Aug 17 10:13PM -0500

Dan Blum:
> prima donna
 
Hmm. I think my answer and Dan's may both be right.
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | I am a mathematician, sir. I never permit myself
msb@vex.net | to think. --Stuart Mills (Carr: The Three Coffins)
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Aug 17 10:16PM -0500

Mark Brader:
> Hmm. I think my answer and Dan's may both be right.
 
Or maybe I just have trouble counting to 2. :-(
 
I think I was predisposed to my answer because it was also an answer on
a 1982-ish rerun of "The New $25,000 Pyramid" that I watched earlier today.
--
Mark Brader, Toronto "More importantly, Mark is just plain wrong."
msb@vex.net -- John Hollingsworth
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
Dan Tilque <dtilque@frontier.com>: Aug 17 11:55PM -0700

Calvin wrote:
> 1 Which hit song of 1965 includes the following lines: You're trying hard not to show it / But baby, baby I know it?
 
You've Lost That Lovin' Feelin' by the Righteous Brothers
 
> 2 'The Moon's A Balloon' (1971) was the best-selling memoir of which British actor?
> 3 What 2-word term is both a leading female singer in an Opera, and someone who is temperamental and hard to please?
 
prima donna
 
> 4 Which bird is the national symbol of France?
> 5 What nationality was the writer and artist Christy Brown, best known for his 1954 autobiography "My Left Foot"?
 
American
 
> 6 In humans, what term refers to the two lower chambers of the heart?
 
ventricle
 
> 7 What's the capital city of Mali?
> 8 A Taikonaut is which country's equivalent of an astronaut?
 
China
 
> 9 Which two singers duetted on the 1981 hit "Endless Love"?
> 10 Russia shares land borders with some 14 countries. Which is the shortest, barely 20km in length?
 
North Korea
 
--
Dan Tilque
Erland Sommarskog <esquel@sommarskog.se>: Aug 18 07:14AM

> 1 Which hit song of 1965 includes the following lines: You're
> trying hard not to show it / But baby, baby I know it?
 
You've Lost that Loving Feeling
 
> 3 What 2-word term is both a leading female singer in an Opera, and
> someone who is temperamental and hard to please?
 
Prima donna
 
> 4 Which bird is the national symbol of France?
 
I would say Marianne, but she is not exactly a bird.
 
> 5 What nationality was the writer and artist Christy Brown, best
> known for his 1954 autobiography "My Left Foot"?
 
New Zealand
 
> 7 What's the capital city of Mali?
 
Bamako
 
> 8 A Taikonaut is which country's equivalent of an astronaut?   
 
China
 
> 10 Russia shares land borders with some 14 countries. Which is the
> shortest, barely 20km in length?
 
North Korea
 
 
 
 
--
Erland Sommarskog, Stockholm, esquel@sommarskog.se
Erland Sommarskog <esquel@sommarskog.se>: Aug 18 07:19AM

> Mark Brader:
>> Hmm. I think my answer and Dan's may both be right.
 
> Or maybe I just have trouble counting to 2. :-(
 
I also had some problems getting the count right, since in Swedish we
write it as a single word. So I was sort of predisposed to think it would
be the same in English. But obviously not in Italian.
 
 
--
Erland Sommarskog, Stockholm, esquel@sommarskog.se
Marc Dashevsky <usenet@MarcDashevsky.com>: Aug 18 02:51AM -0500

In article <8b3045d4-d78d-4b4f-b075-a93847010e1e@googlegroups.com>, 334152@gmail.com says...
 
> 1 Which hit song of 1965 includes the following lines: You're trying hard not to show it / But baby, baby I know it?
You've Lost That Loving Feeling
 
> 2 ?The Moon's A Balloon? (1971) was the best-selling memoir of which British actor?
> 3 What 2-word term is both a leading female singer in an Opera, and someone who is temperamental and hard to please?
prima donna
 
> 4 Which bird is the national symbol of France?
> 5 What nationality was the writer and artist Christy Brown, best known for his 1954 autobiography "My Left Foot"?
Irish
 
> 6 In humans, what term refers to the two lower chambers of the heart?
ventricle
 
> 7 What's the capital city of Mali?
> 8 A Taikonaut is which country?s equivalent of an astronaut?   
Japan
 
 
--
Replace "usenet" with "marc" in the e-mail address.
tool@panix.com (Dan Blum): Aug 17 02:44PM


> 1 George Washington
 
1732
1802
 
> 2 Thomas Jefferson
 
1740
1826
 
> 3 Abraham Lincoln
 
1809
1865
 
> 4 U.S. Grant
 
1822
1888
 
> 5 Bill Taft
 
1850
1925
 
> 6 Herbert Hoover
 
1870
1945
 
> 7 FDR
 
1880
1945
 
> 8 Dwight Eisenhower
 
1890
1966
 
> 9 Richard Nixon
 
1920
2004
 
> 10 Ronald Reagan
 
1910
2006
 
--
_______________________________________________________________________
Dan Blum tool@panix.com
"I wouldn't have believed it myself if I hadn't just made it up."
Erland Sommarskog <esquel@sommarskog.se>: Aug 17 07:46PM +0200

> 1 George Washington
 
1726-1782
 
> 2 Thomas Jefferson
 
1736-1809
 
> 3 Abraham Lincoln
 
1790-1865
 
> 4 U.S. Grant
 
1834-1889
 
> 5 Bill Taft
 
1852-1926
 
> 6 Herbert Hoover
 
1865-1940
 
> 7 FDR
 
1870-1945
 
> 8 Dwight Eisenhower
 
1898-1971
 
> 9 Richard Nixon
 
1912-1982
 
> 10 Ronald Reagan
 
1911-1995
 
--
Erland Sommarskog, Stockholm, esquel@sommarskog.se
Dan Tilque <dtilque@frontier.com>: Aug 17 09:37PM -0700

Calvin wrote:
> RGTers
 
> Thanks to Mark for running RQ #264. Here is the sequel, Rotating Quiz #265. Its theme is American Presidents' lives. Listed below are 10 such presidents. Your task is to nominate the birth and death *year* for each one. So just respond with 2 years (birth, then death) under each president. A correct answer is worth 0 points, and you will lose 1 point for each year you are out by. The lowest total wins hosting rights for RQ #266. Good Luck!
 
> 1 George Washington
 
1722, 1798
 
> 2 Thomas Jefferson
 
1745, 1834
 
> 3 Abraham Lincoln
 
1809, 1865
 
> 4 U.S. Grant
 
1803, 1879
 
> 5 Bill Taft
 
1852, 1939
 
> 6 Herbert Hoover
 
1880, 1973
 
> 7 FDR
 
1881, 1945
 
> 8 Dwight Eisenhower
 
1886, 1967
 
> 9 Richard Nixon
 
1907, 1989
 
> 10 Ronald Reagan
 
1904, 1991
 
--
Dan Tilque
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Aug 17 10:33PM -0500

Mark Brader:
> > 6. Atom Egoyan filmed this 1997 bummer about life in a small BC
> > town after most of their children are lost in a school-bus
> > accident. What is its title?

Erland Sommarskog:
> (BC? I got the impression that it was actually in Northern US, which
> surprised me when I learnt about it.)
 
Apparently the original novel was set in the US, but Egoyan himself was
originally from BC and chose that setting:
 
http://www.metronews.ca/news/vancouver/2017/04/19/atom-egoyan-in-bc-to-mark-20-years-since-sweet-hereafter.html
 
I'd always assumed that the actual disaster that inspired the movie was
one in Quebec -- searching now, I was thinking of the one at Lac d'Argent
in 1978, which involved disabled people rather than children -- but if
Wikipedia is correct, the actual actual one was in Texas.
--
Mark Brader Twas unix and the C++
Toronto Did compile and load upon the vax:
msb@vex.net All Ritchie was the Kernighan,
And Lisp ran in GNU EMACS.
--Larry Colen (after Lewis Carroll)
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Aug 17 10:43PM -0500

Mark Brader:
> use this version of the handout:
 
> http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/G10R4/games2.jpg
 
> 1. Puerto Rico.
 
#15. 4 for Dan Blum, Peter, Pete, and Dan Tilque. 3 for Joshua.
2 for Calvin.
 
> 2. Carcassonne.
 
#17. 4 for Dan Blum.
 
> 3. Catan (formerly called Settlers of Catan).
 
#5. 4 for Dan Blum, Marc, Erland, Peter, and Dan Tilque.
3 for Joshua.
 
> 4. Risk.
 
#4. 4 for everyone -- Calvin, Dan Blum, Marc, Erland, Peter, Pete,
Joshua, Dan Tilque, and Jason.
 
> 5. Clue.
 
#14. (Apparently it's a Harry Potter edition!) 4 for Calvin,
Dan Blum, Marc, Peter, Joshua, and Jason.
 
> 6. King of Tokyo.
 
#13. 4 for Dan Blum, Joshua, and Dan Tilque. 2 for Calvin.
 
> 7. Codenames.
 
#2. 4 for Calvin, Dan Blum, Erland, Peter, Joshua, and Dan Tilque.
 
> 8. Forbidden Island.
 
#9. 4 for Dan Blum.
 
> 9. Ticket to Ride.
 
#8. 4 for Calvin, Dan Blum, Peter, Pete, Joshua, and Dan Tilque.
 
> 10. Pandemic.
 
#6. 4 for Dan Blum, Peter, Joshua, and Dan Tilque. 2 for Calvin.
 
 
> So there were 8 decoys. Decode the rot13 if you would like to
> identify them for fun, but for no points.
 
Nobody tried these.
 
> 11. Quirkle.
 
#7.
 
> 12. Dominion.
 
#10.
 
> 13. 7 Wonders.
 
#3.
 
> 14. Dixit.
 
#12.
 
> 15. Small World.
 
#18.
 
> 16. Agricola.
 
#11.
 
> 17. Exploding Kittens.
 
#16.
 
> 18. Arkham Horror.
 
#1.
 
 
> * Game 10, Round 6 - Canadiana - Canadian Movies
 
> Films made in Canada aren't always recognized in this country.
> This round does its best to change that.
 
Hah!
 
> in recent years. Dolan was already acclaimed as a director
> when he made this 2014 feature about familial angst. It won
> the Jury Prize at Cannes that year. Name it.
 
"Mommy".
 
> 2. Directed by Bruce McDonald and released in 1996, this
> mockumentary is about a fictional punk rock band touring
> western Canada. What is its title?
 
"Hard Core Logo". 4 for Joshua.
 
> Lepage is set in 1952 and concerns Quebec City as it awaits
> the arrival of Alfred Hitchcock to shoot his movie "I Confess".
> Name it.
 
"The Confessional". ("Le confessionnal".) 4 for Joshua.
 
> 4. Released in 1989, this Denys Arcand comedy-drama revolves around
> a group of actors who perform the Passion Play in a Quebec
> church. What is it called?
 
"Jesus of Montreal". (Jésus de Montréal".) 4 for Erland, Joshua,
and Jason.
 
> 5. Considered a classic of Canadian cinema, this 1971 drama features
> a teenage boy as he accompanies his uncle, an undertaker,
> to pick up the body of a similar-aged boy. Name it.
 
"Mon Oncle Antoine". ("My Uncle Antoine".)
 
> 6. Atom Egoyan filmed this 1997 bummer about life in a small BC
> town after most of their children are lost in a school-bus
> accident. What is its title?
 
"The Sweet Hereafter". 4 for Dan Blum, Marc, Erland, and Joshua.
 
> TV program that specializes in mutilation, torture, and murder.
> He sets out to find more about it but finds himself morbidly
> changed. Name the film.
 
"Videodrome". 4 for Dan Blum, Marc, and Jason.
 
As some entrants noted, the correct date was 1983. In fact this was
noticed during the original game, but it did not lead to a protest
and I forgot to correct it here. Sorry.
 
> 8. Yep, it had to be here. In this 1970 flick, Pete and Joey drive
> to Toronto from Nova Scotia to look for jobs. Trouble ensues.
> What is the movie's title?
 
"Goin' down the Road".
 
> an Academy Award nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay for this
> 2006 film about a husband dealing with his wife's Alzheimer's.
> Name it.
 
"Away from Her". 3 for Joshua.
 
> Minor, a stagecoach robber who is released from prison in 1901
> and goes on a tear to commit more robberies, this time on trains.
> What is it called?
 
"The Grey Fox". 4 for Marc.
 
 
Scores, if there are no errors:
 
GAME 10 ROUNDS-> 2 3 4 6 TOTALS
TOPICS-> Geo Sci Spo Can
Joshua Kreitzer 16 8 30 19 73
Dan Blum 8 11 40 8 67
Dan Tilque 8 10 28 0 46
Erland Sommarskog 16 3 12 8 39
"Calvin" 13 3 22 0 38
Marc Dashevsky 8 3 12 12 35
Pete Gayde 9 11 12 0 32
Peter Smyth -- -- 28 0 28
Jason Kreitzer 4 0 8 8 20
 
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "GUALITY IS FIRST"
msb@vex.net | --slogan of "Dongda electron CO.,LTD"
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
Calvin <334152@gmail.com>: Aug 17 05:14PM -0700

On Thursday, August 10, 2017 at 12:14:12 PM UTC+10, Calvin wrote:
 
> 1 Which legendary character of English folklore is a more dangerous man than the Sheriff of Nottingham? A hired assassin who tries to kill Robin Hood, he is also a rival for Maid Marion's love.
 
Guy of Gisborne
 
> 2 In which sport can misconduct see a player receive a yellow, red or green card?
 
[Field] Hockey
 
> 3 The city of Malaga is located in which European country?
 
Spain
 
> 4 Who directed "Bridge on the River Kwai" (1957) and "Lawrence of Arabia" (1962)?
 
David Lean
 
> 5 The Eightfold Path and the Four Noble Truths are important concepts in which religion?
 
Buddhism
 
> 6 In the Tour de France, which rider wears the polka dot jersey?
 
"King of the Mountains" or similar
 
> 7 In which US city was the 1987 Brian de Palma film 'The Untouchables' set?
 
Chicago
 
> 8 Which Chilean General overthrew Salvador Allende in 1973?
 
Augusto Pinochet
 
> 9 Though first released in 1976, the dystopian rock song "Miami 2017 (Seen the Lights Go Out on Broadway)" has undergone something of a revival this year. Which American singer-songwriter wrote and originally recorded it?
 
Billy Joel
No-one got this. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miami_2017_(Seen_the_Lights_Go_Out_on_Broadway)
 
 
> 10 Andrew Lloyd Webber wrote the music for "Evita", but who wrote the lyrics?
 
Tim Rice
 
 
Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q5 Q6 Q7 Q8 Q9 Q10 TOTAL TB Quiz 498
0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 7 40 Pete Gayde
0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 6 30 Peter Smyth
0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 6 30 Erland S
1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 6 36 Chris Johnson
1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 6 36 Mark Brader
1 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 5 30 Dan Blum
0 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 5 30 Dan Tilque
0 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 4 27 Marc Dashevsky
- - - - - - - - - - --- ----------
3 2 6 6 7 4 6 8 0 3 45 56%
 
Congratulations Pete.
 
cheers,
calvin
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Aug 15 12:01AM -0500

Mark Brader:
> number on the handout map:
 
> http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/G10R2/map.jpg
 
> 1. Mumbai (Bombay).
 
#9. 4 for Joshua, Erland, Dan Tilque, and Marc. 3 for Dan Blum.
2 for Calvin and Pete.
 
> 2. Kolkata (Calcutta).
 
#2. 4 for Joshua, Erland, Calvin, Dan Tilque, and Pete.
 
> 3. Bhopal.
 
#8. 3 for Pete.
 
> 4. Hyderabad.
 
#3. 4 for Joshua, Erland, and Jason.
 
> 5. Jaipur.
 
#5.
 
> 6. Lucknow.
 
#12. 3 for Calvin.
 
> 7. Bengaluru (Bangalore).
 
#4. 4 for Erland. 2 for Dan Blum.
 
> 8. Agra.
 
#6. 4 for Marc. 2 for Calvin.
 
> 9. Ahmedabad.
 
#11. 2 for Joshua.
 
> 10. Nagpur.
 
#13. 3 for Dan Blum. 2 for Joshua and Calvin.
 
> I think they are, and identify them on the map for fun, but for
> no points.
 
> 11. Ludhiana.
 
#1.
 
> 12. Surat.
 
#15.
 
> 13. Chennai (Madras).
 
#10. Erland got this.
 
> 14. Pune.
 
#14. Erland got this.
 
> 15. Indore.
 
#16.
 
> 16. Patna.
 
#7.
 
> 17. Kanpur.
 
#17.
 
 
 
> or institute. It might be Canadian, foreign, or international
> in nature. Except as noted you must give the *full name* of the
> organization in each case -- acronyms are not sufficient.
 
In the original game, this was the hardest round in the entire season.
 
> supporting industrial innovation to clients and partners and
> providing scientific and technical services. It also brings
> you the official 1:00 time signal.
 
National Research Council.
 
> 2. A Crown corporation, it is the country's largest nuclear science
> laboratory. It developed the CANDU reactor.
 
Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd.
 
> based in Victoria. It is named for a German-Canadian physicist
> and chemist who won a Nobel Prize in 1971. His name will
> be sufficient.
 
Gerhard Herzberg (Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics).
 
> associations that regulate the engineering profession in Canada.
> The organization changed its name in 2007 as part of a rebranding
> exercise. What is its current name?
 
Engineers Canada.
 
> its exploits have been featured in Hollywood films, including
> one directed by Ron Howard. It is best known by its acronym.
> But what is the full name of this agency?
 
National Aeronautics and Space Administration. 4 for Joshua,
Dan Tilque, and Pete.
 
> of Nobel Prizes received funding from this large US government
> agency established in the late 1800s. Its focus is on medical
> research and it has an annual budget of $32,000,000,000.
 
National Institutes of Health. 4 for Joshua, Dan Blum, and Pete.
 
> 7. A not-for-profit British organization, it received its Royal
> Charter in 1848. Its stated goal is to advance excellence in
> the chemical sciences.
 
Royal Society of Chemistry. (Not the Royal Society: different group.)
3 for Dan Tilque.
 
By the way, the Royal Society, or in full the Royal Society of
London for Improving Natural Knowledge, goes back to 1660 -- its
early presidents included Isaac Newton.
 
> 8. This organization was established in 1922 in Brussels with
> 13 member countries, including Canada. Its goal is to promote
> international cooperation in physics.
 
International Union of Pure and Applied Physics.
 
> 9. Founded by scientists and students at MIT in 1969, this
> non-profit organization lobbies for scientific research to be
> focused on solving environmental and social problems.
 
Union of Concerned Scientists. 4 for Dan Blum.
 
> in 75 countries, including Canada. It was founded in 1971
> and calls itself the world's largest grassroots environmental
> network.
 
Friends of the Earth was the expected answer, but Greenpeace comes
close to meeting the description also. Both groups took some time
to be formed, both during the period 1969-72, and both have branches
in dozens of countries, although Greenpeace has a fewer and the
self-description mentioned is indeed that of FOE. Greenpeace is an
advocacy group and not exactly a scientific organization like most
answers in this round, but then so is FOE. So I've decided to score
Greenpeace as almost correct. So, 3 for Erland, Dan Blum, Calvin,
Dan Tilque, Marc, and Pete.
 
 
Scores, if there are no errors:
 
GAME 10 ROUNDS-> 2 3 TOTALS
TOPICS-> Geo Sci
Joshua Kreitzer 16 8 24
Pete Gayde 9 11 20
Dan Blum 8 11 19
Erland Sommarskog 16 3 19
Dan Tilque 8 10 18
"Calvin" 13 3 16
Marc Dashevsky 8 3 11
Jason Kreitzer 4 0 4
 
--
Mark Brader "The great strength of the totalitarian state
Toronto is that it will force those who fear it
msb@vex.net to imitate it." -- Hitler (alleged)
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
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Thursday, August 17, 2017

Digest for rec.games.trivia@googlegroups.com - 6 updates in 3 topics

Calvin <334152@gmail.com>: Aug 16 09:24PM -0700

RGTers
 
Thanks to Mark for running RQ #264. Here is the sequel, Rotating Quiz #265. Its theme is American Presidents' lives. Listed below are 10 such presidents. Your task is to nominate the birth and death *year* for each one. So just respond with 2 years (birth, then death) under each president. A correct answer is worth 0 points, and you will lose 1 point for each year you are out by. The lowest total wins hosting rights for RQ #266. Good Luck!
 
1 George Washington
2 Thomas Jefferson
3 Abraham Lincoln
4 U.S. Grant
5 Bill Taft
6 Herbert Hoover
7 FDR
8 Dwight Eisenhower
9 Richard Nixon
10 Ronald Reagan
 
cheers,
calvin
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Aug 17 01:50AM -0500

"Calvin":
> 1 George Washington
 
1720-1810.
 
> 2 Thomas Jefferson
 
1730-1824.
 
> 3 Abraham Lincoln
 
1812-1865.
 
> 4 U.S. Grant
 
1812-1890.
 
> 5 Bill Taft
 
1860-1920.
 
> 6 Herbert Hoover
 
1880-1945.
 
> 7 FDR
 
1880-1945.
 
> 8 Dwight Eisenhower
 
1890-1968.
 
> 9 Richard Nixon
 
1910-1990.
 
> 10 Ronald Reagan
 
1910-1999.
 
If this entry happens to win, due to travel plans the earliest I would be
able to start the next contest would be about August 29.
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "Professor, I think I have a counterexample."
msb@vex.net | "That's all right; I have two proofs."
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
Jason Kreitzer <jk71875@gmail.com>: Aug 16 07:14PM -0700

On Tuesday, August 15, 2017 at 1:07:24 AM UTC-4, Mark Brader wrote:
> use this version of the handout:
 
> http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/G10R4/games2.jpg
 
> 1. Puerto Rico.
1.
> 2. Carcassonne.
2.
> 3. Catan (formerly called Settlers of Catan).
3.
> 4. Risk.
4.
> 5. Clue.
14.
> 6. King of Tokyo.
6.
> 7. Codenames.
7.
> 8. Forbidden Island.
8.
> 9. Ticket to Ride.
9.
> 10. Pandemic.
10.
 
> 4. Released in 1989, this Denys Arcand comedy-drama revolves around
> a group of actors who perform the Passion Play in a Quebec
> church. What is it called?
"Jesus of Montreal"
> TV program that specializes in mutilation, torture, and murder.
> He sets out to find more about it but finds himself morbidly
> changed. Name the film.
"Videodrome"
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Aug 16 09:00PM -0500

Rotating Quiz #264 is ofter. Sadly, there were only 4 entrants.
The winner is the person posting as "Calvin", who scored more
than double the second-place finisher -- so, moderately hearty
congratulations!
 
Mark Brader:
> be accepted. (In two cases it's uncertain, or there's conflicting
> information, as to whether they do truly fit the theme or not.
> Don't worry about that; just assume they do.)
 
The theme, of course, was "named after animals".
 
> people answer correctly, they each get 6 points; if 3 do, they each
> get 4; and if all 4 get it, that's 3 points each. This should give
> you a strong incentive to answer the questions that nobody else can.
 
Since 4 was in fact the number of entrants, the scoring example is
exactly what was used.
 
 
1. Anaconda (part of the 1997 movie poster, title blurred out).
6 for Dan Blum and Calvin.
 
2. Bern or Berne (Switzerland, allegedly named after bears).
 
3. Jaguar (a recent or current year XF model, I think -- I lost the
URL where I found this exact image).
 
4. Osprey (otherwise known as a Boeing V-22). 6 for Dan Blum
and Dan Tilque.
 
5. Panther (WW2-era German tank, specifically a model G, preserved
in Belgium). 12 for Calvin. (The word "Panther" is the same in
German and English, whereas "Panzer" is simply German for "tank"
and therefore wrong. And even if you didn't know what they looked
like, it wasn't going to be a Tiger tank, their other best-known one,
because Tiger was used on #9.)
 
6. Scorpius, the Scorpion (constellation, of course; accepting
Scorpio). 6 for Marc and Calvin.
 
7. "Chayka" or "The Seagull" (play by Anton Chekhov).
 
8. Seal (singer, allegedly named after a seal in a children's book).
6 for Dan Blum and Calvin.
 
9. Tiger (Detroit Tigers relief pitcher Alex Wilson). 12 for Calvin.
(You only had to recognize the team logo.)
 
10. Wolverine (comic-book and later movie character). 4 for Dan Blum,
Dan Tilque, and Calvin.
 
 
Scores, if there are no errors:
 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 TOTALS
 
"Calvin" 6 0 0 0 12 6 0 6 12 4 46
Dan Blum 6 0 0 6 0 0 0 6 0 4 22
Dan Tilque 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 4 10
Marc Dashevsky 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 6
 
12 0 0 12 12 12 0 12 12 12
 
 
Thanks to all who played, and it's over to Calvin for RQ 265.
--
Mark Brader | "...it's always easier to see the mud when it's
Toronto | coming toward your side rather than from your side."
msb@vex.net | --Mike Kruger
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Aug 16 09:00PM -0500

[Reposting with the right subject line]
 
Rotating Quiz #264 is ofter. Sadly, there were only 4 entrants.
The winner is the person posting as "Calvin", who scored more
than double the second-place finisher -- so, moderately hearty
congratulations!
 
Mark Brader:
> be accepted. (In two cases it's uncertain, or there's conflicting
> information, as to whether they do truly fit the theme or not.
> Don't worry about that; just assume they do.)
 
The theme, of course, was "named after animals".
 
> people answer correctly, they each get 6 points; if 3 do, they each
> get 4; and if all 4 get it, that's 3 points each. This should give
> you a strong incentive to answer the questions that nobody else can.
 
Since 4 was in fact the number of entrants, the scoring example is
exactly what was used.
 
 
1. Anaconda (part of the 1997 movie poster, title blurred out).
6 for Dan Blum and Calvin.
 
2. Bern or Berne (Switzerland, allegedly named after bears).
 
3. Jaguar (a recent or current year XF model, I think -- I lost the
URL where I found this exact image).
 
4. Osprey (otherwise known as a Boeing V-22). 6 for Dan Blum
and Dan Tilque.
 
5. Panther (WW2-era German tank, specifically a model G, preserved
in Belgium). 12 for Calvin. (The word "Panther" is the same in
German and English, whereas "Panzer" is simply German for "tank"
and therefore wrong. And even if you didn't know what they looked
like, it wasn't going to be a Tiger tank, their other best-known one,
because Tiger was used on #9.)
 
6. Scorpius, the Scorpion (constellation, of course; accepting
Scorpio). 6 for Marc and Calvin.
 
7. "Chayka" or "The Seagull" (play by Anton Chekhov).
 
8. Seal (singer, allegedly named after a seal in a children's book).
6 for Dan Blum and Calvin.
 
9. Tiger (Detroit Tigers relief pitcher Alex Wilson). 12 for Calvin.
(You only had to recognize the team logo.)
 
10. Wolverine (comic-book and later movie character). 4 for Dan Blum,
Dan Tilque, and Calvin.
 
 
Scores, if there are no errors:
 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 TOTALS
 
"Calvin" 6 0 0 0 12 6 0 6 12 4 46
Dan Blum 6 0 0 6 0 0 0 6 0 4 22
Dan Tilque 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 4 10
Marc Dashevsky 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 6
 
12 0 0 12 12 12 0 12 12 12
 
 
Thanks to all who played, and it's over to Calvin for RQ 265.
--
Mark Brader | "...it's always easier to see the mud when it's
Toronto | coming toward your side rather than from your side."
msb@vex.net | --Mike Kruger
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
Calvin <334152@gmail.com>: Aug 16 07:07PM -0700

On Thursday, August 17, 2017 at 12:00:13 PM UTC+10, Mark Brader wrote:
 
> Thanks to all who played, and it's over to Calvin for RQ 265.
 
Thanks, I guess. Should have something up by tomorrow.
 
cheers,
calvin
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Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Digest for rec.games.trivia@googlegroups.com - 9 updates in 2 topics

tool@panix.com (Dan Blum): Aug 15 01:44PM


> * Game 10, Round 4 - Sports - Board Games
 
> 1. Puerto Rico.
 
15
 
> 2. Carcassonne.
 
17
 
> 3. Catan (formerly called Settlers of Catan).
 
5
 
> 4. Risk.
 
4
 
> 5. Clue.
 
14
 
> 6. King of Tokyo.
 
13
 
> 7. Codenames.
 
2
 
> 8. Forbidden Island.
 
9
 
> 9. Ticket to Ride.
 
8
 
> 10. Pandemic.
 
6
 
 
> 6. Atom Egoyan filmed this 1997 bummer about life in a small BC
> town after most of their children are lost in a school-bus
> accident. What is its title?
 
The Sweet Hereafter
 
> TV program that specializes in mutilation, torture, and murder.
> He sets out to find more about it but finds himself morbidly
> changed. Name the film.
 
Videodrome
 
> Minor, a stagecoach robber who is released from prison in 1901
> and goes on a tear to commit more robberies, this time on trains.
> What is it called?
 
The Great Train Robber
 
--
_______________________________________________________________________
Dan Blum tool@panix.com
"I wouldn't have believed it myself if I hadn't just made it up."
tool@panix.com (Dan Blum): Aug 15 01:47PM

> > He sets out to find more about it but finds himself morbidly
> > changed. Name the film.
 
> Videodrome
 
After checking I am pretty sure this is the correct answer, but it
came out in 1983. According to IMDB Cronenberg did not have any movie
come out in 1997.
 
--
_______________________________________________________________________
Dan Blum tool@panix.com
"I wouldn't have believed it myself if I hadn't just made it up."
Marc Dashevsky <usenet@MarcDashevsky.com>: Aug 15 10:44AM -0500

In article <nK-dnbdo2fQaHA_EnZ2dnUU7-THNnZ2d@giganews.com>, msb@vex.net says...
 
> 1. Puerto Rico.
> 2. Carcassonne.
> 3. Catan (formerly called Settlers of Catan).
5
 
> 4. Risk.
4
 
> 5. Clue.
14
 
 
> 6. Atom Egoyan filmed this 1997 bummer about life in a small BC
> town after most of their children are lost in a school-bus
> accident. What is its title?
The Sweet Hereafter
 
> TV program that specializes in mutilation, torture, and murder.
> He sets out to find more about it but finds himself morbidly
> changed. Name the film.
Videodrome (wrong year in question)
 
> Minor, a stagecoach robber who is released from prison in 1901
> and goes on a tear to commit more robberies, this time on trains.
> What is it called?
Grey Fox
 
 
--
Replace "usenet" with "marc" in the e-mail address.
Erland Sommarskog <esquel@sommarskog.se>: Aug 15 08:58PM +0200

> * Game 10, Round 4 - Sports - Board Games
 
> 1. Puerto Rico.
 
18
 
> 2. Carcassonne.
 
14
 
> 3. Catan (formerly called Settlers of Catan).
 
5
 
> 4. Risk.
 
4 (The only one I know)
 
> 5. Clue.
 
2
 
> 6. King of Tokyo.
 
3
 
> 7. Codenames.
 
2
 
> 8. Forbidden Island.
 
15
 
> 9. Ticket to Ride.
 
6
 
> 10. Pandemic.
 
13
 
 
> * Game 10, Round 6 - Canadiana - Canadian Movies
 
Not bad! I've seen two out of ten, definitely above average!

> 4. Released in 1989, this Denys Arcand comedy-drama revolves around
> a group of actors who perform the Passion Play in a Quebec
> church. What is it called?
 
Jésus de Montréal
 
> 6. Atom Egoyan filmed this 1997 bummer about life in a small BC
> town after most of their children are lost in a school-bus
> accident. What is its title?
 
The Sweet Hereafter
 
(BC? I got the impression that it was actually in Northern US, which
surprised me when I learnt about it.)
 

 
 
 
--
Erland Sommarskog, Stockholm, esquel@sommarskog.se
"Peter Smyth" <smythp@gmail.com>: Aug 15 08:58PM

Mark Brader wrote:
 
> use this version of the handout:
 
> http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/G10R4/games2.jpg
 
> 1. Puerto Rico.
15
> 2. Carcassonne.
> 3. Catan (formerly called Settlers of Catan).
5
> 4. Risk.
4
> 5. Clue.
14
> 6. King of Tokyo.
> 7. Codenames.
2
> 8. Forbidden Island.
> 9. Ticket to Ride.
8
> 10. Pandemic.
6
> 16. Agricola.
> 17. Exploding Kittens.
> 18. Arkham Horror.
 
Peter Smyth
Pete Gayde <pagrsg@wowway.com>: Aug 16 01:23AM

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote in news:nK-dnbdo2fQaHA_EnZ2dnUU7-
> use this version of the handout:
 
> http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/G10R4/games2.jpg
 
> 1. Puerto Rico.
 
15
 
> 2. Carcassonne.
> 3. Catan (formerly called Settlers of Catan).
> 4. Risk.
 
4
 
> 5. Clue.
 
3
 
> 6. King of Tokyo.
 
12
 
> 7. Codenames.
> 8. Forbidden Island.
 
5
 
> 9. Ticket to Ride.
 
8
 
> Minor, a stagecoach robber who is released from prison in 1901
> and goes on a tear to commit more robberies, this time on trains.
> What is it called?
 
Pete Gayde
Joshua Kreitzer <gromit82@hotmail.com>: Aug 16 03:46AM

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote in news:nK-dnbdo2fQaHA_EnZ2dnUU7-
> identify the picture on the handout:
 
> http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/G10R4/games3.jpg
 
> 1. Puerto Rico.
 
15; 3
 
> 2. Carcassonne.
 
1; 3
 
> 3. Catan (formerly called Settlers of Catan).
 
5; 15
 
> 4. Risk.
 
4
 
> 5. Clue.
 
14
 
> 6. King of Tokyo.
 
13
 
> 7. Codenames.
 
2
 
> 8. Forbidden Island.
 
13; 18
 
> 9. Ticket to Ride.
 
8
 
> 10. Pandemic.
 
6
 
> in recent years. Dolan was already acclaimed as a director
> when he made this 2014 feature about familial angst. It won
> the Jury Prize at Cannes that year. Name it.
 
"C.R.A.Z.Y."
 
> 2. Directed by Bruce McDonald and released in 1996, this
> mockumentary is about a fictional punk rock band touring
> western Canada. What is its title?
 
"Hard Core Logo"

> Lepage is set in 1952 and concerns Quebec City as it awaits
> the arrival of Alfred Hitchcock to shoot his movie "I Confess".
> Name it.
 
"Le confessionel"
 
> 4. Released in 1989, this Denys Arcand comedy-drama revolves around
> a group of actors who perform the Passion Play in a Quebec
> church. What is it called?
 
"Jesus of Montreal"

> 6. Atom Egoyan filmed this 1997 bummer about life in a small BC
> town after most of their children are lost in a school-bus
> accident. What is its title?
 
"The Sweet Hereafter"
 
> an Academy Award nomination for Best Adapted Screenplay for this
> 2006 film about a husband dealing with his wife's Alzheimer's.
> Name it.
 
"Away with Her"

--
Joshua Kreitzer
gromit82@hotmail.com
Dan Tilque <dtilque@frontier.com>: Aug 15 10:31PM -0700

Mark Brader wrote:
> use this version of the handout:
 
> http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/G10R4/games2.jpg
 
> 1. Puerto Rico.
 
15
 
> 2. Carcassonne.
> 3. Catan (formerly called Settlers of Catan).
 
5
 
> 4. Risk.
 
4
 
> 5. Clue.
> 6. King of Tokyo.
 
13
 
> 7. Codenames.
 
2
 
> 8. Forbidden Island.
 
18
 
> 9. Ticket to Ride.
 
8
 
> 10. Pandemic.
 
6
 
 
--
Dan Tilque
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Aug 15 09:23PM -0500

This is a reminder that Rotating Quiz #264, based on the following
array of images:
 
http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/rq/264.jpg
 
, is now in its last 21 hours.
 
The more the merrier! See the original posting for further details.
--
Mark Brader, Toronto "... pure English is de rigueur"
msb@vex.net -- Guardian Weekly
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
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