Sunday, September 22, 2019

Digest for rec.games.trivia@googlegroups.com - 1 update in 1 topic

Dan Tilque <dtilque@frontier.com>: Sep 22 01:19AM -0700

On 9/19/19 11:07 PM, Mark Brader wrote:
> Woolcott, who at the time held what was arguably the most
> prestigious arts-and-literature job in the North American press.
> What job?
 
Editor of New Yorker magazine
 
 
> 4. Which one of the Marx brothers was an Algonquin?
 
Harpo
 
 
> 5. Playwright Beatrice Kaufman was an Algonquin. So was her more
> famous theatrical-legend husband. Name him.
 
Benchley
 
> in Hitchcock's "Lifeboat", with the words "Dahlings, I was
> wonderful". Of Hollywood, she asked studio boss Irving Thalberg,
> "How do you get laid in this dreadful place?" Name her.
 
Mae West
 
 
> 7. This charter Algonquin, a legendary humorist, later had a
> grandson who would grow up to write "Jaws". Give their surname.
 
Benchley
 
 
> 8. Charter Algonquin Harold Ross was one of the famous editors ever.
> What publication did he found and edit for decades?
 
Vanity Fair
 
 
> 10. In one of the most succinct reviews ever, Algonquin Dorothy
> Parker wrote: "Tonstant Weader fwowed up." Which children's
> classic was she referencing?
 
Winnie the Poo
 
> Unnatural Axxxe).
 
> 1. Canadian Museum for Human Rights, The Forks National Historic
> Site, Assiniboine Park.
 
Winnipeg
 
 
> 2. The Rooms, Quidi Vidi ["kiddy viddy"], George Street.
 
> 3. Babe Ruth Birthplace Museum, Fort McHenry National Monument,
> Inner Harbor, Camden Yards.
 
Baltimore
 
 
> 4. Independence Hall, Reading ["redding"] Terminal Market,
> Franklin Institute.
 
Philiadelphia
 
 
> 5. Busch Gardens, Ybor ["ee-bor"] City, Sunshine Skyway Bridge.
 
Tampa
 
 
> 6. La Jolla ["hoya"] Cove, Balboa Park, USS Midway Museum.
 
San Diego
 
 
> 7. Ryman Auditorium, Johnny Cash Museum, Country Music Hall of Fame.
 
Nashville
 
 
> 8. LBJ Presidential Library, Congress Avenue Bridge and Bat Colony,
> State Capitol Building.
 
Austin
 
 
> 9. JFK Presidential Library, Freedom Trail, Quincy Market.
 
Boston
 
 
> 10. Space Needle, Chihuly Garden and Glass Exhibit, Mt. Rainier.
 
Seattle
 
--
Dan Tilque
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Saturday, September 21, 2019

Digest for rec.games.trivia@googlegroups.com - 4 updates in 1 topic

tool@panix.com (Dan Blum): Sep 20 01:52PM

> It was mentioned in the title of the movie about Dorothy
> Parker that starred Jennifer Jason Leigh. What did they call
> themselves?
 
Vicious Circle
 
> Yvyv Gnlybe va "Zef. Cnexre naq gur Ivpvbhf Pvepyr" -- jebgr
> gur abiry gung cebivqrq gur onfvf sbe gur zhfvpny "Fubj Obng",
> nf jryy nf "Tvnag" naq "Fgntr Qbbe". Anzr ure.
 
Edna Ferber
 
> Woolcott, who at the time held what was arguably the most
> prestigious arts-and-literature job in the North American press.
> What job?
 
theater critic for the New York Times
 
> 4. Which one of the Marx brothers was an Algonquin?
 
Harpo
 
> 5. Playwright Beatrice Kaufman was an Algonquin. So was her more
> famous theatrical-legend husband. Name him.
 
George Kaufman
 
> in Hitchcock's "Lifeboat", with the words "Dahlings, I was
> wonderful". Of Hollywood, she asked studio boss Irving Thalberg,
> "How do you get laid in this dreadful place?" Name her.
 
Talullah Bankhead
 
> 7. This charter Algonquin, a legendary humorist, later had a
> grandson who would grow up to write "Jaws". Give their surname.
 
Benchley
 
> 8. Charter Algonquin Harold Ross was one of the famous editors ever.
> What publication did he found and edit for decades?
 
New Yorker
 
> columnist was a regular at the Algonquins' Saturday night
> poker games. His first name was actually Ringgold. He also
> had a famous son with the same first name. Name him.
 
Ring Lardner
 
> 10. In one of the most succinct reviews ever, Algonquin Dorothy
> Parker wrote: "Tonstant Weader fwowed up." Which children's
> classic was she referencing?
 
Winnie-the-Pooh
 
> * Game 10, Round 3 - Geography - North American Tourist Attractions
 
> 1. Canadian Museum for Human Rights, The Forks National Historic
> Site, Assiniboine Park.
 
Ottawa
 
> 2. The Rooms, Quidi Vidi ["kiddy viddy"], George Street.
 
Vancouver; Halifax
 
> 3. Babe Ruth Birthplace Museum, Fort McHenry National Monument,
> Inner Harbor, Camden Yards.
 
Baltimore
 
> 4. Independence Hall, Reading ["redding"] Terminal Market,
> Franklin Institute.
 
Philadelphia
 
> 5. Busch Gardens, Ybor ["ee-bor"] City, Sunshine Skyway Bridge.
 
Tampa
 
> 6. La Jolla ["hoya"] Cove, Balboa Park, USS Midway Museum.
 
San Diego
 
> 7. Ryman Auditorium, Johnny Cash Museum, Country Music Hall of Fame.
 
Nashville
 
> 8. LBJ Presidential Library, Congress Avenue Bridge and Bat Colony,
> State Capitol Building.
 
Austin
 
> 9. JFK Presidential Library, Freedom Trail, Quincy Market.
 
Boston
 
> 10. Space Needle, Chihuly Garden and Glass Exhibit, Mt. Rainier.
 
Seattle
 
--
_______________________________________________________________________
Dan Blum tool@panix.com
"I wouldn't have believed it myself if I hadn't just made it up."
Bruce Bowler <bruce.bowler@gmail.com>: Sep 20 02:58PM

On Fri, 20 Sep 2019 01:07:38 -0500, Mark Brader wrote:
 
 
> * Game 10, Round 2 - Literature - The Algonquin Round Table.
 
 
> 7. This charter Algonquin, a legendary humorist, later had a
> grandson who would grow up to write "Jaws". Give their surname.
 
Benchley
 
> of places visited fairly recently by Brian (of Unnatural Axxxe).
 
> 3. Babe Ruth Birthplace Museum, Fort McHenry National Monument,
> Inner Harbor, Camden Yards.
 
Baltimore, MD
 
> 4. Independence Hall, Reading ["redding"] Terminal Market,
> Franklin Institute.
 
Philadelphia, PA
 
> 5. Busch Gardens, Ybor ["ee-bor"] City, Sunshine Skyway Bridge.
 
Tampa, FL
 
> 6. La Jolla ["hoya"] Cove, Balboa Park, USS Midway Museum.
 
San Diego, CA
 
> 7. Ryman Auditorium, Johnny Cash Museum, Country Music Hall of Fame.
 
Nashville, TN
 
> 8. LBJ Presidential Library, Congress Avenue Bridge and Bat Colony,
> State Capitol Building.
 
Austin, TX
 
> 9. JFK Presidential Library, Freedom Trail, Quincy Market.
 
Boston, MA
 
> 10. Space Needle, Chihuly Garden and Glass Exhibit, Mt. Rainier.
 
Seattle, WA
Erland Sommarskog <esquel@sommarskog.se>: Sep 20 05:25PM +0200

> * Game 10, Round 3 - Geography - North American Tourist Attractions
 
> 1. Canadian Museum for Human Rights, The Forks National Historic
> Site, Assiniboine Park.
 
Ottawa

> 4. Independence Hall, Reading ["redding"] Terminal Market,
> Franklin Institute.
 
Philadelphia

> 7. Ryman Auditorium, Johnny Cash Museum, Country Music Hall of Fame.
 
Nashville
 
> 10. Space Needle, Chihuly Garden and Glass Exhibit, Mt. Rainier.
 
Seattle.
Joshua Kreitzer <gromit82@hotmail.com>: Sep 21 12:42AM

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote in news:2ZydnTDxJ-M38RnAnZ2dnUU7-
> It was mentioned in the title of the movie about Dorothy
> Parker that starred Jennifer Jason Leigh. What did they call
> themselves?
 
the Vicious Circle
 
> Yvyv Gnlybe va "Zef. Cnexre naq gur Ivpvbhf Pvepyr" -- jebgr
> gur abiry gung cebivqrq gur onfvf sbe gur zhfvpny "Fubj Obng",
> nf jryy nf "Tvnag" naq "Fgntr Qbbe". Anzr ure.
 
Ferber

> Woolcott, who at the time held what was arguably the most
> prestigious arts-and-literature job in the North American press.
> What job?
 
New York Times theatre critic
 
> 4. Which one of the Marx brothers was an Algonquin?
 
Harpo Marx

> 5. Playwright Beatrice Kaufman was an Algonquin. So was her more
> famous theatrical-legend husband. Name him.
 
George S. Kaufman
 
> in Hitchcock's "Lifeboat", with the words "Dahlings, I was
> wonderful". Of Hollywood, she asked studio boss Irving Thalberg,
> "How do you get laid in this dreadful place?" Name her.
 
Tallulah Bankhead

> 7. This charter Algonquin, a legendary humorist, later had a
> grandson who would grow up to write "Jaws". Give their surname.
 
Benchley
 
> 8. Charter Algonquin Harold Ross was one of the famous editors ever.
> What publication did he found and edit for decades?
 
The New Yorker

> columnist was a regular at the Algonquins' Saturday night
> poker games. His first name was actually Ringgold. He also
> had a famous son with the same first name. Name him.
 
Ring Lardner
 
> 10. In one of the most succinct reviews ever, Algonquin Dorothy
> Parker wrote: "Tonstant Weader fwowed up." Which children's
> classic was she referencing?
 
"Winnie the Pooh"

> Unnatural Axxxe).
 
> 3. Babe Ruth Birthplace Museum, Fort McHenry National Monument,
> Inner Harbor, Camden Yards.
 
Baltimore
 
> 4. Independence Hall, Reading ["redding"] Terminal Market,
> Franklin Institute.
 
Philadelphia

> 5. Busch Gardens, Ybor ["ee-bor"] City, Sunshine Skyway Bridge.
 
Tampa
 
> 6. La Jolla ["hoya"] Cove, Balboa Park, USS Midway Museum.
 
San Diego

> 7. Ryman Auditorium, Johnny Cash Museum, Country Music Hall of Fame.
 
Nashville
 
> 8. LBJ Presidential Library, Congress Avenue Bridge and Bat Colony,
> State Capitol Building.
 
Austin

> 9. JFK Presidential Library, Freedom Trail, Quincy Market.
 
Boston
 
> 10. Space Needle, Chihuly Garden and Glass Exhibit, Mt. Rainier.
 
Seattle
 
--
Joshua Kreitzer
gromit82@hotmail.com
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Friday, September 20, 2019

Digest for rec.games.trivia@googlegroups.com - 3 updates in 2 topics

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Sep 20 01:05AM -0500

Mark Brader:
> those usurpers in Vancouver in the last game. All of these movies
> were shot at least partly in Toronto. In each case we give the
> release date and describe the movie, and you name it.
 
In the original game the dates given were the date of filming.
I thought that was an unnecessary complication, so I changed it.
 
> 1. 2002: An Oscar-winning American crime comedy-drama musical
> starring Richard Gere and Catherine Zeta Jones.
 
"Chicago". 4 for Dan Blum, Calvin, Joshua, and Pete.
 
> 2. 2007: A musical romantic comedy starring John Travolta, based
> on a 2002 Broadway musical, which was based in turn on a 1988
> John Waters movie.
 
"Hairspray". 4 for Dan Blum, Calvin, Joshua, and Pete.
 
> 3. 1999: Directed by Adam Rifkin, this movie tells the story of
> four teenaged boys in a Kiss tribute band trying to see their
> heroes play in Detroit.
 
"Detroit Rock City". 4 for Joshua.
 
> is about a widowed, 37-year-old, Italian-American woman who
> falls in love with her fiance's estranged, hot-tempered younger
> brother.
 
"Moonstruck". 4 for Dan Blum, Joshua, and Pete.
 
> 5. 2017: An Oscar-winning science-fiction romance written and
> directed by Guillermo del Toro.
 
"The Shape of Water". 4 for Dan Blum, Joshua, and Pete.
 
> 6. 2005: This family comedy movie starring Vin Diesel is the story
> of a Navy SEAL looking for a secret project called GHOST while
> acting as a nanny for 5 children.
 
"The Pacifier".
 
> 7. 1984: This police movie starring Steve Guttenberg and Kim
> Cattrall would spawn 6 sequels.
 
"Police Academy". 4 for Dan Blum, Calvin, and Joshua.
 
> of graphic novels by Bryan Lee O'Malley. It tells the story
> of a slacker musician who must fight the seven evil exes of
> his new girlfriend.
 
"Scott Pilgrim vs. the World". 4 for Dan Blum and Joshua.
 
> 9. 1997: A drama starring Robin Williams and Matt Damon, which tells
> the story of a South Boston janitor who is an unrecognized
> genius.
 
"Good Will Hunting". 4 for Dan Blum, Calvin, Joshua, and Pete.
 
> 10. 1988: this David Cronenberg psychological horror movie stars
> Jeremy Irons as identical twin gynecologists.
 
"Dead Ringers". 4 for Dan Blum and Joshua.
 
 
 
> Two of Axxxe's own, Jim and B.J., have birthdays this week --
> July 24 and 26 respectively. So, here's a challenge round that
> hinges, not on July 22, but on those dates.
 
The same week as the original game, "Jeopardy!" had a category "On
this day: July 26". But, if you can imagine, they actually waited
until it *was* July 26 to show it -- incidentally on the last show
of the season. Anyway, their category had no overlap with our round.
 
> and Independence Day on July 26, the latter to commemorate
> the rejection in 1581 of the rule of King Philip II.
> Name that country.
 
Netherlands (accepting Holland). 4 for Dan Blum, Erland, Joshua,
and Dan Tilque.
 
> A2. On 1865-07-26, Wellington was declared the capital of
> New Zealand. What city was the previous capital?
 
Auckland. 4 for Erland, Joshua, and Dan Tilque. 3 for Calvin
and Pete. 2 for Dan Blum.
 
 
> wrote an editorial titled "Who Breaks a Butterfly on
> a Wheel?" The line is from Alexander Pope, but what was
> the *subject* of the editorial?
 
Jagger's harsh 3-month sentence for drug possession. 3 for Joshua.
 
The drugs in question were a small quantity of stimulants which
did not require a prescription in Italy, where he'd bought them,
but did in England. The sentence was overturned on appeal.
 
> his 1967 arrest. Years later, on her album Broken English,
> the caustic song Why'd You Do It? was understood to be
> directed at him for being a bad boyfriend. Name her.
 
Marianne Faithfull. 4 for Erland, Calvin, Joshua, and Pete.
 
 
> * C. "Honest Ed" Mirvish (born 1914-07-24)
 
> C1. Every year from 1987 until the store's demolition, Honest
> Ed's had a Christmas season giveaway of 10,000 what?
 
Turkeys.
 
> C2. In 1993, Ed and his theatrically-minded son David opened
> the Princess of Wales Theatre in Toronto's King St. theater
> district. What mega-musical opened the joint?
 
"Miss Saigon". 4 for Joshua.
 
 
 
> D1. On 1983-07-24, a game-winning home run was wiped away in
> what was known as "the pine tar incident". Name the player
> who was accused of doctoring his bat.
 
George Brett. 4 for Joshua and Pete.
 
> striking out more than 100 batters -- and he then extended
> it to 24 seasons in 1993, for a new unbeatable record.
> Name him.
 
Nolan Ryan. 4 for Dan Blum, Calvin, Joshua, and Pete.
 
 
 
> E1. On 2013-07-24, a high-speed train in Europe approached an
> 80 km/h curve at 190 km/h, and the resulting derailment
> killed 78 people. In which country did this disaster occur?
 
Spain. (At Santiago de Compostela.) 4 for Erland and Pete.
 
> E2. On 2005-07-26, a natural disaster occurred in Mumbai,
> eventually killing more than 5,000 people. What was it?
 
Flooding due to torrential rain. 4 for Erland. 3 for Calvin.
2 for Dan Blum.
 
 
> her only novel, "Save Me the Waltz", from his own upcoming
> book, "Tender is the Night". Name her -- first and last
> name.
 
Zelda Fitzgerald. 4 for Dan Blum and Joshua.
 
> F2. This author, born on 1894-07-26, wrote more than 50 books.
> One of them, "The Doors of Perception", inspired the name
> of the band the Doors. Name him.
 
Aldous Huxley. 4 for Joshua.
 
 
Scores, if there are no errors:
 
GAME 9 ROUNDS-> 2 3 4 6 7 8 9 10 BEST
TOPICS-> Lit Geo His Ent Mis Spo Can Cha SIX
Joshua Kreitzer 31 28 36 28 35 36 36 35 209
Dan Blum 22 39 30 20 24 31 32 16 178
Pete Gayde 8 34 30 8 23 20 20 19 146
"Calvin" 18 25 29 20 20 32 16 14 144
Dan Tilque 12 24 32 0 24 20 0 8 120
Bruce Bowler 8 24 36 4 20 19 -- -- 111
Erland Sommarskog 0 20 20 0 8 20 0 20 88
 
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | This is Programming as a True Art Form, where style
msb@vex.net | is more important than correctness... --Pontus Hedman
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Sep 20 01:09AM -0500

Mark Brader:
> > and should be interpreted accordingly... For further information
> > see my 2019-01-22 companion posting on "Questions from the Canadian
> > Inquisition (QFTCI*)".
 
Sorry, I momentarily forgot that this was the last set of Game 9.
Hearty congratulations to JOSHUA KREITZER, who has won another one!
 
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "We are geeks. Resistance is voltage over current."
msb@vex.net | --Greg Goss
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Sep 20 01:07AM -0500

These questions were written to be asked in Toronto on 2019-07-29,
and should be interpreted accordingly.
 
On each question you may give up to two answers, but if you give
both a right answer and a wrong answer, there is a small penalty.
Please post all your answers to the newsgroup in a single followup,
based only on your own knowledge. (In your answer posting, quote
the questions and place your answer below each one.) I will reveal
the correct answers in about 3 days.
 
All questions were written by members of Unnatural Axxxe and are
used here by permission, but have been reformatted and may have
been retyped and/or edited by me. For further information see
my 2019-01-22 companion posting on "Questions from the Canadian
Inquisition (QFTCI*)".
 
 
* Game 10, Round 2 - Literature - The Algonquin Round Table.
 
So, you think *your* gang is pretty funny when they get a few
drinks in them? The most famous luncheon group in American history,
the Algonquin Round Table, met daily from 1919 until 1929 at New
York's Algonquin Hotel. Here's a round on those lunchtime wits.
 
1. The Algonquins had their own "geometric" name for their group.
It was mentioned in the title of the movie about Dorothy
Parker that starred Jennifer Jason Leigh. What did they call
themselves?
 
2. Please decode the rot13 for this question only after you have
finished with the previous one. Guvf Nytbadhva -- cynlrq ol
Yvyv Gnlybe va "Zef. Cnexre naq gur Ivpvbhf Pvepyr" -- jebgr
gur abiry gung cebivqrq gur onfvf sbe gur zhfvpny "Fubj Obng",
nf jryy nf "Tvnag" naq "Fgntr Qbbe". Anzr ure.
 
3. The Round Table began as a practical joke / roast for Alexander
Woolcott, who at the time held what was arguably the most
prestigious arts-and-literature job in the North American press.
What job?
 
4. Which one of the Marx brothers was an Algonquin?
 
5. Playwright Beatrice Kaufman was an Algonquin. So was her more
famous theatrical-legend husband. Name him.
 
6. One of the most outspoken actresses ever, this Algonquin
accepted her New York Film Critics Award for her role
in Hitchcock's "Lifeboat", with the words "Dahlings, I was
wonderful". Of Hollywood, she asked studio boss Irving Thalberg,
"How do you get laid in this dreadful place?" Name her.
 
7. This charter Algonquin, a legendary humorist, later had a
grandson who would grow up to write "Jaws". Give their surname.
 
8. Charter Algonquin Harold Ross was one of the famous editors ever.
What publication did he found and edit for decades?
 
9. Not that interested in the lunches, this legendary sports
columnist was a regular at the Algonquins' Saturday night
poker games. His first name was actually Ringgold. He also
had a famous son with the same first name. Name him.
 
10. In one of the most succinct reviews ever, Algonquin Dorothy
Parker wrote: "Tonstant Weader fwowed up." Which children's
classic was she referencing?
 
 
* Game 10, Round 3 - Geography - North American Tourist Attractions
 
Tripadvisor provides lists of "things to do" for many destinations.
From a sample of these "top attractions", name the North American
city that they're found in (or near). Hint: This round follows
a familiar theme of places visited fairly recently by Brian (of
Unnatural Axxxe).
 
1. Canadian Museum for Human Rights, The Forks National Historic
Site, Assiniboine Park.
 
2. The Rooms, Quidi Vidi ["kiddy viddy"], George Street.
 
3. Babe Ruth Birthplace Museum, Fort McHenry National Monument,
Inner Harbor, Camden Yards.
 
4. Independence Hall, Reading ["redding"] Terminal Market,
Franklin Institute.
 
5. Busch Gardens, Ybor ["ee-bor"] City, Sunshine Skyway Bridge.
 
6. La Jolla ["hoya"] Cove, Balboa Park, USS Midway Museum.
 
7. Ryman Auditorium, Johnny Cash Museum, Country Music Hall of Fame.
 
8. LBJ Presidential Library, Congress Avenue Bridge and Bat Colony,
State Capitol Building.
 
9. JFK Presidential Library, Freedom Trail, Quincy Market.
 
10. Space Needle, Chihuly Garden and Glass Exhibit, Mt. Rainier.
 
--
Mark Brader | "... There are three kinds of death in this world.
Toronto | There's heart death, there's brain death, and
msb@vex.net | there's being off the network." -- Guy Almes
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
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Thursday, September 19, 2019

Digest for rec.games.trivia@googlegroups.com - 6 updates in 2 topics

Erland Sommarskog <esquel@sommarskog.se>: Sep 18 08:53PM +0200

> 2 There are countless variations, but what specific ingredient is
> always present in the Spanish dish paella?
 
Rice
 
> 4 A news photographer named Paparazzo, the eponym of the word
> paparazzi, appeared in which 1960 Federico Fellini film?
 
La dolce vita
 
> 5 Ali Bhutto and his daughter Benazir are former Prime Ministers of
> which country?
 
Pakistan
 
> 8 Which US President was assassinated in Ford's Theatre, Washington
> D.C.?
 
Abraham Lincoln
 
> 10 Which 1970s British television series starred Tony Curtis and
> Roger Moore as Danny Wilde and Brett Sinclair respectively?
 
In Sweden it was called "Snobbar som jobbar". I will have to admit
that I did not pay attention to the English title.
Bruce Bowler <bruce.bowler@gmail.com>: Sep 18 07:15PM

On Tue, 17 Sep 2019 19:03:16 -0700, Calvin wrote:
 
> 1 What literary character had an affair with Daisy Buchanan?
 
Gatsby
 
> 2 There are countless variations, but what specific ingredient is
always
> present in the Spanish dish paella?
 
Rice
 
> 5 Ali Bhutto and his daughter Benazir are former Prime Ministers of
> which country?
 
Pakistan
 
> 6 The 1963 movie A Shot in the Dark was the second in which film
> franchise established by Blake Edwards?
 
Pink Panther
 
> 7 Robin Williams and Gene Hackman co-starred in the 1996 re-make of
a
> 1978 Franco-Italian comedy. Name either film.
 
La Cage Au Folles; the Bird Cage
 
> 8 Which US President was assassinated in Ford's Theatre, Washington
> D.C.?
 
Abraham Lincoln
Pete Gayde <pagrsg@wowway.com>: Sep 18 07:26PM

Calvin <334152@gmail.com> wrote in
 
> 1 What literary character had an affair with Daisy Buchanan?
 
Gatsby
 
> 2 There are countless variations, but what specific ingredient is
> always present in the Spanish dish paella?
 
Rice
 
> 3 A popular internet
> meme features the celebrity pet Tardar Sauce. What is the creature's
> (and the meme's) more common name?
 
Grumpy Cat
 
> Federico Fellini film?
> 5 Ali Bhutto and his daughter Benazir are
> former Prime Ministers of which country?
 
Pakistan
 
> 6 The 1963 movie A Shot
> in the Dark was the second in which film franchise established by
> Blake Edwards?
 
Pink Panther
 
> 1996 re-make of a 1978 Franco-Italian comedy. Name either film.
> 8 Which US President was assassinated in Ford's Theatre, Washington
> D.C.?
 
Lincoln
 
> respectively?
 
> cheers,
> calvin
 
Pete Gayde
Dan Tilque <dtilque@frontier.com>: Sep 18 04:21PM -0700

On 9/17/19 7:03 PM, Calvin wrote:
> 3 A popular internet meme features the celebrity pet Tardar Sauce. What is the creature's (and the meme's) more common name?
> 4 A news photographer named Paparazzo, the eponym of the word paparazzi, appeared in which 1960 Federico Fellini film?
> 5 Ali Bhutto and his daughter Benazir are former Prime Ministers of which country?
 
Pakistan
 
> 6 The 1963 movie A Shot in the Dark was the second in which film franchise established by Blake Edwards?
 
The Pink Pather
 
> 7 Robin Williams and Gene Hackman co-starred in the 1996 re-make of a 1978 Franco-Italian comedy. Name either film.
> 8 Which US President was assassinated in Ford's Theatre, Washington D.C.?
 
Lincoln
 
 
--
Dan Tilque
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Sep 18 06:42PM -0500

Erland Sommarskog:
> In Sweden it was called "Snobbar som jobbar". I will have to admit
> that I did not pay attention to the English title.
 
For what it's worth, according to the IMDB, the English title of
"Snobbar som jobbar" was "The Persuaders!"
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "Show that 17x17 = 289. Generalise this result."
msb@vex.net | -- Carl E. Linderholm
Pete Gayde <pagrsg@wowway.com>: Sep 18 07:44PM

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote in news:7rednUpqvMzqBR3AnZ2dnUU7-
> release date and describe the movie, and you name it.
 
> 1. 2002: An Oscar-winning American crime comedy-drama musical
> starring Richard Gere and Catherine Zeta Jones.
 
Chicago
 
 
> 2. 2007: A musical romantic comedy starring John Travolta, based
> on a 2002 Broadway musical, which was based in turn on a 1988
> John Waters movie.
 
Hairspray
 
> is about a widowed, 37-year-old, Italian-American woman who
> falls in love with her fiance's estranged, hot-tempered younger
> brother.
 
Moonstruck
 
 
> 5. 2017: An Oscar-winning science-fiction romance written and
> directed by Guillermo del Toro.
 
The Shape of Water
 
> acting as a nanny for 5 children.
 
> 7. 1984: This police movie starring Steve Guttenberg and Kim
> Cattrall would spawn 6 sequels.
 
Police Story
 
 
> 9. 1997: A drama starring Robin Williams and Matt Damon, which tells
> the story of a South Boston janitor who is an unrecognized
> genius.
 
Good Will Hunting
 
> and Independence Day on July 26, the latter to commemorate
> the rejection in 1581 of the rule of King Philip II.
> Name that country.
 
Portugal
 
 
> A2. On 1865-07-26, Wellington was declared the capital of
> New Zealand. What city was the previous capital?
 
Auckland; Napier
 
> wrote an editorial titled "Who Breaks a Butterfly on
> a Wheel?" The line is from Alexander Pope, but what was
> the *subject* of the editorial?
 
Death of Brian Jones
 
> uvf 1967 neerfg. Lrnef yngre, ba ure nyohz Oebxra Ratyvfu,
> gur pnhfgvp fbat Jul'q Lbh Qb Vg? jnf haqrefgbbq gb or
> qverpgrq ng uvz sbe orvat n onq oblsevraq. Anzr ure.
 
Marianne Faithful
 
 
> * C. "Honest Ed" Mirvish (born 1914-07-24)
 
> C1. Every year from 1987 until the store's demolition, Honest
> Ed's had a Christmas season giveaway of 10,000 what?
 
Toasters
 
 
> C2. In 1993, Ed and his theatrically-minded son David opened
> the Princess of Wales Theatre in Toronto's King St. theater
> district. What mega-musical opened the joint?
 
Cats; Phantom of the Opera
 
 
> D1. On 1983-07-24, a game-winning home run was wiped away in
> what was known as "the pine tar incident". Name the player
> who was accused of doctoring his bat.
 
George Brett
 
> striking out more than 100 batters -- and he then extended
> it to 24 seasons in 1993, for a new unbeatable record.
> Name him.
 
Nolan Ryan
 
 
> E1. On 2013-07-24, a high-speed train in Europe approached an
> 80 km/h curve at 190 km/h, and the resulting derailment
> killed 78 people. In which country did this disaster occur?
 
Spain
 
 
> E2. On 2005-07-26, a natural disaster occurred in Mumbai,
> eventually killing more than 5,000 people. What was it?
 
Tsunami
 
 
> F2. This author, born on 1894-07-26, wrote more than 50 books.
> One of them, "The Doors of Perception", inspired the name
> of the band the Doors. Name him.
 
Jack London
 
 
Pete Gayde
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