Sunday, September 24, 2017

Digest for rec.games.trivia@googlegroups.com - 2 updates in 2 topics

Pete Gayde <pagrsg@wowway.com>: Sep 24 03:59AM

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote in news:uPydnbBcZ4aqjVnEnZ2dnUU7-
 
> A1. This US snowboarder is a 2-time Olympic gold-medalist (2006
> and 2010), and holds the record for the most X Games gold
> medals with 13.
 
Shaun Johnson
 
> the mega-brewery.
 
> C1. Toronto brewery Mill Street was taken over by which much
> larger brewer in the fall of 2015?
 
Molson; Labatts
 
> as Maximus and Hop Stoopid) sold 50% of the company in
> 2015 for an estimated $500,000,000 US to which European
> mega-brewer?
 
Heineken
 
> acquisition of Goose Island in 2011. As a result of
> subsequent mergers, that company is now the largest brewer
> in the world. Name the mega-brewery.
 
AB InBev
 
 
> D1. See: <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/GFR10/canal1.jpg>.
> Name this Belgian city, often referred to as the "Venice
> of the North".
 
Brugges
 
> this rapper acquired legendary status with his graphic
> accounts of ghetto life and East Coast / West Coast feuds.
> He was shot dead in Las Vegas in 1996.
 
Tupac Shakur
 
> by adding real instruments and writing sophisticated lyrics.
> They are currently the house band for NBC's "Late Night
> with Jimmy Fallon".
 
The Roots
 
 
> F3. "Many years later, as he faced the firing squad, Colonel
> Aureliano Buendía was to remember that distant afternoon
> when his father took him to discover ice."
 
Pete Gayde
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Sep 23 02:09PM -0500

Peter Smyth:
> And as far as I can tell there has never been a hockey player called Eric
> Johnson (although there is an Erik Johnson).
 
Oops. But at least that one doesn't affect any scoring.
--
Mark Brader "Great things are not done by those
Toronto who sit down and count the cost
msb@vex.net of every thought and act." --Daniel Gooch
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Saturday, September 23, 2017

Digest for rec.games.trivia@googlegroups.com - 6 updates in 2 topics

Joshua Kreitzer <gromit82@hotmail.com>: Sep 23 01:44AM

I am requesting that an additional answer be accepted, and this would
affect not only me but Dan Blum and Marc Dashevsky.
 
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote in news:Rf-dnavX8v98klnEnZ2dnUU7-
 
>> In each case name the sport played by all four.
 
>> 10. Jack Johnson, Mike Johnson, Chad Johnson, Eric Johnson.
 
> Hockey.
 
Dan, Marc, and I all had football or American football as our answer or
one of our answers. While there have been hockey players with each of
these names, there have also been American football players in the NFL
with each of these names as well. (Note that the question doesn't
specify that the players have to be current players.)
 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Johnson_(tackle)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Johnson_(defensive_back)
 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mike_Johnson_(cornerback)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mike_Johnson_(linebacker)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mike_Johnson_(offensive_lineman)
 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chad_Johnson
 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eric_Johnson_(tight_end)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eric_Johnson_(defensive_back)
 
My selection of American football as my answer was motivated by Chad
Johnson, the football player who is famous enough that Wikipedia doesn't
need to disambiguate him.
 
--
Joshua Kreitzer
gromit82@hotmail.com
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Sep 23 01:33AM -0500

Mark Brader:
>>> In each case name the sport played by all four.
>>> 10. Jack Johnson, Mike Johnson, Chad Johnson, Eric Johnson.
 
>> Hockey.

Joshua Kreitzer:
> these names, there have also been American football players in the NFL
> with each of these names as well. (Note that the question doesn't
> specify that the players have to be current players.)
 
Protest accepted. 4 for Marc and Joshua. 2 for Dan Blum.
 
 
Scores, if there are now no errors:
 
FINAL ROUNDS-> 2 3 4 6 7 8 9 BEST
TOPICS-> Can Sci Ent Geo His Lit Spo FIVE
Dan Blum 4 36 32 29 48 28 13 173
Stephen Perry -- 52 56 60 -- -- -- 168
Joshua Kreitzer 12 16 44 43 28 24 22 161
Marc Dashevsky 12 40 -- 28 24 24 24 140
Dan Tilque 4 28 4 32 32 12 0 108
Peter Smyth -- 16 20 32 12 -- 12 92
Erland Sommarskog -- 8 -- 32 27 -- 8 75
"Calvin" -- 8 -- 35 14 -- -- 57
Pete Gayde 3 0 20 -- -- -- 24 47
Gareth Owen -- -- 40 -- -- -- -- 40
Jason Kreitzer -- 0 28 -- -- -- 8 36
 
--
Mark Brader | I rise to speak ... well, actually, I don't rise,
Toronto | nor do I speak, but I lounge to type in his defense.
msb@vex.net | -- Bob Lipton
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
"Peter Smyth" <smythp@gmail.com>: Sep 23 09:30AM

Joshua Kreitzer wrote:
 
 
> My selection of American football as my answer was motivated by Chad
> Johnson, the football player who is famous enough that Wikipedia doesn't
> need to disambiguate him.
 
And as far as I can tell there has never been a hockey player called Eric
Johnson (although there is an Erik Johnson).
 
Peter Smyth
swp <stephen.w.perry@gmail.com>: Sep 22 03:53PM -0700

On Thursday, September 21, 2017 at 3:17:16 PM UTC-4, Mark Brader wrote:
> These questions were written to be asked in Toronto on 2017-04-04,
> and should be interpreted accordingly.
 
noted
 
 
> A1. This US snowboarder is a 2-time Olympic gold-medalist (2006
> and 2010), and holds the record for the most X Games gold
> medals with 13.
 
shaun white
 
> A2. This Canadian snowboarder won gold at the 1998 Winter
> Olympics has founded of a company selling branded medical
> marijuana.
 
he's like, just this guy ya know?
 
> A3. This Canadian snowboarder and Olympic hopeful was seriously
> injured in March during a back-country excursion.
 
mcmorris?
 
 
> Administered by the Baltimore-based Lieber Research
> Institute, it rewards innovative research in which
> discipline?
 
neuroscience
 
> B2. The Lemelson-MIT Prize honors mid-career individuals for
> achievements in what?
 
innovation in technology
 
> B3. Named after Canadian academic J.C. Fields, the Fields Medal
> is awarded every 4 years and is one of the most prestigious
> awards in what discipline?
 
mathematics
 
> the mega-brewery.
 
> C1. Toronto brewery Mill Street was taken over by which much
> larger brewer in the fall of 2015?
 
anheuser–busch
 
> as Maximus and Hop Stoopid) sold 50% of the company in
> 2015 for an estimated $500,000,000 US to which European
> mega-brewer?
 
heinekin
 
> acquisition of Goose Island in 2011. As a result of
> subsequent mergers, that company is now the largest brewer
> in the world. Name the mega-brewery.
 
anheuser–busch
 
 
> D1. See: <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/GFR10/canal1.jpg>.
> Name this Belgian city, often referred to as the "Venice
> of the North".
 
amsterdam
 
> D2. See: <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/GFR10/canal2.jpg>.
> Similarly, this western Indian city in Rajasthan Province
> has been called the "Venice of the East".
 
alleppey
 
> D3. See: <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/GFR10/canal3.jpg>.
> And this Atlantic port city of rivers, islands, and over
> 50 bridges is often called the "Brazilian Venice".
 
recife
 
> this rapper acquired legendary status with his graphic
> accounts of ghetto life and East Coast / West Coast feuds.
> He was shot dead in Las Vegas in 1996.
 
tupac shakur
 
> of the 1980s. The group became known for their emphatic
> politics and for contributing an iconic song to Spike Lee's
> movie "Do the Right Thing".
 
public enemy ("fight the power")
 
> by adding real instruments and writing sophisticated lyrics.
> They are currently the house band for NBC's "Late Night
> with Jimmy Fallon".
 
the roots
 
 
> F1. "It was a queer, sultry summer, the summer they electrocuted
> the Rosenbergs, and I didn't know what I was doing in
> New York."
 
the bell jar
 
> F2. "They're out there. Black boys in white suits up before
> me to commit sex acts in the hall and get it mopped up
> before I can catch them."
 
a clockwork orange
 
> F3. "Many years later, as he faced the firing squad, Colonel
> Aureliano Buendía was to remember that distant afternoon
> when his father took him to discover ice."
 
100 years of solitude
 
 
swp
 
if you can, please help
http://www.redcross.org/about-us/our-work/disaster-relief/hurricane-relief/hurricane-irma-relief-information
Joshua Kreitzer <gromit82@hotmail.com>: Sep 23 01:34AM

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote in news:uPydnbBcZ4aqjVnEnZ2dnUU7-
 
> B3. Named after Canadian academic J.C. Fields, the Fields Medal
> is awarded every 4 years and is one of the most prestigious
> awards in what discipline?
 
mathematics

> as Maximus and Hop Stoopid) sold 50% of the company in
> 2015 for an estimated $500,000,000 US to which European
> mega-brewer?
 
InBev Anheuser Busch
 
> acquisition of Goose Island in 2011. As a result of
> subsequent mergers, that company is now the largest brewer
> in the world. Name the mega-brewery.
 
InBev Anheuser Busch

> this rapper acquired legendary status with his graphic
> accounts of ghetto life and East Coast / West Coast feuds.
> He was shot dead in Las Vegas in 1996.
 
Tupac Shakur

> of the 1980s. The group became known for their emphatic
> politics and for contributing an iconic song to Spike Lee's
> movie "Do the Right Thing".
 
Public Enemy
 
> by adding real instruments and writing sophisticated lyrics.
> They are currently the house band for NBC's "Late Night
> with Jimmy Fallon".
 
The Roots

 
> F3. "Many years later, as he faced the firing squad, Colonel
> Aureliano Buendía was to remember that distant afternoon
> when his father took him to discover ice."
 
"One Hundred Years of Solitude"
 
--
Joshua Kreitzer
gromit82@hotmail.com
"Peter Smyth" <smythp@gmail.com>: Sep 23 09:29AM

Mark Brader wrote:
 
 
> A1. This US snowboarder is a 2-time Olympic gold-medalist (2006
> and 2010), and holds the record for the most X Games gold
> medals with 13.
Shaun White
 
> B3. Named after Canadian academic J.C. Fields, the Fields Medal
> is awarded every 4 years and is one of the most prestigious
> awards in what discipline?
Mathematics
> this rapper acquired legendary status with his graphic
> accounts of ghetto life and East Coast / West Coast feuds.
> He was shot dead in Las Vegas in 1996.
Tupac Shakur, Notorious BIG
> of the 1980s. The group became known for their emphatic
> politics and for contributing an iconic song to Spike Lee's
> movie "Do the Right Thing".
Public Enemy
 
> F3. "Many years later, as he faced the firing squad, Colonel
> Aureliano Buendía was to remember that distant afternoon
> when his father took him to discover ice."
 
 
Peter Smyth
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Friday, September 22, 2017

Digest for rec.games.trivia@googlegroups.com - 15 updates in 6 topics

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Sep 21 02:17PM -0500

These questions were written to be asked in Toronto on 2017-04-04,
and should be interpreted accordingly.
 
On each question you may give up to two answers, but if you give
both a right answer and a wrong answer, there is a small penalty.
Please post all your answers to the newsgroup in a single followup,
based only on your own knowledge. (In your answer posting, quote
the questions and place your answer below each one.) I will reveal
the correct answers in about 3 days.
 
All questions were written by members of 5 Easy Pieces and are
used here by permission, but have been reformatted and may have
been retyped and/or edited by me. For further information see
my 2016-11-26 companion posting on "Questions from the Canadian
Inquisition (QFTCI*)".
 
 
** Final, Round 10 - Challenge Round
 
* A. Snowboarders
 
In each case, name the snowboard champion.
 
A1. This US snowboarder is a 2-time Olympic gold-medalist (2006
and 2010), and holds the record for the most X Games gold
medals with 13.
 
A2. This Canadian snowboarder won gold at the 1998 Winter
Olympics has founded of a company selling branded medical
marijuana.
 
A3. This Canadian snowboarder and Olympic hopeful was seriously
injured in March during a back-country excursion.
 
 
* B. Science Prizes
 
Many lucrative prizes are awarded internationally in the sciences.
We give you a clue and name the prize; you identify the *scientific
discipline or activity* that it recognizes.
 
B1. The Constance Lieber Prize is awarded every 2 years.
Administered by the Baltimore-based Lieber Research
Institute, it rewards innovative research in which
discipline?
 
B2. The Lemelson-MIT Prize honors mid-career individuals for
achievements in what?
 
B3. Named after Canadian academic J.C. Fields, the Fields Medal
is awarded every 4 years and is one of the most prestigious
awards in what discipline?
 
 
* C. Mega-Brewery Purchases
 
These question are about transactions where a mega-brewery took
on a stake in a successful craft brewery. In each case, name
the mega-brewery.
 
C1. Toronto brewery Mill Street was taken over by which much
larger brewer in the fall of 2015?
 
C2. California-based brewery Lagunitas (known for such beers
as Maximus and Hop Stoopid) sold 50% of the company in
2015 for an estimated $500,000,000 US to which European
mega-brewer?
 
C3. The first major purchase of a craft brewer was the
acquisition of Goose Island in 2011. As a result of
subsequent mergers, that company is now the largest brewer
in the world. Name the mega-brewery.
 
 
* D. It's Not Venice
 
Many cities other than Venice have their own canals and watery
areas. From the photo and clue, name the picturesque city.
 
D1. See: <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/GFR10/canal1.jpg>.
Name this Belgian city, often referred to as the "Venice
of the North".
 
D2. See: <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/GFR10/canal2.jpg>.
Similarly, this western Indian city in Rajasthan Province
has been called the "Venice of the East".
 
D3. See: <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/GFR10/canal3.jpg>.
And this Atlantic port city of rivers, islands, and over
50 bridges is often called the "Brazilian Venice".
 
 
* E. Hip-Hop History
 
It's been 44 years since hip-hop emerged from the South Bronx at
parties arranged by DJ Kool Herc. That means it has now had as
long a history of influence as rock 'n roll had had in the 1990s.
 
E1. Son of a Black Panther mother in jail on bombing charges,
this rapper acquired legendary status with his graphic
accounts of ghetto life and East Coast / West Coast feuds.
He was shot dead in Las Vegas in 1996.
 
E2. This crew was a leader in the socially conscious rap movement
of the 1980s. The group became known for their emphatic
politics and for contributing an iconic song to Spike Lee's
movie "Do the Right Thing".
 
E3. This Philadelphia group, formed in 1987, broke new ground
by adding real instruments and writing sophisticated lyrics.
They are currently the house band for NBC's "Late Night
with Jimmy Fallon".
 
 
* F. 1960s Novels
 
We give you the opening line; you name the novel written in
the 1960s.
 
F1. "It was a queer, sultry summer, the summer they electrocuted
the Rosenbergs, and I didn't know what I was doing in
New York."
 
F2. "They're out there. Black boys in white suits up before
me to commit sex acts in the hall and get it mopped up
before I can catch them."
 
F3. "Many years later, as he faced the firing squad, Colonel
Aureliano Buendía was to remember that distant afternoon
when his father took him to discover ice."
 
--
Mark Brader | "... [A]toms and universes are the same. All the
Toronto | world is recursive, and that's why we never
msb@vex.net | know where to begin." -- Charles Goldfarb
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
Gareth Owen <gwowen@gmail.com>: Sep 21 08:45PM +0100

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader) writes:
 
Given this groups overall hip-hop knowledge, I feel I should chip in
with these.
 
> this rapper acquired legendary status with his graphic
> accounts of ghetto life and East Coast / West Coast feuds.
> He was shot dead in Las Vegas in 1996.
 
Tupac Shakur
 
> of the 1980s. The group became known for their emphatic
> politics and for contributing an iconic song to Spike Lee's
> movie "Do the Right Thing".
 
Public Enemy
 
> by adding real instruments and writing sophisticated lyrics.
> They are currently the house band for NBC's "Late Night
> with Jimmy Fallon".
 
The Roots
Erland Sommarskog <esquel@sommarskog.se>: Sep 21 11:08PM +0200

> C1. Toronto brewery Mill Street was taken over by which much
> larger brewer in the fall of 2015?
 
Budweiser

> as Maximus and Hop Stoopid) sold 50% of the company in
> 2015 for an estimated $500,000,000 US to which European
> mega-brewer?
 
Heiniken

> acquisition of Goose Island in 2011. As a result of
> subsequent mergers, that company is now the largest brewer
> in the world. Name the mega-brewery.
 
Carlsberg

> D1. See: <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/GFR10/canal1.jpg>.
> Name this Belgian city, often referred to as the "Venice
> of the North".
 
Brugge

> D2. See: <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/GFR10/canal2.jpg>.
> Similarly, this western Indian city in Rajasthan Province
> has been called the "Venice of the East".
 
Agra
 
> D3. See: <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/GFR10/canal3.jpg>.
> And this Atlantic port city of rivers, islands, and over
> 50 bridges is often called the "Brazilian Venice".
 
Porto Alegro

 
 
 
--
Erland Sommarskog, Stockholm, esquel@sommarskog.se
tool@panix.com (Dan Blum): Sep 21 10:19PM

> Administered by the Baltimore-based Lieber Research
> Institute, it rewards innovative research in which
> discipline?
 
biology; medicine
 
> B2. The Lemelson-MIT Prize honors mid-career individuals for
> achievements in what?
 
computer science; economics
 
> B3. Named after Canadian academic J.C. Fields, the Fields Medal
> is awarded every 4 years and is one of the most prestigious
> awards in what discipline?
 
mathematics
 
> * C. Mega-Brewery Purchases
 
> C1. Toronto brewery Mill Street was taken over by which much
> larger brewer in the fall of 2015?
 
Coors; Anheuser-Busch
 
> as Maximus and Hop Stoopid) sold 50% of the company in
> 2015 for an estimated $500,000,000 US to which European
> mega-brewer?
 
Heineken
 
> acquisition of Goose Island in 2011. As a result of
> subsequent mergers, that company is now the largest brewer
> in the world. Name the mega-brewery.
 
Anheuser-Busch
 
 
> D1. See: <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/GFR10/canal1.jpg>.
> Name this Belgian city, often referred to as the "Venice
> of the North".
 
Bruges
 
 
> this rapper acquired legendary status with his graphic
> accounts of ghetto life and East Coast / West Coast feuds.
> He was shot dead in Las Vegas in 1996.
 
Tupac
 
> of the 1980s. The group became known for their emphatic
> politics and for contributing an iconic song to Spike Lee's
> movie "Do the Right Thing".
 
Public Enemy
 
 
 
> F3. "Many years later, as he faced the firing squad, Colonel
> Aureliano Buend?a was to remember that distant afternoon
> when his father took him to discover ice."
 
One Hundred Years of Solitude
 
--
_______________________________________________________________________
Dan Blum tool@panix.com
"I wouldn't have believed it myself if I hadn't just made it up."
Marc Dashevsky <usenet@MarcDashevsky.com>: Sep 21 05:23PM -0500

In article <uPydnbBcZ4aqjVnEnZ2dnUU7-XnNnZ2d@giganews.com>, msb@vex.net says...
 
> D1. See: <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/GFR10/canal1.jpg>.
> Name this Belgian city, often referred to as the "Venice
> of the North".
Bruges
 
> this rapper acquired legendary status with his graphic
> accounts of ghetto life and East Coast / West Coast feuds.
> He was shot dead in Las Vegas in 1996.
Tupac Shakur
 
> of the 1980s. The group became known for their emphatic
> politics and for contributing an iconic song to Spike Lee's
> movie "Do the Right Thing".
Public Enemy
 
 
> F2. "They're out there. Black boys in white suits up before
> me to commit sex acts in the hall and get it mopped up
> before I can catch them."
One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest
 
> F3. "Many years later, as he faced the firing squad, Colonel
> Aureliano Buendía was to remember that distant afternoon
> when his father took him to discover ice."
100 Years of Solitude
 
 
--
Replace "usenet" with "marc" in the e-mail address.
 
---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com
Jason Kreitzer <jk71875@gmail.com>: Sep 21 06:45PM -0700

On Thursday, September 21, 2017 at 3:17:16 PM UTC-4, Mark Brader wrote:
> this rapper acquired legendary status with his graphic
> accounts of ghetto life and East Coast / West Coast feuds.
> He was shot dead in Las Vegas in 1996.
2Pac
> of the 1980s. The group became known for their emphatic
> politics and for contributing an iconic song to Spike Lee's
> movie "Do the Right Thing".
Public Enemy
> by adding real instruments and writing sophisticated lyrics.
> They are currently the house band for NBC's "Late Night
> with Jimmy Fallon".
The Roots
Dan Tilque <dtilque@frontier.com>: Sep 22 03:17AM -0700

Mark Brader wrote:
 
> A1. This US snowboarder is a 2-time Olympic gold-medalist (2006
> and 2010), and holds the record for the most X Games gold
> medals with 13.
 
Shawn White
 
 
> B3. Named after Canadian academic J.C. Fields, the Fields Medal
> is awarded every 4 years and is one of the most prestigious
> awards in what discipline?
 
economics
 
> the mega-brewery.
 
> C1. Toronto brewery Mill Street was taken over by which much
> larger brewer in the fall of 2015?
 
Molson; Labatt
 
> as Maximus and Hop Stoopid) sold 50% of the company in
> 2015 for an estimated $500,000,000 US to which European
> mega-brewer?
 
Heineken
 
> acquisition of Goose Island in 2011. As a result of
> subsequent mergers, that company is now the largest brewer
> in the world. Name the mega-brewery.
 
AB-Inbev
 
 
> D1. See: <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/GFR10/canal1.jpg>.
> Name this Belgian city, often referred to as the "Venice
> of the North".
 
Antwerp
 
> this rapper acquired legendary status with his graphic
> accounts of ghetto life and East Coast / West Coast feuds.
> He was shot dead in Las Vegas in 1996.
 
Tupac
 
 
--
Dan Tilque
tool@panix.com (Dan Blum): Sep 18 04:01AM

This is Rotating Quiz #268. Entries must be posted by Sunday,
September 24th, 2017 at 11 PM (Eastern Daylight Time).
 
Usual rules: no looking anything up, no discussion, etc. The winner
gets to create the next RQ.
 
Please post your answers to all questions in a single followup in the
newsgroup, quoting the questions and placing your answer below each
one. Only one answer is allowed per question.
 
This quiz has a theme which affects the answers but not the
scoring. If the answer is the name of a person who is commonly known
by a personal name and surname, the surname must be provided; if any
other part of the name is provided it must be correct or the answer
will not score. (The same rule applies if the answer contains the
names of multiple people). If the answer is not the name of a person
the entire name of the entity must be provided. Each correct answer is
worth 2 points, or 1 if it's almost correct somehow.
 
In case of a tie, the first tiebreaker will be whoever scored the most
points on the hardest questions (defined post-facto as the ones which
the fewest people got any points on). Second tiebreaker will be
posting order.
 
1. This American comedian hosted a number of similar television shows
at the height of his career, starting with a local Detroit show in
1953. One of his trademarks was a variety of puppet characters such as
White Fang and Pookie the Lion; the other was getting hit in the face
by a pie.
 
2. This American reality show contestant is best known for winning the
first season of Survivor, although he has since appeared on other
shows. More recently he served prison time for tax evasion.
 
3. This alcohol brand, primarily known for bourbon, began in Kentucky
in 1795 although it did not acquire its current name until some time
later. It is currently owned by Suntory Holdings.
 
4. This botanical term refers to edible objects produced by woody
plants; soft <answer 4> includes things such as drupes and (true)
berries, while hard <answer 4> includes things such as acorns.
 
5. This longest-serving American Secretary of State was instrumental
in founding the United Nations, the charter for which was drafted by
him and his staff in 1943. He received the 1945 Nobel Peace Prize for
this and other work.
 
6. This self-proclaimed "King of All Media" was an early "shock jock,"
locally in Washington DC and New York City in the early 1980s and
syndicated nationally from 1986-2005. Since then he has been heard on
SiriusXM and was a judge on America's Got Talent for several seasons.
 
7. This German city is the capital of and largest city in
Schleswig-Holstein. Because of its location on the Baltic Sea it is a
maritime hub. It hosts the <answer 7> Regatta (or <answer 7> week),
the largest sailing event in the world, every June. It was made the
base for the Prussian/German Baltic fleet in 1865 and was the site of
the sailor's mutiny that sparked the revolution that toppled the
Kaiser.
 
8. This English man and American woman were an extremely famous pair
of ballroom dancers and dance teachers in the early 20th century; they
are credited with popularizing numerous dances such as the foxtrot and
the female half of the couple was a major fashion icon. Their career
was cut short by the male half's service in World War I and subsequent
death on a training flight. They are probably best known today for the
1939 movie The Story of <answer 8> which starred Fred Astaire and
Ginger Rogers.
 
9. This fictional American counter-intelligence agent is the
protagonist of 27 novels by Donald Hamilton, beginning with Death of a
Citizen and ending with The Damagers. In the 1960s four movies
ostensibly based on the books were produced, but they were spoofs
starring Dean Martin and had little actual relation to the books.
 
10. This card game was developed from a version of Whist over a number
of iterations in the early 20th century. In its final form it was
extremely popular in the US in the 1930s and 40s, with one survey
indicating that 44% of households played it at some point. While it
declined in popularity after that, it is still played in the US and
many other countries.
 
 
--
_______________________________________________________________________
Dan Blum tool@panix.com
"I wouldn't have believed it myself if I hadn't just made it up."
Bruce Bowler <bbowler@bigelow.org>: Sep 18 02:12PM

On Mon, 18 Sep 2017 04:01:05 +0000, Dan Blum wrote:
 
 
> Usual rules: no looking anything up, no discussion, etc. The winner gets
> to create the next RQ.
 
In the unlikely event I win, I will defer to the next to set the next RQ
 
> One of his trademarks was a variety of puppet characters such as White
> Fang and Pookie the Lion; the other was getting hit in the face by a
> pie.
 
Soupy *Sales*
 
> 2. This American reality show contestant is best known for winning the
> first season of Survivor, although he has since appeared on other shows.
> More recently he served prison time for tax evasion.
 
Richard *Hatch*
 
> 3. This alcohol brand, primarily known for bourbon, began in Kentucky in
> 1795 although it did not acquire its current name until some time later.
> It is currently owned by Suntory Holdings.
 
Jim *Beam*
 
> 4. This botanical term refers to edible objects produced by woody
> plants; soft <answer 4> includes things such as drupes and (true)
> berries, while hard <answer 4> includes things such as acorns.
 
*mast* (was going to say fruit, but that doesn't fit the theme, then it
came to me)
 
> locally in Washington DC and New York City in the early 1980s and
> syndicated nationally from 1986-2005. Since then he has been heard on
> SiriusXM and was a judge on America's Got Talent for several seasons.
 
Howard *Stern*
 
> largest sailing event in the world, every June. It was made the base for
> the Prussian/German Baltic fleet in 1865 and was the site of the
> sailor's mutiny that sparked the revolution that toppled the Kaiser.
 
*Kiel* (guess, based on theme)
 
> ending with The Damagers. In the 1960s four movies ostensibly based on
> the books were produced, but they were spoofs starring Dean Martin and
> had little actual relation to the books.
 
Matt *Helm*
 
> indicating that 44% of households played it at some point. While it
> declined in popularity after that, it is still played in the US and many
> other countries.
 
*bridge*
Dan Tilque <dtilque@frontier.com>: Sep 16 02:34AM -0700

Calvin wrote:
> I'm in New Zealand for the next two weeks so results won't be posted until early October.
 
> 1 What links Brooklyn, Romeo and Harper?
> 2 Brno is a city of around 100,000 people in which European country?
 
Czechia
 
> 3 Which conflict lasted from 17th July 1936 to 1st April 1939?
 
Spanish Civil War
 
> 4 These words from various different languages all have what identical meaning: Gehve, Qahwa, Sourj, Koohii, Kape?
> 5 Which NFL team is sometimes nicknamed "Americas Team"?
 
Dallas Cowboys
 
> 6 Which country has won the most Davis Cups?
 
USA
 
> 7 A piano suite by which French composer (1862-1918) includes the movement 'Clair De Lune'?
> 8 In 1934 which African country became the first to compete in a football (soccer) World Cup?
> 9 Diwali is an important festival in which religion?
 
Sikhism
 
> 10 The Husqvarna manufacturing group is headquartered in which European country?
 
Sweden
 
 
 
--
Dan Tilque
tool@panix.com (Dan Blum): Sep 16 02:22PM


> For the hardest-question tiebrakers, it looks like Dan and I tied there
> too. Which means it goes to the next tiebreaker: who posted first.
> According to my newsreader, Dan's post was before mine.
 
That depends on exactly how he's calculating things. If it's by
summing the other correct answers to the questions then it's a tie
(assuming Erland's answer to c is ignored). If it's by comparing
single hardest question first, then second, etc., you would beat me.
 
--
_______________________________________________________________________
Dan Blum tool@panix.com
"I wouldn't have believed it myself if I hadn't just made it up."
Dan Tilque <dtilque@frontier.com>: Sep 16 01:04AM -0700

Dan Blum wrote:
> his other two correct answers were solos. Only one of mine was, so if
> I were scoring this I would certainly place Marc above me. (Dan Tilque
> would arguably also place above me, but below Marc.)
 
For the hardest-question tiebrakers, it looks like Dan and I tied there
too. Which means it goes to the next tiebreaker: who posted first.
According to my newsreader, Dan's post was before mine.
 
 
--
Dan Tilque
tool@panix.com (Dan Blum): Sep 15 12:11PM


> * African-American Writers
 
> 1. He wrote the novel "Native Son" in 1940 and the memoir
> "Black Boy" in 1945.
 
James Baldwin
 
> 2. She brought "A Raisin in the Sun" to Broadway in 1959.
 
Hansberry
 
> 3. His novel "Invisible Man" won the US National Book Award in 1953.
 
Ralph Ellison
 
> * Booker Prize Winners
 
> 5. "The Comfort of Strangers"; "Atonement"; "Nutshell".
 
Ian McEwan
 
 
 
> 7. See <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/GFR8/art1.jpg>, which is
> "Woman I". This Dutch-American artist was noted for his series
> of Woman paintings such as this one.
 
de Kooning
 
> * Science-Fiction Book Covers
 
> 10. From 1961: http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/GFR8/book1.jpg
 
Stranger in a Strange Land
 
> 11. From 1932: http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/GFR8/book2.jpg
 
Brave New World
 
> 12. From 1960: http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/GFR8/book3.jpg
 
A Canticle for Leibowitz
 
> New York designer heads a company with over $300 million in
> annual revenue. Her first Toronto store opened last year at
> Sherway Gardens.
 
Donna Karan
 
--
_______________________________________________________________________
Dan Blum tool@panix.com
"I wouldn't have believed it myself if I hadn't just made it up."
Dan Tilque <dtilque@frontier.com>: Sep 16 01:14AM -0700

Mark Brader wrote:
> "Black Boy" in 1945.
 
> 2. She brought "A Raisin in the Sun" to Broadway in 1959.
 
> 3. His novel "Invisible Man" won the US National Book Award in 1953.
 
Ralph Ellison
 
 
> * Science-Fiction Book Covers
 
> We give you the year and the cover art; you name the novel.
 
> 10. From 1961: http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/GFR8/book1.jpg
 
Stranger in a Strange Land
 
> 11. From 1932: http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/GFR8/book2.jpg
> 12. From 1960: http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/GFR8/book3.jpg
 
A Canticle for Leibowitz
 
 
--
Dan Tilque
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Sep 21 02:15PM -0500

Mark Brader:
> see my 2016-11-26 companion posting on "Questions from the Canadian
> Inquisition (QFTCI*)".
 
 
> ** Final, Round 9 - Sports
 
In the original game (which was fairly hard as Finals go), this was
the third-easiest round, after current events and the audio round.
 
> professionally, name the tennis star. Note: The nickname we
> give may not be the only one they were known by.
 
> 1. "The Punisher" (1988-2006).
 
Andre Agassi. 4 for Erland.
 
> 2. "The Terminator" (1978-94).
 
Ivan Lendl. 4 for Pete and Marc.
 
> 3. "Ice Man" (1973-83, 1991-93).
 
Bjorn Borg. 4 for Marc and Peter.
 
 
 
> For each of these legendary NHL scoring lines, give the nickname
> that the line was known by.
 
> 4. Buffalo Sabres: Gilbert Perrault, Rick Martin, Rene Robert.
 
The French Connection. (Played together 1972-79.) 4 for Pete.
 
> 5. Detroit Red Wings: Ted Lindsay, Sid Abel, Gordie Howe.
 
The Production Line. (Played together 1947-52.) 4 for Pete.
 
> 6. Toronto Maple Leafs: Harvey "Busher" Jackson, Joe Primeau,
> Charlie Conacher.
 
The Kid Line. (Played together 1929-36.)
 
 
> Full names are required, i.e. answers are at least 3 words each.
 
> 7. 1960s/70s NBA point guard Hall of Famer, one of the greatest
> players of his era; and the author of the "Deptford Trilogy".
 
Oscar Robertson Davies. 3 for Dan Blum.
 
> 8. San Jose Sharks center who got his 1,000th career assist this
> year; and the Pulitzer-winning playwright of "Our Town".
 
Joe Thornton Wilder.
 
> 9. Australian golfer who was the runner up in eight "majors";
> and the late, crusty author of "Tough Guys Don't Dance".
 
Greg Norman Mailer. 4 for Pete, Dan Blum, Marc, Peter, Jason,
and Joshua.
 
 
> * Player Lists
 
> In each case name the sport played by all four.
 
> 10. Jack Johnson, Mike Johnson, Chad Johnson, Eric Johnson.
 
Hockey.
 
> 11. Ricky Hatton, Bernard Hopkins, Peter Quillan, Roy Jones.
 
Boxing. 4 for Peter and Joshua.
 
> 12. Adam Loewen, Justin Morneau, John Axford, Eric Gagne.
 
Baseball. 4 for Pete, Marc, and Joshua.
 
 
> sells its naming rights to a corporation. We name the stadium
> and provide a picture; you just name the city where it is.
 
> 13. Rogers Place: <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/GFR9/arena1.jpg>
 
Edmonton. 2 for Joshua.
 
The Rogers company is named after Ted Rogers Sr., a Toronto man who
invented the first radio that could be powered by plugging it into
a regular AC socket. Earlier designs required battery power because
the AC created interference.
 
> 14. Rogers Arena: <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/GFR9/arena2.jpg>
 
Vancouver. 4 for Erland.
 
> 15. TD Garden: <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/GFR9/arena3.jpg>
 
Boston. 4 for Pete, Dan Blum, Marc, Jason, and Joshua.
 
"TD", as they apparently would like Americans not to know, is the
Toronto-Dominion Bank, so named from the 1955 merger of the Bank of
Toronto and the Dominion Bank.
 
 
Scores, if there are no errors:
 
FINAL ROUNDS-> 2 3 4 6 7 8 9 BEST
TOPICS-> Can Sci Ent Geo His Lit Spo FIVE
Dan Blum 4 36 32 29 48 28 11 173
Stephen Perry -- 52 56 60 -- -- -- 168
Joshua Kreitzer 12 16 44 43 28 24 18 157
Marc Dashevsky 12 40 -- 28 24 24 20 136
Dan Tilque 4 28 4 32 32 12 0 108
Peter Smyth -- 16 20 32 12 -- 12 92
Erland Sommarskog -- 8 -- 32 27 -- 8 75
"Calvin" -- 8 -- 35 14 -- -- 57
Pete Gayde 3 0 20 -- -- -- 24 47
Gareth Owen -- -- 40 -- -- -- -- 40
Jason Kreitzer -- 0 28 -- -- -- 8 36
 
--
Mark Brader "...there are other means of persuasion
msb@vex.net besides killing and threatening to kill."
Toronto --Dashiell Hammett, The Maltese Falcon
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
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Thursday, September 21, 2017

Digest for rec.games.trivia@googlegroups.com - 2 updates in 1 topic

swp <stephen.w.perry@gmail.com>: Sep 20 04:48AM -0700

On Wednesday, September 20, 2017 at 2:57:46 AM UTC-4, Mark Brader wrote:
> that wording ever since Game 10, Rounds 7-8, which it actually
> applied to.
 
> Please read it as "3 days".
 
 
so that's why the answers have been posted before I entered for so many of these....
 
swp
Dan Tilque <dtilque@frontier.com>: Sep 21 02:46AM -0700

Mark Brader wrote:
> give may not be the only one they were known by.
 
> 1. "The Punisher" (1988-2006).
> 2. "The Terminator" (1978-94).
 
McEnroe
 
> 3. "Ice Man" (1973-83, 1991-93).
 
Nastase
 
> players of his era; and the author of the "Deptford Trilogy".
 
> 8. San Jose Sharks center who got his 1,000th career assist this
> year; and the Pulitzer-winning playwright of "Our Town".
 
Billy Thornton Wilder (total WAG for the first name)
 
 
> * Player Lists
 
> In each case name the sport played by all four.
 
> 10. Jack Johnson, Mike Johnson, Chad Johnson, Eric Johnson.
 
Baseball
 
> 11. Ricky Hatton, Bernard Hopkins, Peter Quillan, Roy Jones.
 
Hockey
 
> 12. Adam Loewen, Justin Morneau, John Axford, Eric Gagne.
 
Hockey
 
 
> 13. Rogers Place: <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/GFR9/arena1.jpg>
> 14. Rogers Arena: <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/GFR9/arena2.jpg>
> 15. TD Garden: <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/GFR9/arena3.jpg>
 
San Jose
 
 
--
Dan Tilque
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