Wednesday, November 22, 2017

Digest for rec.games.trivia@googlegroups.com - 11 updates in 3 topics

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Nov 21 05:29PM -0600

Mark Brader:
>> nominations for writing, directing, and as producer of the
>> Best Picture, and he did win one of those awards; but we're
>> only asking about his acting nominations, from 1967 to 1991.
 
Marc Dashevsky:
> He won for Heavan Can Wait
 
No, he has never won for acting. But I will score this as an answer
of "Heaven Can Wait".
--
Mark Brader "I can see the time when every city will have one."
Toronto -- An American mayor's reaction to the
msb@vex.net news of the invention of the telephone
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Nov 21 05:38PM -0600

Mark Brader:
> correct answers in about 3 days... For further information see
> my 2017-09-25 companion posting on "Questions from the Canadian
> Inquisition (QFTCI*)".
 
Sorry I let this run late -- in truth, with only 5 answer slates in,
it did not occur to me that the time period might be up. I knew the
Canadiana round would be hard but I didn't think the entertainment
round was.
 
 
> for such films as "Jurassic Park" and "Superman" as well as
> various "Star Wars", Indiana Jones, and Harry Potter movies?
> Answer within 2 nominations.
 
50 (accepting 48-52; nobody came within double the allowed leeway
either).
 
By the way, his 5 wins so far have been for:
"Fiddler on the Roof" (1971), "Jaws" (1975), "Star Wars" (1977),
"E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial" (1982), "Schindler's List" (1993).
 
> and the leading acting loser with 17 -- you may remember our
> recent round on some of the actresses who beat her. Name any
> of the 3 movies that she did win for.
 
"Kramer vs. Kramer" (1979), "Sophie's Choice" (1982),
"The Iron Lady" (2011). 4 for Joshua, Dan Tilque, and Dan Blum.
 
 
> 3. Peter O'Toole: The all-time loser, with 8 nominations and no
> wins between 1962 and 2006 inclusive. (All dates given are
> the dates of the movies' release, not the Oscar ceremonies.)
 
"Lawrence of Arabia" (1962), "Becket" (1964),
"The Lion in Winter" (1968), "Goodbye, Mr. Chips" (1969),
"The Ruling Class" (1972), "The Stunt Man" (1980),
"My Favorite Year" (1982), "Venus" (2006). 4 for everyone --
Joshua, Marc, Dan Tilque, Dan Blum, and Calvin.
 
> 4. Deborah Kerr ["Car"], who went 0-for-6 from 1949 to 1960.
 
"Edward, My Son" (1949), "From Here to Eternity" (1953),
"The King and I" (1956), "Heaven Knows, Mr. Allison" (1957),
"Separate Tables" (1958), "The Sundowners" (1960). 4 for Marc
and Calvin.
 
> 5. Ed Harris: 4 nominations, no wins from 1995 to 2002.
 
"Apollo 13" (1995), "The Truman Show" (1998), "Pollock" (2000),
"The Hours" (2002). 4 for Joshua, Dan Blum, and Calvin.
 
> 6. Glenn Close: 0-for-6 like Deborah Kerr, from 1982 to 2011.
 
"The World According to Garp" (1982), "The Big Chill" (1983),
"The Natural" (1984), "Fatal Attraction" (1987),
"Dangerous Liaisons" (1988), "Albert Nobbs" (2011). 4 for
everyone -- in Calvin's case, the hard way.
 
> 7. Richard Burton: right behind his buddy Peter O'Toole with
> 7 losses, from 1952 to 1977.
 
"My Cousin Rachel" (1952), "The Robe" (1953), "Becket" (1964),
"The Spy Who Came In from the Cold" (1965), "Who's Afraid
of Virginia Woolf?" (1966), "Anne of the Thousand Days" (1969),
"Equus" (1977). 4 for Joshua.
 
> 8. Albert Finney: 5 nominations from 1963 to 2000.
 
"Tom Jones" (1963), "Murder on the Orient Express"
(1974), "The Dresser" (1983), "Under the Volcano" (1984),
"Erin Brockovich" (2000). 4 for Joshua, Marc, and Dan Blum.
2 for Calvin.
 
> 9. Amy Adams: 5 nominations from 2005 to 2013.
 
"Junebug" (2005), "Doubt" (2008), "The Fighter" (2010),
"The Master" (2012), "American Hustle" (2013). 4 for Joshua, Marc,
and Dan Blum.
 
> nominations for writing, directing, and as producer of the
> Best Picture, and he did win one of those awards; but we're
> only asking about his acting nominations, from 1967 to 1991.
 
"Bonnie and Clyde" (1967), "Heaven Can Wait" (1978), "Reds" (1981)
[for which he won Best Director], "Bugsy" (1991). 4 for Joshua,
Marc, and Dan Blum.
 
 
> * Game 5, Round 8 - Canadiana - The Tragically Hip
 
Even in the original game, this was the hardest round.
 
> 1. Name the graphic novel and musical concept album written by
> Gord Downie in 2016 that was made into an animated TV-movie of
> the same title.
 
"Secret Path".
 
> their fourth studio album. The previous year they had
> re-mastered and re-released this album, with two new tracks.
> Name the album.
 
"Fully Completely".
 
> the 2017 TIFF. It was slated to be televised in November 2017,
> but following Downie's death the network moved the broadcast
> up to October 20. Name it.
 
"Long Time Running".
 
> 4. Name any other member of the band other than Gord Downie.
 
Rob (Bobbie) Baker, Johnny Fay, Paul Langlois, Davis Manning,
Gord Sinclair.
 
> 5. Within 1, how many Hip albums have reached #1 in Canada?
 
9 (accepting 8-10). 3 for Joshua. 2 for Dan Blum.
 
> 6. Within 1, how many Junos has the band won (not counting
> individual wins by Downie himself)?
 
16 (accepting 15-17).
 
> 7. The Tragically Hip were "discovered" by Bruce Dickinson, then
> president of MCA, at what Toronto venue in the mid-1980s?
 
Horseshoe Tavern.
 
> of their first song wrong, later claiming he did so because he
> was so nervous. Give either the correct line or the line that
> Downie actually sang.
 
"He said I'm fabulously rich" became "He said I'm tragically hip".
 
The song was "Grace, Too". Some sources say Downie often sang it that
way at live appearances; perhaps this was only after the "SNL" show.
 
> last album -- or at least it'll be the last one to contain
> newly recorded content featuring Downie. What is the name of
> the tour and album?
 
"Man Machine Poem".
 
> residential schools and tried to walk home. He completed
> about 30 miles of the 400-mile (650 km) journey before dying
> of exposure. Give his first or last name.
 
Chanie Wenjack (not Charlie, as was reported when this happened
in 1967).
 
See: http://www.macleans.ca/society/the-lonely-death-of-chanie-wenjack/
 
 
Scores, if there are no errors:
 
GAME 5 ROUNDS-> 2 3 5 6 7 8 BEST
TOPICS-> His Geo Art Spo Ent Can FOUR
Joshua Kreitzer 33 26 10 36 32 3 127
Dan Blum 26 31 12 0 28 2 97
Marc Dashevsky 12 32 12 20 24 0 88
Pete Gayde 16 30 4 34 -- -- 84
Dan Tilque 40 32 -- -- 12 0 84
"Calvin" 21 0 10 8 18 0 57
Peter Smyth 23 29 -- -- -- -- 52
Erland Sommarskog 20 24 4 0 -- -- 48
Gareth Owen -- -- 4 24 -- -- 28
Jason Kreitzer 8 12 -- -- -- -- 20
 
--
Mark Brader | (As you might imagine, the "difficulties" are all
Toronto | bureaucratic and competential, not technical.)
msb@vex.net | --Steve Summit
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
Jason Kreitzer <jk71875@gmail.com>: Nov 21 09:25PM -0800

On Saturday, November 18, 2017 at 1:40:21 AM UTC-5, Mark Brader wrote:
> for such films as "Jurassic Park" and "Superman" as well as
> various "Star Wars", Indiana Jones, and Harry Potter movies?
> Answer within 2 nominations.
40
> and the leading acting loser with 17 -- you may remember our
> recent round on some of the actresses who beat her. Name any
> of the 3 movies that she did win for.
Kramer vs. Kramer?
 
> 6. Glenn Close: 0-for-6 like Deborah Kerr, from 1982 to 2011.
 
> 7. Richard Burton: right behind his buddy Peter O'Toole with
> 7 losses, from 1952 to 1977.
"The Lion in Winter"
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Nov 22 12:54AM -0600

If Jason Kreitzer had posted his answers on time, he would have scored
4 points on Round 7 and 0 on Round 8.
--
Mark Brader "One might as well complain about the Sun
Toronto rising in the daytime instead of at night,
msb@vex.net when we need it more." -- John Lawler
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Nov 21 05:41PM -0600

These questions were written to be asked in Toronto on 2017-10-23,
and should be interpreted accordingly.
 
On each question you may give up to two answers, but if you give
both a right answer and a wrong answer, there is a small penalty.
Please post all your answers to the newsgroup in a single followup,
based only on your own knowledge. (In your answer posting, quote
the questions and place your answer below each one.) I will reveal
the correct answers in about 3 days.
 
All questions were written by members of Smith & Guessin' and are
used here by permission, but have been reformatted and may have
been retyped and/or edited by me. For further information see
my 2017-09-25 companion posting on "Questions from the Canadian
Inquisition (QFTCI*)".
 
 
** Game 5, Round 9 - Science - The Periodic Table
 
The following is a round on the periodic table. The handout:
 
http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/g5r9/mendel.png
 
is provided to help you visualize the table and the elements'
relations to each other.
 
1. Each row in the periodic table is grouped based on its highest
unexcited electron energy level, similar to an orbit around
the nucleus. What is the term used for each row?
 
2. Elements in each column in the periodic table share the same
number of valence electrons, which governs their bonding
behavior. What is the name for a column?
 
3. The number in the top left of the each element's box indicates
the number of protons that are found in the element's nucleus.
What is this called?
 
4. The number just below each element's abbreviation is called
its atomic mass. What is the simple approximation to estimate
the atomic mass in whole numbers?
 
5. Please decode the rot13 for this question only after you have
finished with the earlier ones. Lbh jvyy abgvpr gung gur ngbzvp
znffrf ner abg npghnyyl jubyr ahzoref, nf gur erny pnyphyngvba
sbe ngbzvp znff vf n ovg gevpxvre guna "ahzore bs cebgbaf
cyhf ahzore bs arhgebaf va gur ahpyrhf". Abg bayl qbrf vg hfr
zber-cerpvfr inyhrf guna 1 sbe rnpu cnegvpyr, vg nyfb gnxrf vagb
nppbhag gur qvssrerag sbezf bs gur ryrzrag gung bpphe va angher.
Fcrpvsvpnyyl, znal ryrzragf pna rkvfg va zhygvcyr sbezf jvgu
qvssrerag ahzoref bs arhgebaf. Jung ner gurfr qvssrerag sbezf
bs na ryrzrag pbyyrpgviryl pnyyrq?
 
6. There are a number of other trends that can be observed looking
at the periodic table. One such trend is an element's ability
to attract the electrons in an atomic bond. Moving vertically or
horizontally in the table, this value generally increases toward
the top or the right side. What is this chemical characteristic
known as?
 
7. Another characteristic for each element is the amount of energy
needed to remove its first valence electron, or its most loosely
attracted electron. This also generally increases toward the
top or the right side of the table. What is the term for this
amount of energy?
 
8. Elements in the far right column have no valence electrons,
instead having full electron orbital shells. Because of this
they are incredibly unreactive, almost always existing in
monatomic states. What is the modern name for these elements?
 
9. Elements in the far left column have only one valence electron
and so have a low <answer 7>, readily losing that electron to
form a cation ["CAT-eye-on"]. They are known to react violently
with water, but form weaker bonds with metallic elements.
What are these elements known as?
 
10. The light blue elements just to the right of the middle are ones
that demonstrate both metallic and non-metallic characteristics.
They may look metallic, but are often brittle and cannot
conduct electricity well. Collectively they are sometimes
known as semimetals, but what is the other name for them,
used in chemistry?
 
 
** Game 5, Round 10 - Tragically Challenge Round
 
This week's challenge round categories are in honor of the passing
of Gord Downie.
 
* A. Entertainment: "Grace, Too"
 
A1. What 1953 film is credited with launching Grace Kelly's
movie career? Her performance earned her a Best Supporting
Actress Oscar nomination and a Golden Globe. It featured
Clark Gable and Ava Gardner.
 
A2. Grace Kelly's last movie before retiring from acting to marry
Prince Rainier III was a 1956 musical comedy based on the
play "The Philadelphia Story". She starred alongside Bing
Crosby and Frank Sinatra. What was the movie's title?
 
 
* B. Science: "Little Bones"
 
B1. The three smallest bones in the body are found in the
middle ear. They are known individually as the hammer,
the anvil, and the stirrup -- but what is the collective
name for this group of bones? (No, don't try "ear bones".)
 
B2. There are a number of small bones in your wrist, including
the trapezoid, pisiform, and hamate. What is the collective
name given to this group of bones?
 
 
* C. Arts & Literature: "38 Years Old"
 
The following questions deal with artists and authors who died at
age 38. Name them.
 
C1. This Italian painter was considered one of the major
influences on the Baroque style due to his realistic
portrayal of humans and use of lighting. He was considered
a rival of Michelangelo, and died in 1610 due to an unknown
disease. Famous works include "Beheading of St. John the
Baptist", "Bacchus", and "Head of Medusa".
 
C2. This Victorian author died due to complications during her
pregnancy in 1855. Only three novels were published in her
lifetime: the two less wildly popular ones were "Shirley"
and "Villette".
 
 
* D. History: "Nautical Disaster"
 
D1. One of the worst nautical disasters in history happened here
in Canada -- during World War I in Halifax, when a French
munitions ship collided with a Norwegian ship. Name *either*
ship involved in the disaster, which resulted in over
1,900 deaths.
 
D2. The all-time worst nautical disaster in non-war conditions
occurred when the ferry Doña Paz collided with an oil tanker
in the Tablas Strait. Due to the illegal sale of tickets
and the vessel being overloaded, it is believed over 4,000
people died in the incident. What national capital city
was the ferry headed towards?
 
 
* E. Sports: "Courage"
 
E1. In the 1988 NLCS this player injured both his left hamstring
and his right knee, and many expected him out for the World
Series. He ended up pinch-hitting, and in the bottom of
the 9th hit a 2-run walk off home run in the first game of
the World Series for the Los Angeles Dodgers, who would go
on to win the Series. Name him.
 
E2. This 49ers Hall of Fame safety/cornerback had his pinky
crushed during play in 1985. In preference to reconstructive
surgery that would put him out for a whole season, he decided
to have the finder amputated so he could play. Who was he?
 
 
* F. Geography: "Bobcaygeon"
 
F1. Bobcaygeon is located in central-east Ontario on a short
river of the same name, which forms a part of what major
waterway?
 
F2. Bobcaygeon is now part of the City of Kawartha Lakes,
which for both federal and provincial purposes is in an
electoral district with a three-part name. One part of
this name is Kawartha Lakes; give the other two parts,
which refer to neighboring communities.
 
After completing the round, please decode the rot13: Vs lbh fnvq
"Oebagë" sbe nal nafjre, jr arrq gb xabj juvpu fvfgre. Tb onpx
naq fhccyl gur svefg anzr.
 
--
Mark Brader "I don't see much sense in that."
Toronto "No, there isn't. But there was *going* to be
msb@vex.net when I began it. It's just that something
happened to it on the way." --A.A. Milne
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
tool@panix.com (Dan Blum): Nov 22 01:11AM


> 1. Each row in the periodic table is grouped based on its highest
> unexcited electron energy level, similar to an orbit around
> the nucleus. What is the term used for each row?
 
level
 
> 2. Elements in each column in the periodic table share the same
> number of valence electrons, which governs their bonding
> behavior. What is the name for a column?
 
group
 
> 3. The number in the top left of the each element's box indicates
> the number of protons that are found in the element's nucleus.
> What is this called?
 
atomic number
 
> 4. The number just below each element's abbreviation is called
> its atomic mass. What is the simple approximation to estimate
> the atomic mass in whole numbers?
 
number of protons + number of neutrons in most common isotope
 
> Fcrpvsvpnyyl, znal ryrzragf pna rkvfg va zhygvcyr sbezf jvgu
> qvssrerag ahzoref bs arhgebaf. Jung ner gurfr qvssrerag sbezf
> bs na ryrzrag pbyyrpgviryl pnyyrq?
 
isotopes
 
> horizontally in the table, this value generally increases toward
> the top or the right side. What is this chemical characteristic
> known as?
 
reactivity
 
> instead having full electron orbital shells. Because of this
> they are incredibly unreactive, almost always existing in
> monatomic states. What is the modern name for these elements?
 
noble gases
 
 
> conduct electricity well. Collectively they are sometimes
> known as semimetals, but what is the other name for them,
> used in chemistry?
 
transition elements
 
> middle ear. They are known individually as the hammer,
> the anvil, and the stirrup -- but what is the collective
> name for this group of bones? (No, don't try "ear bones".)
 
cochlea
 
> a rival of Michelangelo, and died in 1610 due to an unknown
> disease. Famous works include "Beheading of St. John the
> Baptist", "Bacchus", and "Head of Medusa".
 
Titian; Donatello
 
> pregnancy in 1855. Only three novels were published in her
> lifetime: the two less wildly popular ones were "Shirley"
> and "Villette".
 
George Eliot
 
> and the vessel being overloaded, it is believed over 4,000
> people died in the incident. What national capital city
> was the ferry headed towards?
 
Buenos Aires
 
 
> F1. Bobcaygeon is located in central-east Ontario on a short
> river of the same name, which forms a part of what major
> waterway?
 
St. Lawrence River
 
--
_______________________________________________________________________
Dan Blum tool@panix.com
"I wouldn't have believed it myself if I hadn't just made it up."
Calvin <334152@gmail.com>: Nov 21 08:48PM -0800

On Wednesday, November 22, 2017 at 9:41:33 AM UTC+10, Mark Brader wrote:
 
 
> 1. Each row in the periodic table is grouped based on its highest
> unexcited electron energy level, similar to an orbit around
> the nucleus. What is the term used for each row?
 
Shell
 
> 2. Elements in each column in the periodic table share the same
> number of valence electrons, which governs their bonding
> behavior. What is the name for a column?
 
Group
 
> 3. The number in the top left of the each element's box indicates
> the number of protons that are found in the element's nucleus.
> What is this called?
 
Atomic number
 
> 4. The number just below each element's abbreviation is called
> its atomic mass. What is the simple approximation to estimate
> the atomic mass in whole numbers?
 
Protons + neutrons
 
> Fcrpvsvpnyyl, znal ryrzragf pna rkvfg va zhygvcyr sbezf jvgu
> qvssrerag ahzoref bs arhgebaf. Jung ner gurfr qvssrerag sbezf
> bs na ryrzrag pbyyrpgviryl pnyyrq?
 
Isotopes
 
> horizontally in the table, this value generally increases toward
> the top or the right side. What is this chemical characteristic
> known as?
 
Valency
 
> attracted electron. This also generally increases toward the
> top or the right side of the table. What is the term for this
> amount of energy?
 
Dunno
 
> instead having full electron orbital shells. Because of this
> they are incredibly unreactive, almost always existing in
> monatomic states. What is the modern name for these elements?
 
Noble gasses, inert gasses
 
> form a cation ["CAT-eye-on"]. They are known to react violently
> with water, but form weaker bonds with metallic elements.
> What are these elements known as?
 
Alkali metals
 
> conduct electricity well. Collectively they are sometimes
> known as semimetals, but what is the other name for them,
> used in chemistry?
 
Non-metals?
 

> Prince Rainier III was a 1956 musical comedy based on the
> play "The Philadelphia Story". She starred alongside Bing
> Crosby and Frank Sinatra. What was the movie's title?
 
High Society
 

 
> B2. There are a number of small bones in your wrist, including
> the trapezoid, pisiform, and hamate. What is the collective
> name given to this group of bones?
 
Carpals
 
> a rival of Michelangelo, and died in 1610 due to an unknown
> disease. Famous works include "Beheading of St. John the
> Baptist", "Bacchus", and "Head of Medusa".
 
Titian, Caravaggio

> pregnancy in 1855. Only three novels were published in her
> lifetime: the two less wildly popular ones were "Shirley"
> and "Villette".
 
Shelley, Wolstonecraft
 

> electoral district with a three-part name. One part of
> this name is Kawartha Lakes; give the other two parts,
> which refer to neighboring communities.
 
 
cheers,
calvin
Joshua Kreitzer <gromit82@hotmail.com>: Nov 22 05:03AM

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote in news:XfudnWFDTqI6JInHnZ2dnUU7-
 
> 1. Each row in the periodic table is grouped based on its highest
> unexcited electron energy level, similar to an orbit around
> the nucleus. What is the term used for each row?
 
series; period

> 2. Elements in each column in the periodic table share the same
> number of valence electrons, which governs their bonding
> behavior. What is the name for a column?
 
period; series
 
> 3. The number in the top left of the each element's box indicates
> the number of protons that are found in the element's nucleus.
> What is this called?
 
atomic number
 
> 4. The number just below each element's abbreviation is called
> its atomic mass. What is the simple approximation to estimate
> the atomic mass in whole numbers?
 
number of protons plus number of neutrons
 
> Fcrpvsvpnyyl, znal ryrzragf pna rkvfg va zhygvcyr sbezf jvgu
> qvssrerag ahzoref bs arhgebaf. Jung ner gurfr qvssrerag sbezf
> bs na ryrzrag pbyyrpgviryl pnyyrq?
 
isotopes
 
> instead having full electron orbital shells. Because of this
> they are incredibly unreactive, almost always existing in
> monatomic states. What is the modern name for these elements?
 
noble gases; inert gases

> form a cation ["CAT-eye-on"]. They are known to react violently
> with water, but form weaker bonds with metallic elements.
> What are these elements known as?
 
halides; halogens

> movie career? Her performance earned her a Best Supporting
> Actress Oscar nomination and a Golden Globe. It featured
> Clark Gable and Ava Gardner.
 
"Mogambo"; "The Country Girl"
 
> Prince Rainier III was a 1956 musical comedy based on the
> play "The Philadelphia Story". She starred alongside Bing
> Crosby and Frank Sinatra. What was the movie's title?
 
"High Society"

> pregnancy in 1855. Only three novels were published in her
> lifetime: the two less wildly popular ones were "Shirley"
> and "Villette".
 
Charlotte Bronte; Emily Bronte

> the 9th hit a 2-run walk off home run in the first game of
> the World Series for the Los Angeles Dodgers, who would go
> on to win the Series. Name him.
 
Gibson

 
> After completing the round, please decode the rot13: Vs lbh fnvq
> "Oebagė" sbe nal nafjre, jr arrq gb xabj juvpu fvfgre. Tb onpx
> naq fhccyl gur svefg anzr.
 
qnea vg... bx, qbar
 
--
Joshua Kreitzer
gromit82@hotmail.com
Pete Gayde <pagrsg@wowway.com>: Nov 22 06:41AM

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote in news:XfudnWFDTqI6JInHnZ2dnUU7-
 
> 3. The number in the top left of the each element's box indicates
> the number of protons that are found in the element's nucleus.
> What is this called?
 
Atomic number
 
 
> 4. The number just below each element's abbreviation is called
> its atomic mass. What is the simple approximation to estimate
> the atomic mass in whole numbers?
 
Protons plus electrons
 
> Fcrpvsvpnyyl, znal ryrzragf pna rkvfg va zhygvcyr sbezf jvgu
> qvssrerag ahzoref bs arhgebaf. Jung ner gurfr qvssrerag sbezf
> bs na ryrzrag pbyyrpgviryl pnyyrq?
 
Isotopes
 
> instead having full electron orbital shells. Because of this
> they are incredibly unreactive, almost always existing in
> monatomic states. What is the modern name for these elements?
 
Noble gases
 
> Prince Rainier III was a 1956 musical comedy based on the
> play "The Philadelphia Story". She starred alongside Bing
> Crosby and Frank Sinatra. What was the movie's title?
 
Holiday Inn
 
> middle ear. They are known individually as the hammer,
> the anvil, and the stirrup -- but what is the collective
> name for this group of bones? (No, don't try "ear bones".)
 
Stapes
 
> a rival of Michelangelo, and died in 1610 due to an unknown
> disease. Famous works include "Beheading of St. John the
> Baptist", "Bacchus", and "Head of Medusa".
 
Botticelli
 
> pregnancy in 1855. Only three novels were published in her
> lifetime: the two less wildly popular ones were "Shirley"
> and "Villette".
 
Mary Shelley
 
> the 9th hit a 2-run walk off home run in the first game of
> the World Series for the Los Angeles Dodgers, who would go
> on to win the Series. Name him.
 
Kirk Gibson
 
> crushed during play in 1985. In preference to reconstructive
> surgery that would put him out for a whole season, he decided
> to have the finder amputated so he could play. Who was he?
 
Lott
 
Calvin <334152@gmail.com>: Nov 21 03:09PM -0800

On Monday, November 13, 2017 at 10:02:12 AM UTC+10, Calvin wrote:
> Welcome to RQ #274.
 
Well this one didn't really capture the public's imagination.
 
> 1 Joel was born in 1949 in which US state?
 
New York
 
> 2 In his late teens and early twenties Joel had a moderately successful career in which sport?
 
Boxing
 
> 3 The story is apocryphal, but once he had decided on a career in music rather that attending an Ivy league university, Joel supposedly said "To hell with it. If I'm not going to ___ University, I'm going to ___ Records". Which one word replaces both blanks?
 
Columbia
 
> 4 What was the name of the short-lived heavy metal band Joel and Jon Small formed in 1969?
 
Attila
 
> 5 Released in 1971, what was the title of Joel's first solo album, featuring the singles "She's Got a Way" and "Everybody Loves You Now"?
 
Cold Spring Harbor

> 6 These lyrics are from which 1976 single, sharing its name with the four redacted words? "There's a place in the world for the w x y z / With his working class ties and his radical plans / He refuses to bend, he refuses to crawl / and he's always at home with his back to the wall. He's proud of the scars and the battles he's lost / He struggles and bleeds as he hangs on the cross / And he likes to be known as w x y z." HINT: w is "the".
 
The Angry Young Man
 
> 7 These lyrics are from which 1977 song, one of his best known despite never being released as a single? "A bottle of red, a bottle of white / It all depends on your appetite / I'll meet you any time you want / In our ...""
 
Italian Restaurant
 
> 8 Which 1977 album was his critical and commercial breakthrough, spent six weeks at #2 on the U.S. album charts, and remains his best-selling (non-compilation) album?
 
The Stranger
 
> 9 Which 1978 album featuring the singles "My Life", "Big Shot" and "Honesty" became, in 1982, the first album to be commercially released on compact disc?
 
52nd Street
 
> 10 Which former wife designed the cover for his 1993 album "River of Dreams"?
 
Christie Brinkley
 
> 11 As of current date how many times has Joel been married?
 
4
 
> 12 What is the given name of his eldest daughter, shared with a song on his 1989 album "Storm Front"?
 
Alexa [Rae]

 
Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q5 Q6 Q7 Q8 Q9 Q10 Q11 Q12 TOTAL TB RQ274
1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 4 8 Marc Dashevsky
0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 5 Dan Tilque
0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 6 Mark Brader
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 Erland S
0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 4 Dan Blum
- - - - - - - - - - - - --- ----------
1 1 4 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 1 0 10 20%
 
Marc is the clear winner- congratulations sir. RQ275 is all yours.
 
cheers,
calvin
Marc Dashevsky <usenet@MarcDashevsky.com>: Nov 21 05:15PM -0600

Thanks, Calvin. I got #2 wrong but a score of 3 still has me winning.
If there are other score changes that affect the outcome, speak up.
Otherwise I'll post a quiz on Friday.
 
 
 
In article <6910a5dc-04e2-443e-9d71-7dc88a7ceaa1@googlegroups.com>, 334152@gmail.com says...
 
--
Replace "usenet" with "marc" in the e-mail address.
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Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Digest for rec.games.trivia@googlegroups.com - 3 updates in 3 topics

Calvin <334152@gmail.com>: Nov 20 03:43PM -0800

On Monday, November 20, 2017 at 2:20:26 PM UTC+10, Mark Brader wrote:
> > I just happened to catch bits of the latter on TV last night.
> > [Finney's] French accent (as Poirot) was terrible.
 
> Ah, but Poirot isn't French!
 
I never claimed he was.
 
cheers,
calvin
Dan Tilque <dtilque@frontier.com>: Nov 20 11:47AM -0800

Mark Brader wrote:
>> Forget to log into email for a couple days and this entire quiz passes
>> me by.
 
> Well, if you're reading Usenet by email...
 
I read Usenet with my email reader. But I'm lazy and still use my old
computer to do so. Just haven't gotten around to moving it to my new
computer.
 
--
Dan Tilque
gwowen@gmail.com: Nov 20 03:57AM -0800

On Wednesday, November 15, 2017 at 10:48:41 PM UTC, Calvin wrote:
> 1 In mathematics, what is the value of the imaginary number "i"?
 
log(-1) / pi
 
> 2  In which city was the ill-fated Titanic built?
 
Belfast
 
> 3 Which foodstuff is most commonly associated with a zester?
 
Lemon
 
> 4 Which actress' first and last names together are an anagram of "Germany"? [BOTH names please]
 
Meg Ryan
 
> 5 Which composer's 6th Symphony is known as the 'Pathétique'?
 
Tchaikovsky
 
> 6 Which royal is the current Earl of Wessex?
 
Prince Edward
 
> 7 Which five-letter word completes the title of a 1969 autobiography by Maya Angelou: "I Know Why The Caged Bird ..."?
 
Sings
 
> 8 Which mountain in Greece is the legendary home of the Ancient gods?
 
Olympus
 
> 9 Which 1999 psychological horror film by Daniel Myrick and Eduardo Sánchez gained box office receipts worth some 4,000 times its budget?
 
The Blair Witch Project
 
> 10 In classical music a piano trio is a chamber ensemble consisting of a piano, a violin and which other musical instrument?
 
Cello
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Monday, November 20, 2017

Digest for rec.games.trivia@googlegroups.com - 6 updates in 3 topics

Calvin <334152@gmail.com>: Nov 19 05:08PM -0800

On Saturday, November 18, 2017 at 4:40:21 PM UTC+10, Mark Brader wrote:
 
> for such films as "Jurassic Park" and "Superman" as well as
> various "Star Wars", Indiana Jones, and Harry Potter movies?
> Answer within 2 nominations.
 
28, 33
 
> and the leading acting loser with 17 -- you may remember our
> recent round on some of the actresses who beat her. Name any
> of the 3 movies that she did win for.
 
Silkwood
 
 
 
> 3. Peter O'Toole: The all-time loser, with 8 nominations and no
> wins between 1962 and 2006 inclusive. (All dates given are
> the dates of the movies' release, not the Oscar ceremonies.)
 
Lawrence of Arabia
 
> 4. Deborah Kerr ["Car"], who went 0-for-6 from 1949 to 1960.
 
The King and I
 
> 5. Ed Harris: 4 nominations, no wins from 1995 to 2002.
 
Apollo 13
 
> 6. Glenn Close: 0-for-6 like Deborah Kerr, from 1982 to 2011.
 
The Natural, Fatal Attraction
 
> 7. Richard Burton: right behind his buddy Peter O'Toole with
> 7 losses, from 1952 to 1977.
 
A Man for All Seasons, The Lion in Winter
 
> 8. Albert Finney: 5 nominations from 1963 to 2000.
 
Annie, Murder on the Orient Express
I just happened to catch bits of the latter on TV last night. His French accent (as Poirot) was terrible.
 
> 9. Amy Adams: 5 nominations from 2005 to 2013.
 
Charlie Wilson's War
 
> nominations for writing, directing, and as producer of the
> Best Picture, and he did win one of those awards; but we're
> only asking about his acting nominations, from 1967 to 1991.
 
Ishtar, Dick Tracey
 

> * Game 5, Round 8 - Canadiana - The Tragically Hip
 
Pass.
 
cheers,
calvin
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Nov 19 10:20PM -0600

"Calvin":
> Annie, Murder on the Orient Express
> I just happened to catch bits of the latter on TV last night.
> [Finney's] French accent (as Poirot) was terrible.
 
Ah, but Poirot isn't French! How are you at evaluating *Belgian* accents?
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "Dystypsia."
msb@vex.net | --Michael Wares gives the reason for a typo
"Peter Smyth" <smythp@gmail.com>: Nov 12 12:11PM

Mark Brader wrote:
 
> questions deal with that era.
 
> 1. In 1884-5 a conference, essentially setting out new "rules of
> acquisition" in Africa, was held in which European capital?
Paris
> 2. In 1900 there were only three independent nations in Africa.
> Two of these were Abyssinia (now Ethiopia) and Morocco.
> Name the third.
Orange Free State
> 3. In 1884 a large tract of land in central Africa was granted
> directly to a European monarch rather than a nation. Who was
> this monarch?
King Leopold of Belgium
> 4. Which nation attempted a conquest of Abyssinia in 1896, but
> suffered defeat at the battle of Adowa?
Italy
> lost them after World War I. German West Africa consisted of
> the two colonies which today are the countries of Cameroon and
> what other nation?
Namibia
> European countries that were each attempting to link different
> areas they had colonized. A war was narrowly averted. Which two
> countries are we talking about?
UK & France
> the Belgian Congo acquired two territories from the former
> German East Africa colony. They both became independent
> countries in 1962. What are they called now? Both names needed.
Rwanda and Burundi
> 8. The French colonial empire in Africa was extensive. French
> Equatorial Africa consisted of four modern-day countries: Chad,
> Gabon, Republic of Congo, and what other country?
Central African Republic
> Angola and Mozambique. A smaller group of islands west of the
> African continent were in Portuguese hands from 1462 to 1975,
> when they became independent. Name this island group.
Sao Tome and Principe
> British and Dutch colonists, a treaty was signed in 1868
> creating a British protectorate under the name Basutoland.
> What is the present-day name of Basutoland?
Lesotho, Swaziland
> as indicated).
 
> 1. The Nilotic people are spread over four countries and speak a
> variety of languages, such as Maasai, Dinka, and Maa.
G, H
> 2. The Dayak are the native people living principally in the
> interior of this large island. Their language is categorized
> as part of the Austronesian language family.
O, P
> 3. The Hmong form a minority in this region, where they settled
> in the 18th century after a southward migration.
S
> 4. The Bororo, a small group of under 2,000, are spread out over
> eight villages and were closely studied by anthropologist Claude
> Lévi-Strauss during his expedition to Mato Grosso.
L, M
> 5. The Adyghe is the native name of the Circassians. The diaspora
> of the Circassians has spread them out in the Middle East,
> but this region is their ancestral land.
T, U
> 6. The Nenets used to be called "Samoyeds" by their more populous
> neighbors, who would ultimately absorb them. That term, which
> meant "self-eater", was derogatory and is no longer in use.
V, W
> 7. The Sanhaja Berbers used to be one of the largest Berber tribal
> confederations, but now live mostly in the Middle Atlas
> mountains.
J, K
> 8. The Tigrinya speak an Ethiopean Semitic language and make up the
> majority of their country in the southern and central Red
> Sea area.
F
> 9. The Amuzgos got their name from a powerful neighbouring group,
> the Aztecs, and are known for their textiles handwoven on
> backstrap looms with complicated two-dimensional designs.
B, A
> 10. The Mordvins live in an autonomous region of Mordovia, and
> their language is part of the Uralic language family, so named
> after the nearby Urals.
T, U
 
Peter Smyth
Joshua Kreitzer <gromit82@hotmail.com>: Nov 12 03:18PM

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote in news:ZKWdnWNNrvuLdJrHnZ2dnUU7-
> questions deal with that era.
 
> 1. In 1884-5 a conference, essentially setting out new "rules of
> acquisition" in Africa, was held in which European capital?
 
Berlin; Paris

> 2. In 1900 there were only three independent nations in Africa.
> Two of these were Abyssinia (now Ethiopia) and Morocco.
> Name the third.
 
Liberia
 
> 3. In 1884 a large tract of land in central Africa was granted
> directly to a European monarch rather than a nation. Who was
> this monarch?
 
Leopold II of Belgium; Leopold I of Belgium

> 4. Which nation attempted a conquest of Abyssinia in 1896, but
> suffered defeat at the battle of Adowa?
 
Italy
 
> lost them after World War I. German West Africa consisted of
> the two colonies which today are the countries of Cameroon and
> what other nation?
 
Gabon
 
> European countries that were each attempting to link different
> areas they had colonized. A war was narrowly averted. Which two
> countries are we talking about?
 
UK and France

> the Belgian Congo acquired two territories from the former
> German East Africa colony. They both became independent
> countries in 1962. What are they called now? Both names needed.
 
Rwanda, Burundi
 
> 8. The French colonial empire in Africa was extensive. French
> Equatorial Africa consisted of four modern-day countries: Chad,
> Gabon, Republic of Congo, and what other country?
 
Central African Republic
 
> Angola and Mozambique. A smaller group of islands west of the
> African continent were in Portuguese hands from 1462 to 1975,
> when they became independent. Name this island group.
 
Cabo Verde; Sao Tome and Principe
 
> British and Dutch colonists, a treaty was signed in 1868
> creating a British protectorate under the name Basutoland.
> What is the present-day name of Basutoland?
 
Lesotho

> as indicated).
 
> 1. The Nilotic people are spread over four countries and speak a
> variety of languages, such as Maasai, Dinka, and Maa.
 
H; G
 
> 2. The Dayak are the native people living principally in the
> interior of this large island. Their language is categorized
> as part of the Austronesian language family.
 
O

> 3. The Hmong form a minority in this region, where they settled
> in the 18th century after a southward migration.
 
S
 
> 4. The Bororo, a small group of under 2,000, are spread out over
> eight villages and were closely studied by anthropologist Claude
> Lévi-Strauss during his expedition to Mato Grosso.
 
L
 
> 5. The Adyghe is the native name of the Circassians. The diaspora
> of the Circassians has spread them out in the Middle East,
> but this region is their ancestral land.
 
T; U
 
> 6. The Nenets used to be called "Samoyeds" by their more populous
> neighbors, who would ultimately absorb them. That term, which
> meant "self-eater", was derogatory and is no longer in use.
 
W

> 7. The Sanhaja Berbers used to be one of the largest Berber tribal
> confederations, but now live mostly in the Middle Atlas
> mountains.
 
K; J
 
> 8. The Tigrinya speak an Ethiopean Semitic language and make up the
> majority of their country in the southern and central Red
> Sea area.
 
F
 
> 9. The Amuzgos got their name from a powerful neighbouring group,
> the Aztecs, and are known for their textiles handwoven on
> backstrap looms with complicated two-dimensional designs.
 
B; C
 
> 10. The Mordvins live in an autonomous region of Mordovia, and
> their language is part of the Uralic language family, so named
> after the nearby Urals.
 
U; V
 
--
Joshua Kreitzer
gromit82@hotmail.com
Erland Sommarskog <esquel@sommarskog.se>: Nov 12 11:31AM +0100

> * Game 5, Round 2 - History - The Scramble for Africa
 
> 1. In 1884-5 a conference, essentially setting out new "rules of
> acquisition" in Africa, was held in which European capital?
 
London

> 2. In 1900 there were only three independent nations in Africa.
> Two of these were Abyssinia (now Ethiopia) and Morocco.
> Name the third.
 
Liberia

> 3. In 1884 a large tract of land in central Africa was granted
> directly to a European monarch rather than a nation. Who was
> this monarch?
 
King Leopold of Belgium

> 4. Which nation attempted a conquest of Abyssinia in 1896, but
> suffered defeat at the battle of Adowa?
 
Italy

> lost them after World War I. German West Africa consisted of
> the two colonies which today are the countries of Cameroon and
> what other nation?
 
Namibia

> European countries that were each attempting to link different
> areas they had colonized. A war was narrowly averted. Which two
> countries are we talking about?
 
UK and France
 
> the Belgian Congo acquired two territories from the former
> German East Africa colony. They both became independent
> countries in 1962. What are they called now? Both names needed.
 
Rwanda and Burundi

> 8. The French colonial empire in Africa was extensive. French
> Equatorial Africa consisted of four modern-day countries: Chad,
> Gabon, Republic of Congo, and what other country?
 
Mali
 
> Angola and Mozambique. A smaller group of islands west of the
> African continent were in Portuguese hands from 1462 to 1975,
> when they became independent. Name this island group.
 
Cabo Verde

> British and Dutch colonists, a treaty was signed in 1868
> creating a British protectorate under the name Basutoland.
> What is the present-day name of Basutoland?
 
Botswana

> * Game 5, Round 3 - Geography - Indigenous Groups
 
> 1. The Nilotic people are spread over four countries and speak a
> variety of languages, such as Maasai, Dinka, and Maa.
 
I

> 2. The Dayak are the native people living principally in the
> interior of this large island. Their language is categorized
> as part of the Austronesian language family.
 
O

> 3. The Hmong form a minority in this region, where they settled
> in the 18th century after a southward migration.
 
Y

> 4. The Bororo, a small group of under 2,000, are spread out over
> eight villages and were closely studied by anthropologist Claude
> Lévi-Strauss during his expedition to Mato Grosso.
 
M

> 5. The Adyghe is the native name of the Circassians. The diaspora
> of the Circassians has spread them out in the Middle East,
> but this region is their ancestral land.
 
T

> 6. The Nenets used to be called "Samoyeds" by their more populous
> neighbors, who would ultimately absorb them. That term, which
> meant "self-eater", was derogatory and is no longer in use.
 
V

> 7. The Sanhaja Berbers used to be one of the largest Berber tribal
> confederations, but now live mostly in the Middle Atlas
> mountains.
 
J

> 8. The Tigrinya speak an Ethiopean Semitic language and make up the
> majority of their country in the southern and central Red
> Sea area.
 
F

> 9. The Amuzgos got their name from a powerful neighbouring group,
> the Aztecs, and are known for their textiles handwoven on
> backstrap looms with complicated two-dimensional designs.
 
B

> 10. The Mordvins live in an autonomous region of Mordovia, and
> their language is part of the Uralic language family, so named
> after the nearby Urals.
 
U

 
 
 
--
Erland Sommarskog, Stockholm, esquel@sommarskog.se
Pete Gayde <pagrsg@wowway.com>: Nov 12 04:07AM

Calvin <334152@gmail.com> wrote in
 
> 1 Which author's novels include 'The Wings of the Dove' (1902)
> and 'The Ambassadors (1903)'?
> 2 Stanislaus is the patron saint of which European country?
 
Poland
 
> 3 Which body of water separates Taiwan from the Philippines?
 
South China Sea
 
> 4 By what name was St Petersburg known from 1924 to 1991?
 
Leningrad
 
> 5 Among left-handers, who has won the most Grand
> Slam singles men's tennis titles?
 
Laver
 
> 6 Name any one of the Water
> signs according to Western astrology.
 
Pisces
 
> 7 The 1998 Disney film 'The
> Prince of Egypt' centres on the life of which biblical figure?
 
Moses
 
> 8 What connects Pioneer, Viking and Cassini?
 
NASA Satellites
 
> 9 The 1915 sinking of
> which British ocean liner hastened the United States' entry into
> World War One?
 
Lusitania
 
> 10 Lucky the Leprechaun is the mascot of which NBA team?
 
Boston Celtics
 
 
> cheers,
> calvin
 
Pete Gayde
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Sunday, November 19, 2017

Digest for rec.games.trivia@googlegroups.com - 3 updates in 3 topics

"Chris F.A. Johnson" <cfajohnson@cfaj.ca>: Nov 18 06:16PM -0500

On 2017-11-15, Calvin wrote:
 
> 1 In mathematics, what is the value of the imaginary number "i"?
 
Square root of -1
 
> 2 ??In which city was the ill-fated Titanic built?
 
Liverpool
 
> 3 Which foodstuff is most commonly associated with a zester?
 
Orange or other citrus fruit
 
> 4 Which actress' first and last names together are an anagram of "Germany"? [BOTH names please]
 
Mary Eng
 
> 5 Which composer's 6th Symphony is known as the 'Path??tique'?
 
Tchaikovsky
 
> 6 Which royal is the current Earl of Wessex?
 
Prince Harry
 
> 7 Which five-letter word completes the title of a 1969 autobiography by Maya Angelou: ???I Know Why The Caged Bird ...????
 
Sings
 
> 8 Which mountain in Greece is the legendary home of the Ancient gods?
 
Olympus
 
> 9 Which 1999 psychological horror film by Daniel Myrick and Eduardo S??nchez gained box office receipts worth some 4,000 times its budget?
 
 
> 10 In classical music a piano trio is a chamber ensemble consisting of a piano, a violin and which other musical instrument?
 
Cello
 
--
Chris F.A. Johnson
tool@panix.com (Dan Blum): Nov 18 03:03PM

> for such films as "Jurassic Park" and "Superman" as well as
> various "Star Wars", Indiana Jones, and Harry Potter movies?
> Answer within 2 nominations.
 
30; 40
 
> and the leading acting loser with 17 -- you may remember our
> recent round on some of the actresses who beat her. Name any
> of the 3 movies that she did win for.
 
Sophie's Choice
 
> 3. Peter O'Toole: The all-time loser, with 8 nominations and no
> wins between 1962 and 2006 inclusive. (All dates given are
> the dates of the movies' release, not the Oscar ceremonies.)
 
My Favorite Year
 
> 5. Ed Harris: 4 nominations, no wins from 1995 to 2002.
 
Apollo 13
 
> 6. Glenn Close: 0-for-6 like Deborah Kerr, from 1982 to 2011.
 
Fatal Attraction
 
> 7. Richard Burton: right behind his buddy Peter O'Toole with
> 7 losses, from 1952 to 1977.
 
The Lion in Winter
 
> 8. Albert Finney: 5 nominations from 1963 to 2000.
 
Tom Jones
 
> 9. Amy Adams: 5 nominations from 2005 to 2013.
 
Junebug
 
> nominations for writing, directing, and as producer of the
> Best Picture, and he did win one of those awards; but we're
> only asking about his acting nominations, from 1967 to 1991.
 
Reds
 
> * Game 5, Round 8 - Canadiana - The Tragically Hip
 
> 5. Within 1, how many Hip albums have reached #1 in Canada?
 
6; 9
 
> 6. Within 1, how many Junos has the band won (not counting
> individual wins by Downie himself)?
 
4; 8
 
--
_______________________________________________________________________
Dan Blum tool@panix.com
"I wouldn't have believed it myself if I hadn't just made it up."
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Nov 18 05:35AM -0600

Dan Tilque:
> Forget to log into email for a couple days and this entire quiz passes
> me by.
 
Well, if you're reading Usenet by email...
 
If Dan's answers had been posted on time, he would have scored
4 points on Round 4 and 16 on Round 6.
--
Mark Brader "This is... a film... almost without explosions."
Toronto, msb@vex.net --Mark Leeper
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