Sunday, January 21, 2018

Digest for rec.games.trivia@googlegroups.com - 7 updates in 2 topics

Erland Sommarskog <esquel@sommarskog.se>: Jan 20 03:26PM +0100

>> 6. (Decoy) Self-portrait (1972).
 
> Pablo Picasso. 4 for Pete and Joshua.
 
Not that I want to be mean with Pete and Joshua, but if it is a decoy,
how come they got points?
tool@panix.com (Dan Blum): Jan 20 03:39PM


> 1. American actor.
 
George Clooney
 
> 2. British actor.
 
Sean Connery
 
> 3. British actress.
 
Judi Dench
 
> 8. American athlete.
 
Williams
 
> 9. American TV personality.
 
Jimmy Kimmel
 
> 11. American actor.
 
Leonardo Dicaprio
 
> 15. British actress.
 
Helen Mirren
 
> most maligned, most ironically named of all apple varieties
> in the US. It now has thick skin, a one-note sweet flavor,
> and an often crumbly texture.
 
Red Delicious
 
> 4. If you're into tartness, this bitter old bird is your go-to.
> Its crisp, juicy flesh, however, does sweeten with storage.
 
Granny Smith
 
> 7. Created in Japan this apple is a cross between <answer 1> and
> the Ralls Genet. It is described as dense, crisp and one of
> the sweetest of all varieties.
 
Fuji
 
--
_______________________________________________________________________
Dan Blum tool@panix.com
"I wouldn't have believed it myself if I hadn't just made it up."
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Jan 20 01:36PM -0600

Mark Brader:
>>> 6. (Decoy) Self-portrait (1972).
>> Pablo Picasso. 4 for Pete and Joshua.
 
Erland Sommarskog:
> Not that I want to be mean with Pete and Joshua, but if it is a decoy,
> how come they got points?
 
My error, of course. Scores, if there are now no errors:
 
GAME 10 ROUNDS-> 2 3 4 3 TOTALS
TOPICS-> His Can Art Spo
Stephen Perry 40 40 -- -- 80
Joshua Kreitzer 36 12 20 10 78
Pete Gayde 32 10 12 19 73
Dan Blum 32 17 6 0 55
Dan Tilque 36 4 -- -- 40
"Calvin" 25 0 -- -- 25
Marc Dashevsky 16 0 8 0 24
Erland Sommarskog 16 0 4 0 20
Peter Smyth 19 0 -- -- 19
Jason Kreitzer 8 4 -- -- 12
 
--
Mark Brader | "The speed of sound is considerably less than the
Toronto | speed of light -- that is why some people appear bright
msb@vex.net | until you hear them talk."
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
Pete Gayde <pagrsg@wowway.com>: Jan 21 01:31AM

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote in news:p--dnf4ubsxMi_7HnZ2dnUU7-
> and nationality, or less information for the decoys. In all cases
> the surname will suffice.
 
> 1. American actor.
 
George Clooney
 
> 2. British actor.
 
Sean Connery
 
> 3. British actress.
 
Maggie Smith
 
> 4. British musician.
 
Keith Richards
 
> 5. (Decoy) Actress.
 
Faye Dunaway
 
> 6. British musician.
 
Eric Clapton
 
> 7. British comedian and activist.
 
Eddy Izzard
 
> 8. American athlete.
 
LeBron James
 
> 9. American TV personality.
 
Stephen Colbert
 
> 10. (Decoy) Leading woman in her field.
> 11. American actor.
 
Leonardo DiCaprio
 
> 12. (Decoy) Politician.
 
Putin
 
> 13. (Decoy) Actress.
 
Elizabeth Taylor
 
> 14. (Decoy) Politician.
 
Barack Obama
 
> 15. British actress.
 
Helen Mirren
 
> most maligned, most ironically named of all apple varieties
> in the US. It now has thick skin, a one-note sweet flavor,
> and an often crumbly texture.
 
Red Delicious
 
 
> 2. With a soft skin and softer flesh, this common apple strikes
> a level balance between sweet and acidic.
 
MacIntosh
 
 
> 3. Considered an all-purpose apple, it can commonly be bought in
> bulk for low prices and is described as mild and sweet, with
> a juicy flesh.
 
Golden Delicious
 
 
> 4. If you're into tartness, this bitter old bird is your go-to.
> Its crisp, juicy flesh, however, does sweeten with storage.
 
Granny Smith
 
> apple keeps things simple with a light overall flavor profile
> that's more sweet than tart. It's also juicy and moderately
> crunchy.
 
Gala
 
> between <answers 1 and 2>, despite its thin skin. It is crisp
> and retains both the sweetness and tartness of its two parent
> apples.
 
MacIntosh
 
 
> 7. Created in Japan this apple is a cross between <answer 1> and
> the Ralls Genet. It is described as dense, crisp and one of
> the sweetest of all varieties.
 
Fuji
 
 
> 8. This New Zealand breed has been gaining in popularity in North
> America. Its skin is thin, concealing a crisp and juicy flesh
> that's fragrant and fairly sweet.
 
Gala
 
 
> 9. This apple has a creamy white interior and both sweet-and-tart
> flavors. It is relatively soft and functions as an all-purpose
> apple, which means you can bake it, cook it, or eat it raw.
 
Honeycrisp
 
 
> 10. This apple also originates from New Zealand and produces a firm,
> crisp bite and offers a pleasing balance between sweet and tart.
> These apples a good for baking as well as eating raw.
 
Gala
 
 
Pete Gayde
Joshua Kreitzer <gromit82@hotmail.com>: Jan 21 01:49AM

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote in news:p--dnf4ubsxMi_7HnZ2dnUU7-
> and nationality, or less information for the decoys. In all cases
> the surname will suffice.
 
> 13. (Decoy) Actress.
 
Elizabeth Taylor
 
> most maligned, most ironically named of all apple varieties
> in the US. It now has thick skin, a one-note sweet flavor,
> and an often crumbly texture.
 
Red Delicious
 
> 4. If you're into tartness, this bitter old bird is your go-to.
> Its crisp, juicy flesh, however, does sweeten with storage.
 
Granny Smith
 
> 7. Created in Japan this apple is a cross between <answer 1> and
> the Ralls Genet. It is described as dense, crisp and one of
> the sweetest of all varieties.
 
Fuji
 
--
Joshua Kreitzer
gromit82@hotmail.com
Dan Tilque <dtilque@frontier.com>: Jan 21 02:09AM -0800

Mark Brader wrote:
> most maligned, most ironically named of all apple varieties
> in the US. It now has thick skin, a one-note sweet flavor,
> and an often crumbly texture.
 
red delicious
 
 
> 3. Considered an all-purpose apple, it can commonly be bought in
> bulk for low prices and is described as mild and sweet, with
> a juicy flesh.
 
golden delicious
 
 
> 4. If you're into tartness, this bitter old bird is your go-to.
> Its crisp, juicy flesh, however, does sweeten with storage.
 
granny smith
 
 
> 7. Created in Japan this apple is a cross between <answer 1> and
> the Ralls Genet. It is described as dense, crisp and one of
> the sweetest of all varieties.
 
Fuji
 
 
--
Dan Tilque
swp <stephen.w.perry@gmail.com>: Jan 20 08:17AM -0800

On Wednesday, January 17, 2018 at 2:51:04 PM UTC-5, Gareth Owen wrote:
> Sorry about the delay - new job taking more time than I expected.
 
> Usual RQ rules apply, Closing 00:01 AM GMT, Sunday 21st Jan.
 
I saw many others answers before posting this.
 
> gymnastics competition?
 
> 6. Which Hollywood star also made breakthroughs in the field of radio
> communications, including frequency hopping and spread spectrum?
 
hedy lamarr
 
> owner?
 
> Tie break: The highest and lowest points of the continental United
> States are both in Californa. How far apart are they?
 
88 miles as the crow flies. about 135 on various roads.
 
swp
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Saturday, January 20, 2018

Digest for rec.games.trivia@googlegroups.com - 5 updates in 2 topics

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Jan 20 04:11AM -0600

Mark Brader:
> Identify those artists as well if you like for fun, but for
> no points.
 
> 1. "La Gerbe" (1953).
 
Henri Matisse. 4 for Joshua.
 
> 2. "A Bar at the Folies Bergère" (1882).
 
Edouard Manet. 4 for Marc.
 
> 3. "Christ Carrying the Cross" (1535).
 
Hieronymus Bosch.
 
> 4. "Victory Boogie Woogie" (1944).
 
Piet Mondriaan. 4 for Dan, Pete, and Joshua.
 
> 5. Untitled (1940).
 
Paul Klee.
 
> 6. (Decoy) Self-portrait (1972).
 
Pablo Picasso. 4 for Pete and Joshua.
 
> 7. (Decoy) "The Gardener Vallier" (1906).
 
Paul Cézanne.
 
> 8. (Decoy) "The Watermelons" (1957).
 
Diego Rivera.
 
> 9. "Viva la Vida Watermelons" (1954).
 
Frida Kahlo -- Rivera's wife.
 
> 10. "The Beyond" (1972).
 
Georgia O'Keefe.
 
> 11. "The Swallow's Tail" (1983).
 
Salvador Dalí. 4 for Pete and Joshua.
 
> 12. "Simeon with the Christ Child in the Temple" (1669).
 
Rembrandt Van Rijn. 4 for Erland, Pete, and Joshua.
 
> 13. "Two Dancers Resting" (1896).
 
Edgar Degas. 4 for Marc and Joshua. 2 for Dan.
 
 
 
> 1. Each year the Hall of Fame honors a newspaper writer and a
> broadcaster for their career contributions. The broadcast
> award is named for which pioneer hockey broadcaster?
 
Foster Hewitt. 4 for Pete.
 
> 2. Who resigned his Hockey Hall of Fame membership in 1998 after
> pleading guilty to criminal charges?
 
Alan Eagleson. 4 for Joshua.
 
> In fact Toronto was not the first choice for the site.
> Which eastern Ontario city originally go[t] the nod, but then
> couldn't get the project done?
 
Kingston.
 
> 8-time world champion and 2-time Olympic gold medalist.
> Name this Quebec native, who becomes the 5th woman player in
> the Hall of Fame
 
Danielle Goyette.
 
> 5. Joining the Hall this year as a builder is Jeremy Jacobs,
> the owner since 1975 of which "Original Six" NHL team?
 
Boston Bruins. 4 for Pete. 3 for Joshua.
 
> 6. Four NHL players were admitted this year: Dave Andreychuk,
> Paul Kariya, Mark Recchi, and Temmu Selanne. Which one of them
> played for the Toronto Maple Leafs?
 
Dave Andreychuk. 3 for Pete and Joshua.
 
 
> 7. When Dave Andreychuk won the Stanley Cup in 2004, he tied
> the record of playing 22 seasons before winning his first title.
> For which team was Andreychuk the captain that year?
 
Tampa Bay Lightning. (The record was set by Ray Bourque.)
 
> 8. Paul Kariya played in 2 Olympics for Canada and for 4 NHL teams
> over 15 seasons. Name *any one* of those 4 NHL teams.
 
Mighty Ducks of Anaheim (accepting "Ducks"), Colorado Avalanche
("Avalanche" was required), Nashville Predators, St. Louis Blues.
4 for Pete.
 
> 9. Mark Recchi played 22 seasons with 7 teams. Name any of the
> 3 teams Recchi won a Stanley Cup with.
 
Pittsburgh Penguins, Carolina Hurricanes, Boston Bruins. (He also
played for the Philadelphia Flyers, Montreal Canadiens, Atlanta
Thrashers, and Tampa Bay Lightning).
 
> 10. Teemu Selanne scored 684 NHL goals and helped Anaheim win the
> Stanley Cup in 2007. The "Finnish Flash" still holds the record
> of 76 goals by a rookie, set in 1992-93 with which Canadian team?
 
Winnipeg Jets. 4 for Pete.
 
 
Scores, if there are no errors:
 
GAME 10 ROUNDS-> 2 3 4 6 TOTALS
TOPICS-> His Can Art Spo
Joshua Kreitzer 36 12 24 10 82
Stephen Perry 40 40 -- -- 80
Pete Gayde 32 10 16 19 77
Dan Blum 32 17 6 0 55
Dan Tilque 36 4 -- -- 40
"Calvin" 25 0 -- -- 25
Marc Dashevsky 16 0 8 0 24
Erland Sommarskog 16 0 4 0 20
Peter Smyth 19 0 -- -- 19
Jason Kreitzer 8 4 -- -- 12
 
--
Mark Brader | "I have on occasion manufactured technical terms that
Toronto | have made it into common use in the literature.
msb@vex.net | But not many, and I'm licensed." --John Lawler
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Jan 20 04:13AM -0600

These questions were written to be asked in Toronto on 2017-11-27,
and should be interpreted accordingly.
 
On each question you may give up to two answers, but if you give
both a right answer and a wrong answer, there is a small penalty.
Please post all your answers to the newsgroup in a single followup,
based only on your own knowledge. (In your answer posting, quote
the questions and place your answer below each one.) I will reveal
the correct answers in about 3 days.
 
All questions were written by members of Smith & Guessin' and are
used here by permission, but have been reformatted and may have
been retyped and/or edited by me. For further information see
my 2017-09-25 companion posting on "Questions from the Canadian
Inquisition (QFTCI*)".
 
 
* Game 10, Round 7 - Entertainment - When They were Young
 
Again I have rearranged the questions in order of the handout:
 
http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/g10r7/young.pdf
 
There were 5 decoys, which are interspersed with the others.
Answer the decoys if you like for fun, but for no points.
 
In each case you simply provide the name of the famous person
shown here when they were young. We'll give you their profession
and nationality, or less information for the decoys. In all cases
the surname will suffice.
 
1. American actor.
2. British actor.
3. British actress.
4. British musician.
5. (Decoy) Actress.
6. British musician.
7. British comedian and activist.
8. American athlete.
9. American TV personality.
10. (Decoy) Leading woman in her field.
11. American actor.
12. (Decoy) Politician.
13. (Decoy) Actress.
14. (Decoy) Politician.
15. British actress.
 
 
* Game 10, Round 8 - Miscellanous - Apples
 
And once again I have rearranged the questions in order of the
handout:
 
http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/g10r8/apples.pdf
 
This time there were no decoys. In each case you simply name the
variety of apple.
 
1. Originally known as the Hawkeye, this is the most popular,
most maligned, most ironically named of all apple varieties
in the US. It now has thick skin, a one-note sweet flavor,
and an often crumbly texture.
 
2. With a soft skin and softer flesh, this common apple strikes
a level balance between sweet and acidic.
 
3. Considered an all-purpose apple, it can commonly be bought in
bulk for low prices and is described as mild and sweet, with
a juicy flesh.
 
4. If you're into tartness, this bitter old bird is your go-to.
Its crisp, juicy flesh, however, does sweeten with storage.
 
5. The product of efforts to develop cold-weather apples, this
apple keeps things simple with a light overall flavor profile
that's more sweet than tart. It's also juicy and moderately
crunchy.
 
6. Introduced in New York in the 1960s, this apple is a cross
between <answers 1 and 2>, despite its thin skin. It is crisp
and retains both the sweetness and tartness of its two parent
apples.
 
7. Created in Japan this apple is a cross between <answer 1> and
the Ralls Genet. It is described as dense, crisp and one of
the sweetest of all varieties.
 
8. This New Zealand breed has been gaining in popularity in North
America. Its skin is thin, concealing a crisp and juicy flesh
that's fragrant and fairly sweet.
 
9. This apple has a creamy white interior and both sweet-and-tart
flavors. It is relatively soft and functions as an all-purpose
apple, which means you can bake it, cook it, or eat it raw.
 
10. This apple also originates from New Zealand and produces a firm,
crisp bite and offers a pleasing balance between sweet and tart.
These apples a good for baking as well as eating raw.
 
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "You keep using that word. I do not think it means
msb@vex.net | what you think it means." -- The Princess Bride
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Jan 20 04:15AM -0600

Sorry, I accidentally posted this in the previous thread.
Please respond to either posting, but preferably this one.
 
 
These questions were written to be asked in Toronto on 2017-11-27,
and should be interpreted accordingly.
 
On each question you may give up to two answers, but if you give
both a right answer and a wrong answer, there is a small penalty.
Please post all your answers to the newsgroup in a single followup,
based only on your own knowledge. (In your answer posting, quote
the questions and place your answer below each one.) I will reveal
the correct answers in about 3 days.
 
All questions were written by members of Smith & Guessin' and are
used here by permission, but have been reformatted and may have
been retyped and/or edited by me. For further information see
my 2017-09-25 companion posting on "Questions from the Canadian
Inquisition (QFTCI*)".
 
 
* Game 10, Round 7 - Entertainment - When They were Young
 
Again I have rearranged the questions in order of the handout:
 
http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/g10r7/young.pdf
 
There were 5 decoys, which are interspersed with the others.
Answer the decoys if you like for fun, but for no points.
 
In each case you simply provide the name of the famous person
shown here when they were young. We'll give you their profession
and nationality, or less information for the decoys. In all cases
the surname will suffice.
 
1. American actor.
2. British actor.
3. British actress.
4. British musician.
5. (Decoy) Actress.
6. British musician.
7. British comedian and activist.
8. American athlete.
9. American TV personality.
10. (Decoy) Leading woman in her field.
11. American actor.
12. (Decoy) Politician.
13. (Decoy) Actress.
14. (Decoy) Politician.
15. British actress.
 
 
* Game 10, Round 8 - Miscellanous - Apples
 
And once again I have rearranged the questions in order of the
handout:
 
http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/g10r8/apples.pdf
 
This time there were no decoys. In each case you simply name the
variety of apple.
 
1. Originally known as the Hawkeye, this is the most popular,
most maligned, most ironically named of all apple varieties
in the US. It now has thick skin, a one-note sweet flavor,
and an often crumbly texture.
 
2. With a soft skin and softer flesh, this common apple strikes
a level balance between sweet and acidic.
 
3. Considered an all-purpose apple, it can commonly be bought in
bulk for low prices and is described as mild and sweet, with
a juicy flesh.
 
4. If you're into tartness, this bitter old bird is your go-to.
Its crisp, juicy flesh, however, does sweeten with storage.
 
5. The product of efforts to develop cold-weather apples, this
apple keeps things simple with a light overall flavor profile
that's more sweet than tart. It's also juicy and moderately
crunchy.
 
6. Introduced in New York in the 1960s, this apple is a cross
between <answers 1 and 2>, despite its thin skin. It is crisp
and retains both the sweetness and tartness of its two parent
apples.
 
7. Created in Japan this apple is a cross between <answer 1> and
the Ralls Genet. It is described as dense, crisp and one of
the sweetest of all varieties.
 
8. This New Zealand breed has been gaining in popularity in North
America. Its skin is thin, concealing a crisp and juicy flesh
that's fragrant and fairly sweet.
 
9. This apple has a creamy white interior and both sweet-and-tart
flavors. It is relatively soft and functions as an all-purpose
apple, which means you can bake it, cook it, or eat it raw.
 
10. This apple also originates from New Zealand and produces a firm,
crisp bite and offers a pleasing balance between sweet and tart.
These apples a good for baking as well as eating raw.
 
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "You keep using that word. I do not think it means
msb@vex.net | what you think it means." -- The Princess Bride
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
"Peter Smyth" <smythp@gmail.com>: Jan 20 10:25AM

Mark Brader wrote:
 
> most maligned, most ironically named of all apple varieties
> in the US. It now has thick skin, a one-note sweet flavor,
> and an often crumbly texture.
Red Delicious
 
> 3. Considered an all-purpose apple, it can commonly be bought in
> bulk for low prices and is described as mild and sweet, with
> a juicy flesh.
Golden Delicious
> 4. If you're into tartness, this bitter old bird is your go-to.
> Its crisp, juicy flesh, however, does sweeten with storage.
Granny Smith
> apple keeps things simple with a light overall flavor profile
> that's more sweet than tart. It's also juicy and moderately
> crunchy.
Cox's Orange Pippin
> between <answers 1 and 2>, despite its thin skin. It is crisp
> and retains both the sweetness and tartness of its two parent
> apples.
Red Delicious
 
> 8. This New Zealand breed has been gaining in popularity in North
> America. Its skin is thin, concealing a crisp and juicy flesh
> that's fragrant and fairly sweet.
Pink Lady
 
> 10. This apple also originates from New Zealand and produces a firm,
> crisp bite and offers a pleasing balance between sweet and tart.
> These apples a good for baking as well as eating raw.
 
 
Peter Smyth
Dan Tilque <dtilque@frontier.com>: Jan 19 06:48PM -0800

Gareth Owen wrote:
 
> Usual RQ rules apply, Closing 00:01 AM GMT, Sunday 21st Jan.
 
> 1. Which candidate won the third highest share of the popular vote in the 2016
> US Presidential Election?
 
Jill Stein
 
 
> 2. Who was the first African American to win an Academy Award in an
> acting category?
 
the woman who played the maid in Gone with the Wind, can't remember her name
 
 
> 3. Who was the first person to win two Nobel Prizes?
 
Marie Curie
 
 
> 4. Who, in 1997, became the youngest person to win a Grammy award?
 
> 5. Which gymnast was first to record a perfect 10 in an Olympic
> gymnastics competition?
 
Olga Korbut
 
 
> 6. Which Hollywood star also made breakthroughs in the field of radio
> communications, including frequency hopping and spread spectrum?
 
Hedy Lamarr
 
 
> 7. Who is presently Prime Minister of New Zealand?
 
> 8. The recent film "The Post" stars Meryl Streep as which newspaper
> owner?
 
Katharine Graham
 
 
--
Dan Tilque
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Friday, January 19, 2018

Digest for rec.games.trivia@googlegroups.com - 6 updates in 2 topics

Marc Dashevsky <usenet@MarcDashevsky.com>: Jan 18 02:39PM -0600

In article <K_-dnVshg8jxhcLHnZ2dnUU7-YnNnZ2d@giganews.com>, msb@vex.net says...
> no points.
 
> 1. "La Gerbe" (1953).
> 2. "A Bar at the Folies Bergère" (1882).
Manet
 
> 3. "Christ Carrying the Cross" (1535).
> 4. "Victory Boogie Woogie" (1944).
> 5. Untitled (1940).
Mondrian
 
> 11. "The Swallow's Tail" (1983).
> 12. "Simeon with the Christ Child in the Temple" (1669).
> 13. "Two Dancers Resting" (1896).
Degas
 
 
 
 
--
Replace "usenet" with "marc" in the e-mail address.
Joshua Kreitzer <gromit82@hotmail.com>: Jan 19 03:41AM

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote in news:K_-dnVshg8jxhcLHnZ2dnUU7-
 
> From the title (sometimes translated into English) and the year
> of the painting, you name the artist.
 
> 1. "La Gerbe" (1953).
 
Matisse
 
> 2. "A Bar at the Folies Bergère" (1882).
 
Toulouse-Lautrec
 
> 4. "Victory Boogie Woogie" (1944).
 
Mondrian
 
> 5. Untitled (1940).
 
Miro
 
> 6. (Decoy) Self-portrait (1972).
 
Picasso
 
> 11. "The Swallow's Tail" (1983).
 
Dali
 
> 12. "Simeon with the Christ Child in the Temple" (1669).
 
Rembrandt
 
> 13. "Two Dancers Resting" (1896).
 
Degas

> award is named for which pioneer hockey broadcaster?
 
> 2. Who resigned his Hockey Hall of Fame membership in 1998 after
> pleading guilty to criminal charges?
 
Eagleson
 
> In fact Toronto was not the first choice for the site.
> Which eastern Ontario city originally go the nod, but then
> couldn't get the project done?
 
Ottawa
 
> admitted to the Hall of Fame this year.
 
> 5. Joining the Hall this year as a builder is Jeremy Jacobs,
> the owner since 1975 of which "Original Six" NHL team?
 
Boston Bruins; New York Rangers
 
> 6. Four NHL players were admitted this year: Dave Andreychuk,
> Paul Kariya, Mark Recchi, and Temmu Selanne. Which one of them
> played for the Toronto Maple Leafs?
 
Dave Andreychuk; Mark Recchi
 
> Please decode the rot13 for the remaining questions only after
> you have finished with #7.
 
Well, that's going to be difficult, since #7 is itself encoded in rot13,
but I assume I know what you mean.
 
> 8. Cnhy Xnevln cynlrq va 2 Bylzcvpf sbe Pnanqn naq sbe 4 AUY grnzf
> bire 15 frnfbaf. Anzr *nal bar* bs gubfr 4 AUY grnzf.
 
Vancouver Canucks
 
> 10. Grrzh Frynaar fpberq 684 AUY tbnyf naq urycrq Nanurvz jva gur
> Fgnayrl Phc va 2007. Gur "Svaavfu Synfu" fgvyy ubyqf gur erpbeq
> bs 76 tbnyf ol n ebbxvr, frg va 1992-93 jvgu juvpu Pnanqvna grnz?
 
Edmonton Oilers
 
--
Joshua Kreitzer
gromit82@hotmail.com
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Jan 19 12:58AM -0600

Mark Brader:
> > Please decode the rot13 for the remaining questions only after
> > you have finished with #7.
 
Joshua Kreitzer:
> Well, that's going to be difficult, since #7 is itself encoded in rot13...
 
But 13 - 7 = 6, doesn't it? *Really* now! :-)
--
Mark Brader "Although I have not seen any mention of SoftQuad
Toronto or HoTMetaL in the magazine, it is certainly
msb@vex.net worth while reading." -- Selwyn Wener
"Peter Smyth" <smythp@gmail.com>: Jan 18 11:08AM

Gareth Owen wrote:
 
 
> Usual RQ rules apply, Closing 00:01 AM GMT, Sunday 21st Jan.
 
> 1. Which candidate won the third highest share of the popular vote in the 2016
> US Presidential Election?
McMullen
> 2. Who was the first African American to win an Academy Award in an
> acting category?
Washington
> 3. Who was the first person to win two Nobel Prizes?
Curie
> 4. Who, in 1997, became the youngest person to win a Grammy award?
Spears
> 5. Which gymnast was first to record a perfect 10 in an Olympic
> gymnastics competition?
Comaneci
> owner?
 
> Tie break: The highest and lowest points of the continental United
> States are both in Californa. How far apart are they?
584km
 
 
Peter Smyth
Erland Sommarskog <esquel@sommarskog.se>: Jan 18 04:41PM +0100

> 1. Which candidate won the third highest share of the popular vote in
> the 2016
> US Presidential Election?
 
Jill Smith
 
> 3. Who was the first person to win two Nobel Prizes?
 
Marie Curie
 
> 5. Which gymnast was first to record a perfect 10 in an Olympic
> gymnastics competition?
 
Nadia Comaneci
 
> 7. Who is presently Prime Minister of New Zealand?
 
It's no longer Helen Clark, that's all I know.
 
> Tie break: The highest and lowest points of the continental United
> States are both in Californa. How far apart are they?
 
1200 km
Marc Dashevsky <usenet@MarcDashevsky.com>: Jan 18 02:42PM -0600

In article <87mv1cnu1k.fsf@gmail.com>, gwowen@gmail.com says...
 
> Usual RQ rules apply, Closing 00:01 AM GMT, Sunday 21st Jan.
 
> 1. Which candidate won the third highest share of the popular vote in the 2016
> US Presidential Election?
Sanders
 
> 2. Who was the first African American to win an Academy Award in an
> acting category?
Poitier
 
> 3. Who was the first person to win two Nobel Prizes?
Marie Curie
 
> gymnastics competition?
 
> 6. Which Hollywood star also made breakthroughs in the field of radio
> communications, including frequency hopping and spread spectrum?
Dorothy Lamour
 
> 7. Who is presently Prime Minister of New Zealand?
 
> 8. The recent film "The Post" stars Meryl Streep as which newspaper
> owner?
Graham
 
 
--
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Thursday, January 18, 2018

Digest for rec.games.trivia@googlegroups.com - 7 updates in 3 topics

Erland Sommarskog <esquel@sommarskog.se>: Jan 17 12:32PM +0100

> 2. "A Bar at the Folies Bergère" (1882).
 
Gauguin
 
> 3. "Christ Carrying the Cross" (1535).
 
Vermeer
 
> 5. Untitled (1940).
 
Picasso
 
> 9. "Viva la Vida Watermelons" (1954).
 
Dali
 
> 10. "The Beyond" (1972).
 
Kandinsky
 
> 11. "The Swallow's Tail" (1983).
 
Kandinsky
 
> 12. "Simeon with the Christ Child in the Temple" (1669).
 
Rembrandt van Rijn
 
> 13. "Two Dancers Resting" (1896).
 
Vincent van Gogh
tool@panix.com (Dan Blum): Jan 17 02:22PM


> * Game 10, Round 4 - Art - Last Works
 
> 2. "A Bar at the Folies Berg?re" (1882).
 
Degas; Toulouse-Lautrec
 
> 3. "Christ Carrying the Cross" (1535).
 
Arcimboldo; Hans Holbein the Younger
 
> 4. "Victory Boogie Woogie" (1944).
 
Mondrian
 
> 5. Untitled (1940).
 
Giacometti
 
> 10. "The Beyond" (1972).
 
Rothko
 
> 11. "The Swallow's Tail" (1983).
 
Miro
 
> 12. "Simeon with the Christ Child in the Temple" (1669).
 
El Greco
 
> 13. "Two Dancers Resting" (1896).
 
Toulouse-Lautrec; Degas
 
> * Game 10, Round 6 - Sports - Hockey Hall of Fame
 
> 5. Joining the Hall this year as a builder is Jeremy Jacobs,
> the owner since 1975 of which "Original Six" NHL team?
 
Red Wings
 
> 6. Four NHL players were admitted this year: Dave Andreychuk,
> Paul Kariya, Mark Recchi, and Temmu Selanne. Which one of them
> played for the Toronto Maple Leafs?
 
Selanne; Recchi
 
> 7. Jura Qnir Naqerlpuhx jba gur Fgnayrl Phc va 2004, ur gvrq
> gur erpbeq bs cynlvat 22 frnfbaf orsber jvaavat uvf svefg gvgyr.
> Sbe juvpu grnz jnf Naqerlpuhx gur pncgnva gung lrne?
 
Avalanche
 
> 8. Cnhy Xnevln cynlrq va 2 Bylzcvpf sbe Pnanqn naq sbe 4 AUY grnzf
> bire 15 frnfbaf. Anzr *nal bar* bs gubfr 4 AUY grnzf.
 
Maple Leafs; Blackhawks
 
> 9. Znex Erppuv cynlrq 22 frnfbaf jvgu 7 grnzf. Anzr nal bs gur
> 3 grnzf Erppuv jba n Fgnayrl Phc jvgu.
 
Oilers; Rangers
 
> 10. Grrzh Frynaar fpberq 684 AUY tbnyf naq urycrq Nanurvz jva gur
> Fgnayrl Phc va 2007. Gur "Svaavfu Synfu" fgvyy ubyqf gur erpbeq
> bs 76 tbnyf ol n ebbxvr, frg va 1992-93 jvgu juvpu Pnanqvna grnz?
 
Canadiens; Oilers
 
--
_______________________________________________________________________
Dan Blum tool@panix.com
"I wouldn't have believed it myself if I hadn't just made it up."
Pete Gayde <pagrsg@wowway.com>: Jan 18 12:52AM

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote in news:K_-dnVshg8jxhcLHnZ2dnUU7-
> no points.
 
> 1. "La Gerbe" (1953).
> 2. "A Bar at the Folies Bergère" (1882).
 
Toulouse Latrec
 
> 3. "Christ Carrying the Cross" (1535).
> 4. "Victory Boogie Woogie" (1944).
 
Mondrian
 
> 5. Untitled (1940).
 
Miro
 
> 6. (Decoy) Self-portrait (1972).
 
Picasso
 
> 9. "Viva la Vida Watermelons" (1954).
> 10. "The Beyond" (1972).
> 11. "The Swallow's Tail" (1983).
 
Dali
 
> 12. "Simeon with the Christ Child in the Temple" (1669).
 
Rembrandt
 
> 13. "Two Dancers Resting" (1896).
 
Manet
 
 
> 1. Each year the Hall of Fame honors a newspaper writer and a
> broadcaster for their career contributions. The broadcast
> award is named for which pioneer hockey broadcaster?
 
Hewitt
 
> In fact Toronto was not the first choice for the site.
> Which eastern Ontario city originally go the nod, but then
> couldn't get the project done?
 
Ottawa
 
> 8-time world champion and 2-time Olympic gold medalist.
> Name this Quebec native, who becomes the 5th woman player in
> the Hall of Fame
 
Wickenheiser
 
 
> 5. Joining the Hall this year as a builder is Jeremy Jacobs,
> the owner since 1975 of which "Original Six" NHL team?
 
Bruins
 
 
> 6. Four NHL players were admitted this year: Dave Andreychuk,
> Paul Kariya, Mark Recchi, and Temmu Selanne. Which one of them
> played for the Toronto Maple Leafs?
 
Andreychuk; Recchi
 
 
> 7. Jura Qnir Naqerlpuhx jba gur Fgnayrl Phc va 2004, ur gvrq
> gur erpbeq bs cynlvat 22 frnfbaf orsber jvaavat uvf svefg gvgyr.
> Sbe juvpu grnz jnf Naqerlpuhx gur pncgnva gung lrne?
 
Rangers; Avalanche
 
 
> 8. Cnhy Xnevln cynlrq va 2 Bylzcvpf sbe Pnanqn naq sbe 4 AUY grnzf
> bire 15 frnfbaf. Anzr *nal bar* bs gubfr 4 AUY grnzf.
 
Anaheim
 
 
> 9. Znex Erppuv cynlrq 22 frnfbaf jvgu 7 grnzf. Anzr nal bs gur
> 3 grnzf Erppuv jba n Fgnayrl Phc jvgu.
 
Avalanche; Rangers
 
 
> 10. Grrzh Frynaar fpberq 684 AUY tbnyf naq urycrq Nanurvz jva gur
> Fgnayrl Phc va 2007. Gur "Svaavfu Synfu" fgvyy ubyqf gur erpbeq
> bs 76 tbnyf ol n ebbxvr, frg va 1992-93 jvgu juvpu Pnanqvna grnz?
 
Winnipeg Jets
 
 
Pete Gayde
Gareth Owen <gwowen@gmail.com>: Jan 17 07:51PM

Sorry about the delay - new job taking more time than I expected.
 
Usual RQ rules apply, Closing 00:01 AM GMT, Sunday 21st Jan.
 
1. Which candidate won the third highest share of the popular vote in the 2016
US Presidential Election?
 
2. Who was the first African American to win an Academy Award in an
acting category?
 
3. Who was the first person to win two Nobel Prizes?
 
4. Who, in 1997, became the youngest person to win a Grammy award?
 
5. Which gymnast was first to record a perfect 10 in an Olympic
gymnastics competition?
 
6. Which Hollywood star also made breakthroughs in the field of radio
communications, including frequency hopping and spread spectrum?
 
7. Who is presently Prime Minister of New Zealand?
 
8. The recent film "The Post" stars Meryl Streep as which newspaper
owner?
 
Tie break: The highest and lowest points of the continental United
States are both in Californa. How far apart are they?
tool@panix.com (Dan Blum): Jan 17 08:14PM


> 1. Which candidate won the third highest share of the popular vote in the 2016
> US Presidential Election?
 
Jill Stein
 
> 2. Who was the first African American to win an Academy Award in an
> acting category?
 
Butterfly McQueen
 
> 3. Who was the first person to win two Nobel Prizes?
 
Marie Curie
 
> 4. Who, in 1997, became the youngest person to win a Grammy award?
 
Jewel
 
> 5. Which gymnast was first to record a perfect 10 in an Olympic
> gymnastics competition?
 
Nadia Comaneci
 
> 6. Which Hollywood star also made breakthroughs in the field of radio
> communications, including frequency hopping and spread spectrum?
 
Hedy Lamarr
 
> 8. The recent film "The Post" stars Meryl Streep as which newspaper
> owner?
 
Katherine Graham
 
> Tie break: The highest and lowest points of the continental United
> States are both in Californa. How far apart are they?
 
200 miles
 
--
_______________________________________________________________________
Dan Blum tool@panix.com
"I wouldn't have believed it myself if I hadn't just made it up."
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Jan 17 06:12PM -0600

Gareth Owen:
> 2. Who was the first African American to win an Academy Award in an
> acting category?
 
Poitier.

> 3. Who was the first person to win two Nobel Prizes?
 
Marie Curie.

> 4. Who, in 1997, became the youngest person to win a Grammy award?
 
Adele?

> 5. Which gymnast was first to record a perfect 10 in an Olympic
> gymnastics competition?
 
Comaneci.

> 6. Which Hollywood star also made breakthroughs in the field of radio
> communications, including frequency hopping and spread spectrum?
 
Lamarr.

> 8. The recent film "The Post" stars Meryl Streep as which newspaper
> owner?
 
Graham.

> Tie break: The highest and lowest points of the continental United
> States are both in Californa. How far apart are they?
 
25 miles.
--
Mark Brader | "The closest I can get to describing her is to compare
Toronto | the feeling one gets from picking up a ten-card suit..."
msb@vex.net | --Zia Mahmood
Gareth Owen <gwowen@gmail.com>: Jan 17 07:54PM


> 1 The French sandwich 'croque-monsieur' is traditionally filled with
> which two foodstuffs?
 
Fromage, jambon
 
> 2 What is the legal term for a document that supplements, explains,
> modifies or revokes a will?
 
Codicile
 
> 3 Which planet takes approximately 165 years to orbit the sun?
 
Neptune?
 
> 4 Aibohphobia, appropriately, is the fear of what?
 
Palindromes
 
> 5 Michael Caine starred twice in which film, directed by Joseph
> L. Mankiewicz in 1972, and by Kenneth Brannagh in 2007? He portrayed
> the younger man in the first film, and the older in the second.
 
Sleuth
 
> 6 Which hit song of 1965 includes the following line: "When you're
> alone and life is making you lonely"?
 
Downtown
 
> 7 Lent traditionally lasts for how many days?
 
40
 
> 8 The main hub for the Etihad airline is located in which city?
 
Abu Dhabi
 
> 9 The Miller Brewing Company is headquartered in which US city?
 
What made Milwaukee famous,
Has made a loser out of me
 
> 10 In which classic western folk song do the deer and the antelope roam?
 
Home on the Range
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