Tuesday, December 11, 2018

Digest for rec.games.trivia@googlegroups.com - 8 updates in 3 topics

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Dec 10 03:56AM -0600

Mark Brader:
> skilled gunfighter during his time with the Wild Bunch and the
> Hole-in-the-Wall Gang, but you probably know him better by a
> different soubriquet. What's that?
 
Sundance Kid. 4 for Dan Blum, Calvin, and Pete. 3 for Joshua.
 
> he was simply paying initial investors with the investments
> of later investors -- and pocketing a large share for himself.
> This type of con is now named after him. What's his name?
 
Charles Ponzi. 4 for everyone -- Dan Blum, Erland, Calvin, Joshua,
Pete, and Dan Tilque.
 
> being hired by other crime syndicates to assassinate whoever
> the gangs thought needed killing. The group was responsible
> for as many as 1,000 contract killings. What was it called?
 
Murder Inc. 4 for Dan Blum, Joshua, and Dan Tilque.
 
> Las Vegas. Legend has it that the reason he was whacked by
> the Mob in 1947 was because he spent too much money upgrading
> the Flamingo Hotel to his high standard. Who is #15?
 
Bugsy Siegel. 4 for Dan Blum, Joshua, and Dan Tilque.
 
A much shorter version of this question, with the man's initials
given rather than his photo, was a $1,600 question on "Jeopardy!"
on 2018-11-23.
 
> is also somewhere on the handout. Which number is he? *Hint*:
> his handout picture was taken when he was 24, about 6 months
> before he and Bonnie were killed.
 
#4. 3 for Calvin. 2 for Dan Blum and Joshua.
 
> 6. Jesse James was one of the most successful Wild West outlaws,
> committing a large number of train robberies before being killed
> by Robert Ford in 1882.
 
#8. 4 for Dan Blum. 3 for Calvin. 2 for Joshua.
 
> 7. Lucky Luciano was the first boss of the Genovese crime family
> and is considered the father of modern American organized crime.
 
#3. 4 for Pete. 3 for Calvin.
 
> 8. John Dillinger was the second man to be named Public Enemy #1;
> he robbed 24 banks and four police stations, and escaped from
> jail twice.
 
#5. 4 for Pete. 2 for Joshua.
 
> of dollars, but many of the details of that confession -- such
> as the now-legendary "Murder Hotel", designed to let him kill
> guests in their sleep -- were fabricated, or very likely so.
 
#16. 4 for Dan Blum. 3 for Joshua.
 
> 10. Charles "Pretty Boy" Floyd was named Public Enemy #1 after
> Dillinger was shot to death by federal agents in 1934; Floyd was
> killed by the FBI less than 6 months later. Which number is he?
 
#14. 3 for Dan Blum. 2 for Joshua and Pete.
 
> And if you like, decode the rot13 to see who the 7 decoys were,
> and give their photo numbers for fun, but for no points.
 
Nobody tried these.
 
> 11. Butch Cassidy.
 
#13.
 
> 12. Ma Barker.
 
#2.
 
> 13. Machine Gun Kelly.
 
#17.
 
> 14. Meyer Lansky.
 
#7.
 
> 15. Al Capone.
 
#18.
 
> 16. John Wesley Hardin.
 
#10.
 
> 17. Bumpy Johnson.
 
#6.
 
 
> horizontally from back to front across the larynx, these vibrate,
> modulating the flow of air being expelled from the lungs during
> phonation. What are they?
 
Vocal cords (or folds). 4 for Dan Blum, Erland, Joshua, Pete,
and Dan Tilque.
 
Spelling not: they're *cords*! A "chord" is a musical sound.
 
> It also performs an important function in respiration: as it
> contracts, the volume of the thoracic cavity increases and air
> is drawn into the lungs. Name it.
 
Diaphragm. 4 for Dan Blum, Joshua, Pete, and Dan Tilque.
 
> cartilages of the larynx. A consonantal sound or "stop", common
> in many languages, is produced by obstructing airflow across it.
> What is this opening called? Exact answer required.
 
Glottis. 4 for Dan Blum, Erland, and Joshua.
 
> throat is opened and relaxed by raising the velum, like at
> the beginning of a yawn. The velum also has a different,
> more common, 2-word name. What is it?
 
Soft palate. 4 for Dan Blum and Joshua.
 
> pulsating change of pitch. It is used to add expression to
> vocal and instrumental music. In well-produced singing it occurs
> naturally. Distortions of it are known as a bleat or a wobble.
 
Vibrato. 4 for Dan Blum, Joshua, and Pete.
 
> greater amplitude at specific frequencies. In singing, the
> different areas where this may occur are in the chest, mouth,
> nose, and head. What is this phenomenon called?
 
Resonance. I accepted "sympathetic vibration". 4 for Dan Blum,
Erland, Joshua, and Dan Tilque.
 
> For the purposes of Western classical choral singing, however,
> voices are usually classified into just four categories.
> Name *all four*.
 
Soprano, alto, tenor, bass. 4 for Erland, Joshua, and Pete.
 
The others are baritone (which two people guessed in place of
one of the basic four -- no points for that), mezzo-soprano, and
countertenor.
 
> they reach puberty. The male voice typically deepens an octave,
> while the female voice usually deepens by just a few notes.
> What's it called?
 
Change, break, or mutation of the voice. 4 for Erland.
 
> closure of the <answer 3>, thus emitting a low frequency popping
> or rattling sound. Its use is often criticized, especially
> in women.
 
Vocal fry. 4 for Dan Blum and Joshua.
 
> This tuning allows singers to appear to produce more than one
> pitch at the same time. By what 2-word name is overtone singing
> more commonly known?
 
Throat singing. 4 for Dan Blum.
 
 
Scores, if there are no errors:
 
GAME 10 ROUNDS-> 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 BEST
TOPICS-> Geo Lei Lit Aud Can His Sci FIVE
Dan Blum 20 35 31 13 2 29 32 147
Joshua Kreitzer 24 27 36 26 9 26 32 147
Pete Gayde 19 32 24 30 3 18 16 123
Dan Tilque 20 32 16 4 4 12 12 92
Erland Sommarskog 20 28 8 0 0 4 20 80
"Calvin" -- -- 15 6 0 17 0 38
 
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "I can't tell from this... whether you're
msb@vex.net | a wise man or a wise guy." --Ted Schuerzinger
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
Erland Sommarskog <esquel@sommarskog.se>: Dec 10 11:29PM +0100

>> while the female voice usually deepens by just a few notes.
>> What's it called?
 
> Change, break, or mutation of the voice. 4 for Erland.
 
This question illustrates that while some languages has a word for
something, others has not. I answered in Swedish, since it is a
well-known word in Swedish, but I had no idea what the word coujld
be in English. When I looked it up, I was surprised to find that
there was no word at all, but only an expression.
 
Furthermore, I found that my own answer was not entirely on the mark.
I answered "målbrott", but the dictionary entry was "målbrottet",
that is "'the' målbrott". Normally a dictionary has the indefinite
form of a noun, but this word is only used in definite form.
 
The literal translation of "målbrott" would be "voice break".
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Dec 11 12:52AM -0600

Erland Sommarskog:
> that is "'the' målbrott". Normally a dictionary has the indefinite
> form of a noun, but this word is only used in definite form.
 
> The literal translation of "målbrott" would be "voice break".
 
Doesn't matter. Unless the question is asking for exact wording,
the addition or removal of a leading "the" won't affect your score.
--
Mark Brader "I cannot reply in French, but I will
Toronto type English very slowly and loudly."
msb@vex.net --Lars Eighner
Joshua Kreitzer <gromit82@hotmail.com>: Dec 03 01:38AM

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote in news:_fydnToc8uJgDJ7BnZ2dnUU7-
 
> 1. Swedish: "A Man without Scruples". This American classic was
> published in 1925 and tells the tale of an extremely wealthy
> man who is "unscrupulous" in his romantic pursuits.
 
"The Great Gatsby"
 
> 2. French: "The Best of All Worlds". The content of this dystopian
> novel, published in 1932, is not reflected in the upbeat French
> title.
 
"Brave New World"

> 3. Japanese: "The Angry Raisins". This title is a far cry from
> the actual meaning of this 1939 American classic.
 
"The Grapes of Wrath"
 
> 4. French: "Animals Everywhere!" Not surprisingly, the English
> author was not happy with this translation of his 1945 novel
> and suggested some alternates.
 
"Animal Farm"

> something in translation. The Chinese title bears no resemblance
> to the original title or the plot. Note: we need the title of
> the story itself, not the collection containing it.
 
"Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption"
 
> 6. Italian: "If You Leave Me, I Delete You". This was supposed
> to be a literature round, but a movie seems to have slipped in --
> it stars Jim Carrey and explores lost memories and lost love.
 
"Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind"
 
> 8. Norwegian: "Bridge to the Afterlife". The translated title
> actually serves to spoil the ending of this 1977 Katherine
> Paterson novel about children creating a kingdom of imagination.
 
"Bridge to Terebithia"

> 9. Swedish: "Men Who Hate Women". The original Swedish title of
> Stieg Larsson's first book in his famous trilogy had a remarkably
> different title than the English title you probably recognize.
 
"The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo"
 
> edition of W.P. Kinsella's 1982 novel that was also the source
> for the movie "Field of Dreams". But this time we do need the
> book title.
 
"Shoeless Joe"

> on the 2-page handout:
 
> http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/10-5/fanta.pdf
 
> 1. "Dance of the Hours" by Amilcare Ponchielli.
 
4
 
> 2. "The Rite of Spring" by Igor Stravinsky.
 
10
 
> 3. "The Pines of Rome" by Ottorino Respighi.
 
1; 3
 
> 4. "Carnival of the Animals" by Camille Saint-Saens.
 
12

> Please decode the rot13 for questions #5-8 and in each case,
> name the *composer* of the music for the indicated scene.
 
> 8. Vzntr frira qrcvpgf gur uhfgyr naq ohfgyr bs Arj Lbex Pvgl.
 
Gershwin
 
 
> 9. Frireny bs Orrgubira'f flzcubavrf unir avpxanzrf nf jryy nf
> ahzoref. Gur avagu vzntr vf sebz n fprar fpberq gb bar bs gurz.
> Jung vf gung avpxanzr?
 
"Pastoral Symphony"

> 10. Vzntr svir qrcvpgf gur svany frdhrapr va gur bevtvany "Snagnfvn"
> -- n qrzba njnxravat ng avtug gb jernx unibp. Vg jnf fpberq
> gb n snzbhf cvrpr bs zhfvp ol Zbqrfg Zhffbetfxl. Anzr gur cvrpr.
 
"Night on Bald Mountain"
 
> This time I have no information about the two decoys.
 
#8 is "The Sorcerer's Apprentice" by Paul Dukas.

 
> 1. This synagogue, located at 1700 Bathurst St., is the
> largest Conservative Jewish congregation in North America,
> with approximately 6,000 members. What is its name?
 
Beth Shalom
 
> designed in the Byzantine style, and completed in 1948.
> Which *country*'s Canadian branch of Orthodox Christianity does
> St. Volodymyr's serve?
 
Ukraine
 
> for services in June 1853. An Anglican parish, it is home to the
> oldest congregation in the city. (Hence "Church St."!) Within
> 10 years, when was the parish of St. James first established?
 
1823; 1802
 
> United Church, and later the Church of the Nazarene, before
> bring purchased by *which religious group* that it now serves
> as a temple?
 
Sikhs; Hindus

> 18 months and consists of 24,000 pieces of hand-carved Italian
> carrara marble, Turkish limestone, and Indian pink stone.
> The mandir is a traditional place of worship for *what religion*?
 
Hinduism; Sikhism
 
--
Joshua Kreitzer
gromit82@hotmail.com
Pete Gayde <pagrsg@wowway.com>: Dec 04 12:11AM

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote in news:_fydnToc8uJgDJ7BnZ2dnUU7-
 
> 1. Swedish: "A Man without Scruples". This American classic was
> published in 1925 and tells the tale of an extremely wealthy
> man who is "unscrupulous" in his romantic pursuits.
 
The Great Gatsby
 
 
> 2. French: "The Best of All Worlds". The content of this dystopian
> novel, published in 1932, is not reflected in the upbeat French
> title.
 
Brave New World
 
 
> 3. Japanese: "The Angry Raisins". This title is a far cry from
> the actual meaning of this 1939 American classic.
 
Grapes of Wrath
 
 
> 4. French: "Animals Everywhere!" Not surprisingly, the English
> author was not happy with this translation of his 1945 novel
> and suggested some alternates.
 
Animal Farm
 
> something in translation. The Chinese title bears no resemblance
> to the original title or the plot. Note: we need the title of
> the story itself, not the collection containing it.
 
The Shawshank Redemption
 
 
> 8. Norwegian: "Bridge to the Afterlife". The translated title
> actually serves to spoil the ending of this 1977 Katherine
> Paterson novel about children creating a kingdom of imagination.
 
Bridge to Terabithia
 
 
> http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/10-5/fanta.pdf
 
> Note that all numbers are *below* the illustrations.
 
> 1. "Dance of the Hours" by Amilcare Ponchielli.
 
4
 
> 2. "The Rite of Spring" by Igor Stravinsky.
 
5
 
> 3. "The Pines of Rome" by Ottorino Respighi.
 
3; 12
 
> 4. "Carnival of the Animals" by Camille Saint-Saens.
 
12; 7
 
> name the *composer* of the music for the indicated scene.
 
> 5. Vzntr ahzore fvk vf sebz n fprar jurer Qbanyq Qhpx erranpgf
> gur fgbel bs Abnu'f Nex.
 
Grofe
 
 
> 6. Vzntr bar vf sebz n fprar qrcvpgvat ahzrebhf frdhraprf fpberq
> gb guvf pbzcbfre'f zhfvp.
 
Tchaikovsky
 
 
> 7. Gur frpbaq vzntr vf sebz gur bcravat frdhrapr bs "Snagnfvn",
> juvpu jnf na nofgenpg cvrpr bs navzngvba.
 
J. S. Bach
 
 
> 8. Vzntr frira qrcvpgf gur uhfgyr naq ohfgyr bs Arj Lbex Pvgl.
 
Gershwin
 
 
> 9. Frireny bs Orrgubira'f flzcubavrf unir avpxanzrf nf jryy nf
> ahzoref. Gur avagu vzntr vf sebz n fprar fpberq gb bar bs gurz.
> Jung vf gung avpxanzr?
 
Pastoral
 
 
> 10. Vzntr svir qrcvpgf gur svany frdhrapr va gur bevtvany "Snagnfvn"
> -- n qrzba njnxravat ng avtug gb jernx unibp. Vg jnf fpberq
> gb n snzbhf cvrpr bs zhfvp ol Zbqrfg Zhffbetfxl. Anzr gur cvrpr.
 
Night on Bald Mountain
 
> designed in the Byzantine style, and completed in 1948.
> Which *country*'s Canadian branch of Orthodox Christianity does
> St. Volodymyr's serve?
 
Ukrainian; Russian
 
> for services in June 1853. An Anglican parish, it is home to the
> oldest congregation in the city. (Hence "Church St."!) Within
> 10 years, when was the parish of St. James first established?
 
1740; 1761
 
> 18 months and consists of 24,000 pieces of hand-carved Italian
> carrara marble, Turkish limestone, and Indian pink stone.
> The mandir is a traditional place of worship for *what religion*?
 
Sikh
 
> Jura gung ohvyqvat jnf frireryl qnzntrq ol nabgure sver va 1895,
> gurl erybpngrq gb 630 Fcnqvan Ni., jurer freivprf unir gnxra
> cynpr fvapr 1909. Jung vf vgf anzr?
 
Pete Gayde
tool@panix.com (Dan Blum): Dec 10 02:53PM

> was "Flashdance", which was the third-highest-grossing movie
> of any kind in 1983. In "Flashdance", *who plays Alex Owens*,
> welder by day, exotic dancer by night?
 
Jennifer Beals
 
> the West! Co-starring in the movie, as an American tap dancer
> who has defected to the USSR, was this actor and dancer, who
> died in 2003. Who?
 
Gregory Hines
 
> and "Singin' in the Rain". Film critic Pauline Kael said of her:
> "When she wraps her phenomenal legs around Astaire, she can be
> forgiven everything." By what name is she best known?
 
Cyd Charisse; Ginger Rogers
 
> Irving Berlin, and is perhaps best known for its "cheek-to-cheek"
> dance routine, with Rogers wearing an elaborate ostrich-feather
> dress.
 
Flying Down to Rio
 
> "West Side Story". In this movie, he is prominently featured
> in dance sequences around farm activities like woodchopping
> and raising a barn.
 
Oklahoma
 
> Roy Scheider as an egomaniacal director and choreographer,
> was selected for preservation in the National Film Registry by
> the Library of Congress.
 
All That Jazz
 
> 9. This Australian movie by Baz Luhrmann about the "Pan-Pacific
> Grand Prix Dancing Championship" won the People's Choice award
> at the 1992 Toronto International Film Festival.
 
Moulin Rouge
 
> severe case of this disease -- which helped his colleague,
> Walter Reed, prove that mosquitoes were responsible for
> its spread. Name the disease.
 
yellow fever
 
> resulted in the deaths of an estimated 75-200 million
> people in Europe and Asia, the peak of which was in the
> mid-14th century. What is it commonly known as?
 
Black Death
 
> Award and MVP Award in 1971 and is a six-time All-Star,
> and one of five players to start in the All-Star Game for
> both the American and National Leagues.
 
Vida Blue
 
> California Angels and the Florida Marlins. He is a Gold
> Glove winner and is now working as a batting coach for the
> Buffalo Bisons.
 
Vida Blue
 
 
> C1. This geological formation up to 350 feet (110 m) high forms
> an 8-mile (13 km) section of the Kent coastline in England,
> facing France. What is it called?
 
White Cliffs of Dover
 
> then curves west across Ethiopia and northwest into Sudan,
> a total of at least 900 miles (1,450 km), before becoming
> part of a larger river system. Name this specific river.
 
Blue Nile; White Nile
 
> its distinctive colored feet, which males display in an
> elaborate mating ritual by lifting them up and down while
> strutting before the female.
 
blue-footed booby
 
> North Carolina during the breeding season, and from just
> south of the Canada-US border to Mexico during the winter.
> It shares its name with a Pulitzer-prizewinning novel.
 
blue jay
 
> recounted his journey in the segregationist US Deep South.
> Griffin temporarily darkened his skin to pass as a black
> man and explore life from the other side of the color line.
 
Black Like Me
 
> society featuring a subculture of extreme youth violence.
> The book is partially written in a Russian-influenced argot
> called Nadsat.
 
A Clockwork Orange
 
> Depression, it tells the story of Cecilia, a clumsy waitress
> who goes to the movies to escape her bleak life and lousy
> marriage.
 
The Purple Rose of Cairo
 
> falls on hard times and has to move in with her working-class
> sister in San Francisco. They're played by Cate Blanchett
> and Sally Hawkins.
 
Blue Jasmine
 
--
_______________________________________________________________________
Dan Blum tool@panix.com
"I wouldn't have believed it myself if I hadn't just made it up."
Bruce Bowler <bruce.bowler@gmail.com>: Dec 10 03:24PM

On Mon, 10 Dec 2018 04:00:39 -0600, Mark Brader wrote:
 
> "Flashdance", which was the third-highest-grossing movie of any kind
> in 1983. In "Flashdance", *who plays Alex Owens*, welder by day,
> exotic dancer by night?
 
Beal?
 
> West! Co-starring in the movie, as an American tap dancer who has
> defected to the USSR, was this actor and dancer, who died in 2003.
> Who?
 
Hines?
 
 
> case of this disease -- which helped his colleague, Walter Reed,
> prove that mosquitoes were responsible for its spread. Name the
> disease.
 
Yellow fever
 
> resulted in the deaths of an estimated 75-200 million people in
> Europe and Asia, the peak of which was in the mid-14th century.
> What is it commonly known as?
 
The black death
 
> Award in 1971 and is a six-time All-Star,
> and one of five players to start in the All-Star Game for both
> the American and National Leagues.
 
Vida Blue
 
> California Angels and the Florida Marlins. He is a Gold Glove
> winner and is now working as a batting coach for the Buffalo
> Bisons.
 
Vida Blue
 
 
> C1. This geological formation up to 350 feet (110 m) high forms
> an 8-mile (13 km) section of the Kent coastline in England,
> facing France. What is it called?
 
White cliffs of Dover
 
> then curves west across Ethiopia and northwest into Sudan,
> a total of at least 900 miles (1,450 km), before becoming part of
> a larger river system. Name this specific river.
 
Blue Nile
 
> Galapagos Islands. It is easily recognizable by its distinctive
> colored feet, which males display in an elaborate mating ritual
> by lifting them up and down while strutting before the female.
 
Blue Boobie
 
> Anthony Burgess. It's set in a near-future English society
> featuring a subculture of extreme youth violence. The book is
> partially written in a Russian-influenced argot called Nadsat.
 
A Clockwork Orange
 
> and Danny Aiello. Set in New Jersey during the Great Depression,
> it tells the story of Cecilia, a clumsy waitress who goes to the
> movies to escape her bleak life and lousy marriage.
 
Purple Rose of Cairo
 
Pete Gayde <pagrsg@wowway.com>: Dec 11 03:25AM

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote in news:7dqdnUUvDNDapJPBnZ2dnUU7-
> was "Flashdance", which was the third-highest-grossing movie
> of any kind in 1983. In "Flashdance", *who plays Alex Owens*,
> welder by day, exotic dancer by night?
 
Swayze
 
> the West! Co-starring in the movie, as an American tap dancer
> who has defected to the USSR, was this actor and dancer, who
> died in 2003. Who?
 
Hines
 
> and "Singin' in the Rain". Film critic Pauline Kael said of her:
> "When she wraps her phenomenal legs around Astaire, she can be
> forgiven everything." By what name is she best known?
 
Cyd Charisse
 
> Irving Berlin, and is perhaps best known for its "cheek-to-cheek"
> dance routine, with Rogers wearing an elaborate ostrich-feather
> dress.
 
High Society
 
> extended ballet sequences. It is said that Gene Kelly was only
> able to convince studio execs to allow ballet in "An American
> in Paris" after making them watch this movie several times.
 
Little Mermaid; Ugly Duckling
 
> "West Side Story". In this movie, he is prominently featured
> in dance sequences around farm activities like woodchopping
> and raising a barn.
 
Seven Brides for Seven Brothers
 
> severe case of this disease -- which helped his colleague,
> Walter Reed, prove that mosquitoes were responsible for
> its spread. Name the disease.
 
Malaria
 
> resulted in the deaths of an estimated 75-200 million
> people in Europe and Asia, the peak of which was in the
> mid-14th century. What is it commonly known as?
 
Bubonic Plague
 
> Award and MVP Award in 1971 and is a six-time All-Star,
> and one of five players to start in the All-Star Game for
> both the American and National Leagues.
 
Vida Blue
 
 
> C1. This geological formation up to 350 feet (110 m) high forms
> an 8-mile (13 km) section of the Kent coastline in England,
> facing France. What is it called?
 
White Cliffs of Dover
 
> then curves west across Ethiopia and northwest into Sudan,
> a total of at least 900 miles (1,450 km), before becoming
> part of a larger river system. Name this specific river.
 
Blue Nile
 
> society featuring a subculture of extreme youth violence.
> The book is partially written in a Russian-influenced argot
> called Nadsat.
 
A Clockwork Orange
 
> falls on hard times and has to move in with her working-class
> sister in San Francisco. They're played by Cate Blanchett
> and Sally Hawkins.
 
Pete Gayde
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Monday, December 10, 2018

Digest for rec.games.trivia@googlegroups.com - 6 updates in 4 topics

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Dec 10 04:00AM -0600

These questions were written to be asked in Toronto on 2018-07-30,
and should be interpreted accordingly.
 
On each question you may give up to two answers, but if you give
both a right answer and a wrong answer, there is a small penalty.
Please post all your answers to the newsgroup in a single followup,
based only on your own knowledge. (In your answer posting, quote
the questions and place your answer below each one.) I will reveal
the correct answers in about 4 days.
 
All questions were written by members of What She Said and are
used here by permission, but have been reformatted and may have
been retyped and/or edited by me. For further information see
my 2018-07-16 companion posting on "Questions from the Canadian
Inquisition (QFTCI*)".
 
 
** Game 10, Round 9 - Entertainment - Dancing Movies
 
1. The 1980s had no shortage of box-office hits featuring dancing.
There was "Footloose"; there was "Dirty Dancing". And there
was "Flashdance", which was the third-highest-grossing movie
of any kind in 1983. In "Flashdance", *who plays Alex Owens*,
welder by day, exotic dancer by night?
 
2. Also from the 1980s, "White Nights" featured Mikhail Baryshnikov
as -- wait for it -- a Soviet ballet dancer who has defected to
the West! Co-starring in the movie, as an American tap dancer
who has defected to the USSR, was this actor and dancer, who
died in 2003. Who?
 
3. Born Tula Ellice Finklea in 1922, she started dancing to
increase her strength after a childhood bout of polio. She went
on to appear in "The Band Wagon", "Brigadoon", "Silk Stockings",
and "Singin' in the Rain". Film critic Pauline Kael said of her:
"When she wraps her phenomenal legs around Astaire, she can be
forgiven everything." By what name is she best known?
 
4. Born in Alabama in 1980, this actor worked as a roofer and
stripper before gaining fame in 2006's hip-hop dance drama
"Step Up". Of his performance in 2015's "Magic Mike XXL",
writer Roxane Gay wrote: "I wanted to hug every part of him
with my mouth." Name him.
 
For questions #5-10, name the movie.
 
5. Of all the movies co-starring Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire,
this one from 1935 was the most successful. It featured songs by
Irving Berlin, and is perhaps best known for its "cheek-to-cheek"
dance routine, with Rogers wearing an elaborate ostrich-feather
dress.
 
6. This 1948 film by the British filmmakers Powell and Pressburger
was based on a Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale, and featured
extended ballet sequences. It is said that Gene Kelly was only
able to convince studio execs to allow ballet in "An American
in Paris" after making them watch this movie several times.
 
7. This 1954 MGM musical directed by Stanley Donen ["DONN-en"],
one of the first to be filmed in CinemaScope, jump-started the
career of acrobatic actor Russ Tamblyn, who later appeared in
"West Side Story". In this movie, he is prominently featured
in dance sequences around farm activities like woodchopping
and raising a barn.
 
8. This 1979 semi-autobiographical Bob Fosse film, which stars
Roy Scheider as an egomaniacal director and choreographer,
was selected for preservation in the National Film Registry by
the Library of Congress.
 
9. This Australian movie by Baz Luhrmann about the "Pan-Pacific
Grand Prix Dancing Championship" won the People's Choice award
at the 1992 Toronto International Film Festival.
 
10. This 1996 Japanese movie about a middle-aged accountant who
signs up for ballroom lessons to reinvigorate his life was so
successful in Japan that ballroom dancing, previously considered
odd, became a national craze. It was remade in English in 2004,
starring Richard Gere and Jennifer Lopez. Both versions have
the same title in English -- what is it?
 
 
** Game 10, Round 10 - Challenge - Color My World
 
A colorful challenge round to cap off a colorful season -- every
answer mentions a color.
 
* A. History: Colorful Diseases
 
A1. In 1900, US Army physician James Carroll allowed a
disease-infected mosquito to feed on him. He developed a
severe case of this disease -- which helped his colleague,
Walter Reed, prove that mosquitoes were responsible for
its spread. Name the disease.
 
A2. One of the most devasting pandemics in human history
resulted in the deaths of an estimated 75-200 million
people in Europe and Asia, the peak of which was in the
mid-14th century. What is it commonly known as?
 
* B. Sport: Colorful Athletes
 
Name these baseball players.
 
B1. During his 17-year career, this southpaw pitcher played for
the Oakland Athletics, the San Francisco Giants and the
Kansas City Royals. He won the American League Cy Young
Award and MVP Award in 1971 and is a six-time All-Star,
and one of five players to start in the All-Star Game for
both the American and National Leagues.
 
B2. This Jamaican-born former center fielder played with the
Blue Jays from 1991 to 1995. His other teams included the
California Angels and the Florida Marlins. He is a Gold
Glove winner and is now working as a batting coach for the
Buffalo Bisons.
 
* C. Geography: Water Colors (or Close-to-Water Colors)
 
C1. This geological formation up to 350 feet (110 m) high forms
an 8-mile (13 km) section of the Kent coastline in England,
facing France. What is it called?
 
C2. This river flows southeast from Lake Tana in Ethiopia,
then curves west across Ethiopia and northwest into Sudan,
a total of at least 900 miles (1,450 km), before becoming
part of a larger river system. Name this specific river.
 
* D. Science: Flying Colors
 
In each case, name the bird.
 
D1. This marine bird is native to subtropical and tropical
regions of the eastern Pacific Ocean, and primarily on
the Galapagos Islands. It is easily recognizable by
its distinctive colored feet, which males display in an
elaborate mating ritual by lifting them up and down while
strutting before the female.
 
D2. This small North American migratory bird is known for
its distinctive color. It ranges from mid-Alberta to
North Carolina during the breeding season, and from just
south of the Canada-US border to Mexico during the winter.
It shares its name with a Pulitzer-prizewinning novel.
 
* E. History: Colorful Reading
 
In each case, name the book.
 
E1. This 1961 nonfiction book by John Howard Griffin
recounted his journey in the segregationist US Deep South.
Griffin temporarily darkened his skin to pass as a black
man and explore life from the other side of the color line.
 
E2. This 1962 dystopian satire was written by English writer
Anthony Burgess. It's set in a near-future English
society featuring a subculture of extreme youth violence.
The book is partially written in a Russian-influenced argot
called Nadsat.
 
* F. Entertainment: Colorful Movies
 
These two movies were both directed by Woody Allen. Name them.
 
F1. This 1985 romantic fantasy starred Mia Farrow, Jeff Daniels,
and Danny Aiello. Set in New Jersey during the Great
Depression, it tells the story of Cecilia, a clumsy waitress
who goes to the movies to escape her bleak life and lousy
marriage.
 
F2. This 2013 dark comedy features a Manhattan socialite who
falls on hard times and has to move in with her working-class
sister in San Francisco. They're played by Cate Blanchett
and Sally Hawkins.
 
--
Mark Brader | "Continuing to be predictable, I looked at Wikipedia
Toronto | and saw that some people agree with you
msb@vex.net | and some don't." --Jerry Friedman
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
Dan Tilque <dtilque@frontier.com>: Dec 09 03:54PM -0800

Mark Brader wrote:
> skilled gunfighter during his time with the Wild Bunch and the
> Hole-in-the-Wall Gang, but you probably know him better by a
> different soubriquet. What's that?
 
Butch Cassidy
 
> he was simply paying initial investors with the investments
> of later investors -- and pocketing a large share for himself.
> This type of con is now named after him. What's his name?
 
Ponzi
 
> being hired by other crime syndicates to assassinate whoever
> the gangs thought needed killing. The group was responsible
> for as many as 1,000 contract killings. What was it called?
 
Murder Inc.
 
> Las Vegas. Legend has it that the reason he was whacked by
> the Mob in 1947 was because he spent too much money upgrading
> the Flamingo Hotel to his high standard. Who is #15?
 
Bugsy Siegel
 
> is also somewhere on the handout. Which number is he? *Hint*:
> his handout picture was taken when he was 24, about 6 months
> before he and Bonnie were killed.
 
13
 
 
> 6. Jesse James was one of the most successful Wild West outlaws,
> committing a large number of train robberies before being killed
> by Robert Ford in 1882.
 
10
 
 
> 7. Lucky Luciano was the first boss of the Genovese crime family
> and is considered the father of modern American organized crime.
 
18
 
 
> 8. John Dillinger was the second man to be named Public Enemy #1;
> he robbed 24 banks and four police stations, and escaped from
> jail twice.
 
6
 
> of dollars, but many of the details of that confession -- such
> as the now-legendary "Murder Hotel", designed to let him kill
> guests in their sleep -- were fabricated, or very likely so.
 
14
 
 
> 10. Charles "Pretty Boy" Floyd was named Public Enemy #1 after
> Dillinger was shot to death by federal agents in 1934; Floyd was
> killed by the FBI less than 6 months later. Which number is he?
 
8
 
> horizontally from back to front across the larynx, these vibrate,
> modulating the flow of air being expelled from the lungs during
> phonation. What are they?
 
vocal chords
 
> It also performs an important function in respiration: as it
> contracts, the volume of the thoracic cavity increases and air
> is drawn into the lungs. Name it.
 
diaphram
 
> cartilages of the larynx. A consonantal sound or "stop", common
> in many languages, is produced by obstructing airflow across it.
> What is this opening called? Exact answer required.
 
pharynx
 
> pulsating change of pitch. It is used to add expression to
> vocal and instrumental music. In well-produced singing it occurs
> naturally. Distortions of it are known as a bleat or a wobble.
 
reverberation
 
> greater amplitude at specific frequencies. In singing, the
> different areas where this may occur are in the chest, mouth,
> nose, and head. What is this phenomenon called?
 
resonance
 
> For the purposes of Western classical choral singing, however,
> voices are usually classified into just four categories.
> Name *all four*.
 
alto tenor baritone bass
 
 
--
Dan Tilque
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Dec 10 03:56AM -0600

Mark Brader:
> skilled gunfighter during his time with the Wild Bunch and the
> Hole-in-the-Wall Gang, but you probably know him better by a
> different soubriquet. What's that?
 
Sundance Kid. 4 for Dan Blum, Calvin, and Pete. 3 for Joshua.
 
> he was simply paying initial investors with the investments
> of later investors -- and pocketing a large share for himself.
> This type of con is now named after him. What's his name?
 
Charles Ponzi. 4 for everyone -- Dan Blum, Erland, Calvin, Joshua,
Pete, and Dan Tilque.
 
> being hired by other crime syndicates to assassinate whoever
> the gangs thought needed killing. The group was responsible
> for as many as 1,000 contract killings. What was it called?
 
Murder Inc. 4 for Dan Blum, Joshua, and Dan Tilque.
 
> Las Vegas. Legend has it that the reason he was whacked by
> the Mob in 1947 was because he spent too much money upgrading
> the Flamingo Hotel to his high standard. Who is #15?
 
Bugsy Siegel. 4 for Dan Blum, Joshua, and Dan Tilque.
 
A much shorter version of this question, with the man's initials
given rather than his photo, was a $1,600 question on "Jeopardy!"
on 2018-11-23.
 
> is also somewhere on the handout. Which number is he? *Hint*:
> his handout picture was taken when he was 24, about 6 months
> before he and Bonnie were killed.
 
#4. 3 for Calvin. 2 for Dan Blum and Joshua.
 
> 6. Jesse James was one of the most successful Wild West outlaws,
> committing a large number of train robberies before being killed
> by Robert Ford in 1882.
 
#8. 4 for Dan Blum. 3 for Calvin. 2 for Joshua.
 
> 7. Lucky Luciano was the first boss of the Genovese crime family
> and is considered the father of modern American organized crime.
 
#3. 4 for Pete. 3 for Calvin.
 
> 8. John Dillinger was the second man to be named Public Enemy #1;
> he robbed 24 banks and four police stations, and escaped from
> jail twice.
 
#5. 4 for Pete. 2 for Joshua.
 
> of dollars, but many of the details of that confession -- such
> as the now-legendary "Murder Hotel", designed to let him kill
> guests in their sleep -- were fabricated, or very likely so.
 
#16. 4 for Dan Blum. 3 for Joshua.
 
> 10. Charles "Pretty Boy" Floyd was named Public Enemy #1 after
> Dillinger was shot to death by federal agents in 1934; Floyd was
> killed by the FBI less than 6 months later. Which number is he?
 
#14. 3 for Dan Blum. 2 for Joshua and Pete.
 
> And if you like, decode the rot13 to see who the 7 decoys were,
> and give their photo numbers for fun, but for no points.
 
Nobody tried these.
 
> 11. Butch Cassidy.
 
#13.
 
> 12. Ma Barker.
 
#2.
 
> 13. Machine Gun Kelly.
 
#17.
 
> 14. Meyer Lansky.
 
#7.
 
> 15. Al Capone.
 
#18.
 
> 16. John Wesley Hardin.
 
#10.
 
> 17. Bumpy Johnson.
 
#6.
 
 
> horizontally from back to front across the larynx, these vibrate,
> modulating the flow of air being expelled from the lungs during
> phonation. What are they?
 
Vocal cords (or folds). 4 for Dan Blum, Erland, Joshua, Pete,
and Dan Tilque.
 
Spelling not: they're *cords*! A "chord" is a musical sound.
 
> It also performs an important function in respiration: as it
> contracts, the volume of the thoracic cavity increases and air
> is drawn into the lungs. Name it.
 
Diaphragm. 4 for Dan Blum, Joshua, Pete, and Dan Tilque.
 
> cartilages of the larynx. A consonantal sound or "stop", common
> in many languages, is produced by obstructing airflow across it.
> What is this opening called? Exact answer required.
 
Glottis. 4 for Dan Blum, Erland, and Joshua.
 
> throat is opened and relaxed by raising the velum, like at
> the beginning of a yawn. The velum also has a different,
> more common, 2-word name. What is it?
 
Soft palate. 4 for Dan Blum and Joshua.
 
> pulsating change of pitch. It is used to add expression to
> vocal and instrumental music. In well-produced singing it occurs
> naturally. Distortions of it are known as a bleat or a wobble.
 
Vibrato. 4 for Dan Blum, Joshua, and Pete.
 
> greater amplitude at specific frequencies. In singing, the
> different areas where this may occur are in the chest, mouth,
> nose, and head. What is this phenomenon called?
 
Resonance. I accepted "sympathetic vibration". 4 for Dan Blum,
Erland, Joshua, and Dan Tilque.
 
> For the purposes of Western classical choral singing, however,
> voices are usually classified into just four categories.
> Name *all four*.
 
Soprano, alto, tenor, bass. 4 for Erland, Joshua, and Pete.
 
The others are baritone (which two people guessed in place of
one of the basic four -- no points for that), mezzo-soprano, and
countertenor.
 
> they reach puberty. The male voice typically deepens an octave,
> while the female voice usually deepens by just a few notes.
> What's it called?
 
Change, break, or mutation of the voice. 4 for Erland.
 
> closure of the <answer 3>, thus emitting a low frequency popping
> or rattling sound. Its use is often criticized, especially
> in women.
 
Vocal fry. 4 for Dan Blum and Joshua.
 
> This tuning allows singers to appear to produce more than one
> pitch at the same time. By what 2-word name is overtone singing
> more commonly known?
 
Throat singing. 4 for Dan Blum.
 
 
Scores, if there are no errors:
 
GAME 10 ROUNDS-> 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 BEST
TOPICS-> Geo Lei Lit Aud Can His Sci FIVE
Dan Blum 20 35 31 13 2 29 32 147
Joshua Kreitzer 24 27 36 26 9 26 32 147
Pete Gayde 19 32 24 30 3 18 16 123
Dan Tilque 20 32 16 4 4 12 12 92
Erland Sommarskog 20 28 8 0 0 4 20 80
"Calvin" -- -- 15 6 0 17 0 38
 
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "I can't tell from this... whether you're
msb@vex.net | a wise man or a wise guy." --Ted Schuerzinger
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
Dan Tilque <dtilque@frontier.com>: Dec 09 02:22PM -0800

Calvin wrote:
> 1 Who co-starred with Doris Day in the 1959 romantic comedy 'Pillow Talk'?
 
Cary Grant
 
> 2 What is a person most likely to purchase when visiting London's Savile Row?
 
clothes ( a suit, if you want more specific answer)
 
> 3 In 1867 who first said "Politics is the art of the possible"?
 
Gladstone
 
> 4 Which British theatrical company is also known as the RSC?
 
Royal Shakespeare Company
 
> 5 Which 1797 poem by Johann Goethe was the inspiration for a musical composition by Paul Dukas that appears in the 1940s Disney film 'Fantasia'?
> 6 Why was Muhammad Ali stripped of his World Heavyweight title in 1967?
 
resisted the draft
 
> 7 What was the surname of the brothers who gave the world's first commercial cinema screening in Paris in 1895?
> 8 The adrenal, thyroid and pituitary glands are components of which bodily system?
 
endocrine
 
> 9 What European city does Schiphol airport serve?
 
Belfast
 
> 10 in 1976 which Asian country became to host a F1 Grand Prix?
 
Japan
 
 
 
--
Dan Tilque
Dan Tilque <dtilque@frontier.com>: Dec 09 12:33PM -0800

Mark Brader wrote:
> that was going to be the right answer. I would not have thought that
> "two" would be so common (and I also don't think "to" really qualifies
> as a homophone of it).
 
I expected "too" not to be that common.
 
--
Dan Tilque
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Dec 09 03:52PM -0600

"Calvin":
>>>> 4 Which 3 homophones make the list of the 200 most commonly used
>>>> English words?
>>> To, too, two
 
Mark Brader:
>> that was going to be the right answer. I would not have thought that
>> "two" would be so common (and I also don't think "to" really qualifies
>> as a homophone of it).

Dan Tilque:
> I expected "too" not to be that common.
 
So, Calvin, which list of the 200 most commonly used English words were
you referring to?
--
Mark Brader, Toronto "Information! ... We want information!"
msb@vex.net -- The Prisoner
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
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Saturday, December 08, 2018

Digest for rec.games.trivia@googlegroups.com - 6 updates in 3 topics

Erland Sommarskog <esquel@sommarskog.se>: Dec 07 05:05PM +0100

> 2 What is a person most likely to purchase when visiting London?s
> Savile Row?
 
A tie
 
> 3 In 1867 who first said "Politics is the art of the possible"?
 
Disraeli
 
> 4 Which British theatrical company is also known as the RSC?
 
Royal Shakespare Company
 
> 6 Why was Muhammad Ali stripped of his World Heavyweight title in
> 1967?
 
He refused to go Vietnam as a soldier
 
> 9 What European city does Schiphol airport serve?
 
Amsterdam
 
> 10 in 1976 which Asian country became to host a F1 Grand Prix?
 
Japan
Pete Gayde <pagrsg@wowway.com>: Dec 07 09:41PM

Calvin <334152@gmail.com> wrote in
 
> 1 Who co-starred with Doris Day in the 1959 romantic comedy
> 'Pillow Talk'?
 
Rock Hudson
 
> 2 What is a person most likely to purchase when
> visiting London's Savile Row?
 
Clothing
 
> 3 In 1867 who first said "Politics is the art of the possible"?
 
Disraeli
 
> 4 Which British theatrical company is also known as the RSC?
 
Royal Shakespeare Company
 
> 5 Which 1797 poem by Johann Goethe was the
> inspiration for a musical composition by Paul Dukas that appears in
> the 1940s Disney film 'Fantasia'?
 
The Sorcerer's Apprentice
 
> 6 Why was Muhammad Ali stripped
> of his World Heavyweight title in 1967?
 
He refused to submit to the military draft
 
> 7 What was the surname of
> the brothers who gave the world's first commercial cinema screening in
> Paris in 1895?
 
Lumiere
 
> 8 The adrenal, thyroid and pituitary glands are
> components of which bodily system?
 
Digestive
 
> 9 What European city does Schiphol airport serve?
 
Amsterdam
 
> 10 in 1976 which Asian country became to
> host a F1 Grand Prix?
 
Singapore
 
 
> cheers,
> calvin
 
Pete Gayde
Pete Gayde <pagrsg@wowway.com>: Dec 07 09:17PM

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote in news:Euqdnbfh4cmkn5TBnZ2dnUU7-
> skilled gunfighter during his time with the Wild Bunch and the
> Hole-in-the-Wall Gang, but you probably know him better by a
> different soubriquet. What's that?
 
Sundance Kid
 
> he was simply paying initial investors with the investments
> of later investors -- and pocketing a large share for himself.
> This type of con is now named after him. What's his name?
 
Ponzi
 
> Las Vegas. Legend has it that the reason he was whacked by
> the Mob in 1947 was because he spent too much money upgrading
> the Flamingo Hotel to his high standard. Who is #15?
 
Meyer Lansky
 
> is also somewhere on the handout. Which number is he? *Hint*:
> his handout picture was taken when he was 24, about 6 months
> before he and Bonnie were killed.
 
14; 17
 
 
> 6. Jesse James was one of the most successful Wild West outlaws,
> committing a large number of train robberies before being killed
> by Robert Ford in 1882.
 
13
 
 
> 7. Lucky Luciano was the first boss of the Genovese crime family
> and is considered the father of modern American organized crime.
 
3
 
 
> 8. John Dillinger was the second man to be named Public Enemy #1;
> he robbed 24 banks and four police stations, and escaped from
> jail twice.
 
5
 
> of dollars, but many of the details of that confession -- such
> as the now-legendary "Murder Hotel", designed to let him kill
> guests in their sleep -- were fabricated, or very likely so.
 
4; 10
 
 
> 10. Charles "Pretty Boy" Floyd was named Public Enemy #1 after
> Dillinger was shot to death by federal agents in 1934; Floyd was
> killed by the FBI less than 6 months later. Which number is he?
 
7; 14
 
> horizontally from back to front across the larynx, these vibrate,
> modulating the flow of air being expelled from the lungs during
> phonation. What are they?
 
Vocal cords
 
> It also performs an important function in respiration: as it
> contracts, the volume of the thoracic cavity increases and air
> is drawn into the lungs. Name it.
 
Diaphragm
 
> cartilages of the larynx. A consonantal sound or "stop", common
> in many languages, is produced by obstructing airflow across it.
> What is this opening called? Exact answer required.
 
Epiglottus
 
> pulsating change of pitch. It is used to add expression to
> vocal and instrumental music. In well-produced singing it occurs
> naturally. Distortions of it are known as a bleat or a wobble.
 
Vibrato
 
> For the purposes of Western classical choral singing, however,
> voices are usually classified into just four categories.
> Name *all four*.
 
Soprano, Alto, Tenor, Bass
 
> This tuning allows singers to appear to produce more than one
> pitch at the same time. By what 2-word name is overtone singing
> more commonly known?
 
Pete Gayde
Bruce Bowler <bruce.bowler@gmail.com>: Dec 07 02:32PM

On Thu, 06 Dec 2018 18:58:34 -0600, Mark Brader wrote:
 
> that was going to be the right answer. I would not have thought that
> "two" would be so common (and I also don't think "to" really qualifies
> as a homophone of it).
 
And "they're" is "two" words :-)
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Dec 06 06:58PM -0600

"Calvin":
> > 4 Which 3 homophones make the list of the 200 most commonly used English words?
 
> To, too, two
 
Really! When I saw people trying "there, their, they're", I was sure
that was going to be the right answer. I would not have thought that
"two" would be so common (and I also don't think "to" really qualifies
as a homophone of it).
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "This man must be very ignorant, for he answers
msb@vex.net | every question he is asked." -- Voltaire
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
Erland Sommarskog <esquel@sommarskog.se>: Dec 07 05:03PM +0100

>> 10 Made with coconut milk, potatoes and nuts, Massaman curry
originated in which Asian country?
 
> Thailand
 
Since I appear to have been credited with a point on this one, I feel
obliged to point out that Thailand and Malaysia are two different
countries.
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Friday, December 07, 2018

Digest for rec.games.trivia@googlegroups.com - 14 updates in 4 topics

tool@panix.com (Dan Blum): Dec 06 02:42PM

> > of a young cancer patient falling in love with an amputee.
> > It was adapted into a massive hit film.
 
> "The Fault in our Stars". 4 for Dan Blum.
 
I actually said "The World in our Stars."
 
--
_______________________________________________________________________
Dan Blum tool@panix.com
"I wouldn't have believed it myself if I hadn't just made it up."
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Dec 06 12:44PM -0600

Mark Brader:
> > > of a young cancer patient falling in love with an amputee.
> > > It was adapted into a massive hit film.
 
> > "The Fault in our Stars". 4 for Dan Blum.

Dan Blum:
> I actually said "The World in our Stars."
 
3, then.
 
 
Scores, if there are now no errors:
 
GAME 10 ROUNDS-> 2 3 4 5 6 BEST
TOPICS-> Geo Lei Lit Aud Can THREE
Joshua Kreitzer 24 27 36 26 9 89
Dan Blum 20 35 31 13 2 86
Pete Gayde 19 32 24 30 3 86
Dan Tilque 20 32 16 4 4 68
Erland Sommarskog 20 28 8 0 0 56
"Calvin" -- -- 15 6 0 21
 
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "If gravity stops working, a power cut is
msb@vex.net | the least of your problems." -- David Bell
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
Joshua Kreitzer <gromit82@hotmail.com>: Dec 07 04:44AM

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote in news:F-GdnbbdiNHlnJTBnZ2dnUU7-
 
>> This time I have no information about the two decoys.
 
> Joshua and Calvin identified the music for #8 as "The Sorcerer's
> Apprentice" by Paul Dukas, which I'm sure is correct.
 
For the record, the music for the other decoy, #11, with the toy soldier
and ballerina, was Piano Concerto No. 2 by Dmitri Shostakovich. (I didn't
remember that segment from "Fantasia 2000" and had to look it up after the
answers were posted.)
 
--
Joshua Kreitzer
gromit82@hotmail.com
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Dec 07 12:09AM -0600

Mark Brader:
>>> http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/10-5/fanta.pdf
 
Joshua Kreitzer:
> and ballerina, was Piano Concerto No. 2 by Dmitri Shostakovich. (I didn't
> remember that segment from "Fantasia 2000" and had to look it up after the
> answers were posted.)
 
Thanks.
--
Mark Brader, Toronto "The cure of the typo has struck again."
msb@vex.net --Peter Young
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Dec 06 05:04AM -0600

These questions were written to be asked in Toronto on 2018-07-30,
and should be interpreted accordingly.
 
On each question you may give up to two answers, but if you give
both a right answer and a wrong answer, there is a small penalty.
Please post all your answers to the newsgroup in a single followup,
based only on your own knowledge. (In your answer posting, quote
the questions and place your answer below each one.) I will reveal
the correct answers in about 4 days.
 
All questions were written by members of What She Said and are
used here by permission, but have been reformatted and may have
been retyped and/or edited by me. For further information see
my 2018-07-16 companion posting on "Questions from the Canadian
Inquisition (QFTCI*)".
 
 
* Game 10, Round 7 - History - Outlaws
 
We've given you a 2-page handout:
 
http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/10-7/croox.pdf
 
with 18 very, very bad people on it -- outlaws, crime bosses,
bank robbers, murderers, and crooks -- all of them American.
Questions #1-4 will ask you about a specific photo:
 
1. #1 is Harry Longabaugh, who developed a reputation for being a
skilled gunfighter during his time with the Wild Bunch and the
Hole-in-the-Wall Gang, but you probably know him better by a
different soubriquet. What's that?
 
2. The man in #9, a swindler, is nowadays known for the con he
invented, wherein he convinced his marks that he could make them
a fortune by purchasing postal reply coupons in Italy in bulk,
and then selling them in America for a massive profit. In fact,
he was simply paying initial investors with the investments
of later investors -- and pocketing a large share for himself.
This type of con is now named after him. What's his name?
 
3. #12 is Louis "Lepke" Buchalter, the only mob boss in American
history to receive the death penalty. Buchalter is remembered
primarily for running a crime syndicate which had one purpose:
being hired by other crime syndicates to assassinate whoever
the gangs thought needed killing. The group was responsible
for as many as 1,000 contract killings. What was it called?
 
4. Although Buchalter became the primary boss of <answer 3>,
he was only a sub-boss when it was founded by the man in
photo #15, who was already a prominent figure in the Jewish mob.
This man then became a key figure in the Mob's expansion into
Las Vegas. Legend has it that the reason he was whacked by
the Mob in 1947 was because he spent too much money upgrading
the Flamingo Hotel to his high standard. Who is #15?
 
For questions #5-10, you must give the photo number for the person
we describe.
 
5. Many of you have probably already guessed that photo #11 is
Bonnie Parker, the infamous bank robber. Her lover Clyde Barrow
is also somewhere on the handout. Which number is he? *Hint*:
his handout picture was taken when he was 24, about 6 months
before he and Bonnie were killed.
 
6. Jesse James was one of the most successful Wild West outlaws,
committing a large number of train robberies before being killed
by Robert Ford in 1882.
 
7. Lucky Luciano was the first boss of the Genovese crime family
and is considered the father of modern American organized crime.
 
8. John Dillinger was the second man to be named Public Enemy #1;
he robbed 24 banks and four police stations, and escaped from
jail twice.
 
9. H.H. Holmes is the first documented American serial killer,
with at least nine confirmed victims in Toronto, Chicago, and
Boston between 1890 and 1894. Holmes claimed to have killed many
more in a confession which he sold to newspapers for thousands
of dollars, but many of the details of that confession -- such
as the now-legendary "Murder Hotel", designed to let him kill
guests in their sleep -- were fabricated, or very likely so.
 
10. Charles "Pretty Boy" Floyd was named Public Enemy #1 after
Dillinger was shot to death by federal agents in 1934; Floyd was
killed by the FBI less than 6 months later. Which number is he?
 
And if you like, decode the rot13 to see who the 7 decoys were,
and give their photo numbers for fun, but for no points.
 
11. Ohgpu Pnffvql.
12. Zn Onexre.
13. Znpuvar Tha Xryyl.
14. Zrlre Ynafxl.
15. Ny Pncbar.
16. Wbua Jrfyrl Uneqva.
17. Ohzcl Wbuafba.
 
 
* Game 10, Round 8 - Science - The Science of Singing
 
Turns out it's more complicated than just opening your mouth and
having music come out of it. Who knew?
 
1. Composed of twin infoldings of mucous membrane stretched
horizontally from back to front across the larynx, these vibrate,
modulating the flow of air being expelled from the lungs during
phonation. What are they?
 
2. This sheet of internal skeletal muscle extends across the
bottom of the thoracic cavity, and separates the thoracic cavity,
containing the heart and lungs, from the abdominal cavity.
It also performs an important function in respiration: as it
contracts, the volume of the thoracic cavity increases and air
is drawn into the lungs. Name it.
 
3. This opening is between the vocal cords and the arytenoid
cartilages of the larynx. A consonantal sound or "stop", common
in many languages, is produced by obstructing airflow across it.
What is this opening called? Exact answer required.
 
4. The velum is the tissue constituting the back of the roof of
the mouth. A higher singing range can be attained when the
throat is opened and relaxed by raising the velum, like at
the beginning of a yawn. The velum also has a different,
more common, 2-word name. What is it?
 
5. This term refers to a musical effect consisting of a regular,
pulsating change of pitch. It is used to add expression to
vocal and instrumental music. In well-produced singing it occurs
naturally. Distortions of it are known as a bleat or a wobble.
 
6. In physics, this is a phenomenon in which a vibrating system
or external force drives another system to oscillate with
greater amplitude at specific frequencies. In singing, the
different areas where this may occur are in the chest, mouth,
nose, and head. What is this phenomenon called?
 
7. In vocal pedagogy, most voice types are grouped into seven major
categories according to pitch range and other characteristics.
For the purposes of Western classical choral singing, however,
voices are usually classified into just four categories.
Name *all four*.
 
8. This phenomenon is the deepening of the voice of people as
they reach puberty. The male voice typically deepens an octave,
while the female voice usually deepens by just a few notes.
What's it called?
 
9. This voice register, also known as pulse phonation, is the lowest
vocal register and is produced when air passes through a loose
closure of the <answer 3>, thus emitting a low frequency popping
or rattling sound. Its use is often criticized, especially
in women.
 
10. Overtone singing is a type of singing where the singer
manipulates the <answer 6> created as air travels from the
lungs by changing the shape of their mouth, larynx, and pharynx.
This tuning allows singers to appear to produce more than one
pitch at the same time. By what 2-word name is overtone singing
more commonly known?
 
--
Mark Brader First, the next time you buy a house, get one that
msb@vex.net costs exactly $100,000. It makes the math easier.
Toronto -- John Gilmer
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
tool@panix.com (Dan Blum): Dec 06 02:50PM

> skilled gunfighter during his time with the Wild Bunch and the
> Hole-in-the-Wall Gang, but you probably know him better by a
> different soubriquet. What's that?
 
The Sundance Kid
 
> he was simply paying initial investors with the investments
> of later investors -- and pocketing a large share for himself.
> This type of con is now named after him. What's his name?
 
Ponzi
 
> being hired by other crime syndicates to assassinate whoever
> the gangs thought needed killing. The group was responsible
> for as many as 1,000 contract killings. What was it called?
 
Murder Incorporated
 
> Las Vegas. Legend has it that the reason he was whacked by
> the Mob in 1947 was because he spent too much money upgrading
> the Flamingo Hotel to his high standard. Who is #15?
 
Bugsy Siegel
 
> is also somewhere on the handout. Which number is he? *Hint*:
> his handout picture was taken when he was 24, about 6 months
> before he and Bonnie were killed.
 
7; 4
 
> 6. Jesse James was one of the most successful Wild West outlaws,
> committing a large number of train robberies before being killed
> by Robert Ford in 1882.
 
8
 
> 7. Lucky Luciano was the first boss of the Genovese crime family
> and is considered the father of modern American organized crime.
 
18
 
> 8. John Dillinger was the second man to be named Public Enemy #1;
> he robbed 24 banks and four police stations, and escaped from
> jail twice.
 
17; 3
 
> of dollars, but many of the details of that confession -- such
> as the now-legendary "Murder Hotel", designed to let him kill
> guests in their sleep -- were fabricated, or very likely so.
 
16
 
> 10. Charles "Pretty Boy" Floyd was named Public Enemy #1 after
> Dillinger was shot to death by federal agents in 1934; Floyd was
> killed by the FBI less than 6 months later. Which number is he?
 
14; 13
 
 
> horizontally from back to front across the larynx, these vibrate,
> modulating the flow of air being expelled from the lungs during
> phonation. What are they?
 
vocal cords
 
> It also performs an important function in respiration: as it
> contracts, the volume of the thoracic cavity increases and air
> is drawn into the lungs. Name it.
 
diaphragm
 
> cartilages of the larynx. A consonantal sound or "stop", common
> in many languages, is produced by obstructing airflow across it.
> What is this opening called? Exact answer required.
 
glottis
 
> throat is opened and relaxed by raising the velum, like at
> the beginning of a yawn. The velum also has a different,
> more common, 2-word name. What is it?
 
soft palate
 
> pulsating change of pitch. It is used to add expression to
> vocal and instrumental music. In well-produced singing it occurs
> naturally. Distortions of it are known as a bleat or a wobble.
 
vibrato
 
> greater amplitude at specific frequencies. In singing, the
> different areas where this may occur are in the chest, mouth,
> nose, and head. What is this phenomenon called?
 
sympathetic vibration
 
> For the purposes of Western classical choral singing, however,
> voices are usually classified into just four categories.
> Name *all four*.
 
soprano, alto, tenor, baritone
 
> closure of the <answer 3>, thus emitting a low frequency popping
> or rattling sound. Its use is often criticized, especially
> in women.
 
vocal fry
 
> This tuning allows singers to appear to produce more than one
> pitch at the same time. By what 2-word name is overtone singing
> more commonly known?
 
throat singing
 
--
_______________________________________________________________________
Dan Blum tool@panix.com
"I wouldn't have believed it myself if I hadn't just made it up."
Erland Sommarskog <esquel@sommarskog.se>: Dec 06 09:38PM +0100

> he was simply paying initial investors with the investments
> of later investors -- and pocketing a large share for himself.
> This type of con is now named after him. What's his name?
 
Ponzi

> is also somewhere on the handout. Which number is he? *Hint*:
> his handout picture was taken when he was 24, about 6 months
> before he and Bonnie were killed.
 
10
 
> 6. Jesse James was one of the most successful Wild West outlaws,
> committing a large number of train robberies before being killed
> by Robert Ford in 1882.
 
17
 
> 7. Lucky Luciano was the first boss of the Genovese crime family
> and is considered the father of modern American organized crime.
 
15

> 8. John Dillinger was the second man to be named Public Enemy #1;
> he robbed 24 banks and four police stations, and escaped from
> jail twice.
 
7

> of dollars, but many of the details of that confession -- such
> as the now-legendary "Murder Hotel", designed to let him kill
> guests in their sleep -- were fabricated, or very likely so.
 
3
 
> 10. Charles "Pretty Boy" Floyd was named Public Enemy #1 after
> Dillinger was shot to death by federal agents in 1934; Floyd was
> killed by the FBI less than 6 months later. Which number is he?
 
4

> horizontally from back to front across the larynx, these vibrate,
> modulating the flow of air being expelled from the lungs during
> phonation. What are they?
 
Vocal chords
 
> cartilages of the larynx. A consonantal sound or "stop", common
> in many languages, is produced by obstructing airflow across it.
> What is this opening called? Exact answer required.
 
Glottis

> pulsating change of pitch. It is used to add expression to
> vocal and instrumental music. In well-produced singing it occurs
> naturally. Distortions of it are known as a bleat or a wobble.
 
Tremolo
 
> greater amplitude at specific frequencies. In singing, the
> different areas where this may occur are in the chest, mouth,
> nose, and head. What is this phenomenon called?
 
Resonance
 
> For the purposes of Western classical choral singing, however,
> voices are usually classified into just four categories.
> Name *all four*.
 
Soprano, Alto, Tenor, Bass

> they reach puberty. The male voice typically deepens an octave,
> while the female voice usually deepens by just a few notes.
> What's it called?
 
"Målbrott" in Swedish.
Calvin <334152@gmail.com>: Dec 06 04:50PM -0800

On Thursday, December 6, 2018 at 9:04:30 PM UTC+10, Mark Brader wrote:

> skilled gunfighter during his time with the Wild Bunch and the
> Hole-in-the-Wall Gang, but you probably know him better by a
> different soubriquet. What's that?
 
The Sundance Kid

> he was simply paying initial investors with the investments
> of later investors -- and pocketing a large share for himself.
> This type of con is now named after him. What's his name?
 
Ponzi
 
> being hired by other crime syndicates to assassinate whoever
> the gangs thought needed killing. The group was responsible
> for as many as 1,000 contract killings. What was it called?
 
Casa Nostra?
 
> Las Vegas. Legend has it that the reason he was whacked by
> the Mob in 1947 was because he spent too much money upgrading
> the Flamingo Hotel to his high standard. Who is #15?
 
Schultz, Greene
 
> is also somewhere on the handout. Which number is he? *Hint*:
> his handout picture was taken when he was 24, about 6 months
> before he and Bonnie were killed.
 
4, 9
 
> 6. Jesse James was one of the most successful Wild West outlaws,
> committing a large number of train robberies before being killed
> by Robert Ford in 1882.
 
8, 10
 
> 7. Lucky Luciano was the first boss of the Genovese crime family
> and is considered the father of modern American organized crime.
 
3, 9
 
> 8. John Dillinger was the second man to be named Public Enemy #1;
> he robbed 24 banks and four police stations, and escaped from
> jail twice.
 
17, 14
 
> of dollars, but many of the details of that confession -- such
> as the now-legendary "Murder Hotel", designed to let him kill
> guests in their sleep -- were fabricated, or very likely so.
 
13, 14
 
> 10. Charles "Pretty Boy" Floyd was named Public Enemy #1 after
> Dillinger was shot to death by federal agents in 1934; Floyd was
> killed by the FBI less than 6 months later. Which number is he?
 
9
 
 
> * Game 10, Round 8 - Science - The Science of Singing
 
Pass
 
cheers,
calvin
Joshua Kreitzer <gromit82@hotmail.com>: Dec 07 04:40AM

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote in news:Euqdnbfh4cmkn5TBnZ2dnUU7-
> skilled gunfighter during his time with the Wild Bunch and the
> Hole-in-the-Wall Gang, but you probably know him better by a
> different soubriquet. What's that?
 
Sundance Kid; Butch Cassidy
 
> he was simply paying initial investors with the investments
> of later investors -- and pocketing a large share for himself.
> This type of con is now named after him. What's his name?
 
Ponzi
 
> being hired by other crime syndicates to assassinate whoever
> the gangs thought needed killing. The group was responsible
> for as many as 1,000 contract killings. What was it called?
 
Murder Inc.

> Las Vegas. Legend has it that the reason he was whacked by
> the Mob in 1947 was because he spent too much money upgrading
> the Flamingo Hotel to his high standard. Who is #15?
 
Bugsy Siegel
 
> is also somewhere on the handout. Which number is he? *Hint*:
> his handout picture was taken when he was 24, about 6 months
> before he and Bonnie were killed.
 
#14; #4
 
> 6. Jesse James was one of the most successful Wild West outlaws,
> committing a large number of train robberies before being killed
> by Robert Ford in 1882.
 
#10; #8

> 7. Lucky Luciano was the first boss of the Genovese crime family
> and is considered the father of modern American organized crime.
 
#18
 
> 8. John Dillinger was the second man to be named Public Enemy #1;
> he robbed 24 banks and four police stations, and escaped from
> jail twice.
 
#3; #5

> of dollars, but many of the details of that confession -- such
> as the now-legendary "Murder Hotel", designed to let him kill
> guests in their sleep -- were fabricated, or very likely so.
 
#16; #8
 
> 10. Charles "Pretty Boy" Floyd was named Public Enemy #1 after
> Dillinger was shot to death by federal agents in 1934; Floyd was
> killed by the FBI less than 6 months later. Which number is he?
 
#7; #14

> horizontally from back to front across the larynx, these vibrate,
> modulating the flow of air being expelled from the lungs during
> phonation. What are they?
 
vocal cords

> It also performs an important function in respiration: as it
> contracts, the volume of the thoracic cavity increases and air
> is drawn into the lungs. Name it.
 
diaphragm
 
> cartilages of the larynx. A consonantal sound or "stop", common
> in many languages, is produced by obstructing airflow across it.
> What is this opening called? Exact answer required.
 
glottis

> throat is opened and relaxed by raising the velum, like at
> the beginning of a yawn. The velum also has a different,
> more common, 2-word name. What is it?
 
soft palate
 
> pulsating change of pitch. It is used to add expression to
> vocal and instrumental music. In well-produced singing it occurs
> naturally. Distortions of it are known as a bleat or a wobble.
 
vibrato

> greater amplitude at specific frequencies. In singing, the
> different areas where this may occur are in the chest, mouth,
> nose, and head. What is this phenomenon called?
 
resonance
 
> For the purposes of Western classical choral singing, however,
> voices are usually classified into just four categories.
> Name *all four*.
 
soprano, alto, tenor, bass
 
> closure of the <answer 3>, thus emitting a low frequency popping
> or rattling sound. Its use is often criticized, especially
> in women.
 
vocal fry

--
Joshua Kreitzer
gromit82@hotmail.com
Calvin <334152@gmail.com>: Dec 06 04:39PM -0800

1 Who co-starred with Doris Day in the 1959 romantic comedy 'Pillow Talk'?
2 What is a person most likely to purchase when visiting London's Savile Row?
3 In 1867 who first said "Politics is the art of the possible"?
4 Which British theatrical company is also known as the RSC?
5 Which 1797 poem by Johann Goethe was the inspiration for a musical composition by Paul Dukas that appears in the 1940s Disney film 'Fantasia'?
6 Why was Muhammad Ali stripped of his World Heavyweight title in 1967?
7 What was the surname of the brothers who gave the world's first commercial cinema screening in Paris in 1895?
8 The adrenal, thyroid and pituitary glands are components of which bodily system?
9 What European city does Schiphol airport serve?
10 in 1976 which Asian country became to host a F1 Grand Prix?
 
 
cheers,
calvin
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Dec 06 07:01PM -0600

"Calvin":
> 1 Who co-starred with Doris Day in the 1959 romantic comedy
> 'Pillow Talk'?
 
Rock Hudson.
 
> 2 What is a person most likely to purchase when visiting
> London's Savile Row?
 
Nothing, they can't afford the men's clothes sold there and are just
window-shopping.
 
> 3 In 1867 who first said "Politics is the art of the possible"?
 
Disraeli?
 
> 4 Which British theatrical company is also known as the RSC?
 
Royal Shakespeare Company.
 
> 5 Which 1797 poem by Johann Goethe was the inspiration for a
> musical composition by Paul Dukas that appears in the 1940s
> Disney film 'Fantasia'?
 
ObQFTCI: "The Sorcerer's Apprentice"?
 
> 6 Why was Muhammad Ali stripped of his World Heavyweight title in 1967?
 
He was convicted of draft-dodging.
 
> 7 What was the surname of the brothers who gave the world's first
> commercial cinema screening in Paris in 1895?
 
Appropriately, lumičre.
 
> 8 The adrenal, thyroid and pituitary glands are components of
> which bodily system?
 
Endocrine.
 
> 9 What European city does Schiphol airport serve?
 
Amsterdam.
 
> 10 in 1976 which Asian country became to host a F1 Grand Prix?
 
Japan?
--
Mark Brader "I love talking about nothing.
Toronto It's the only thing I know anything about."
msb@vex.net --Lord Goring (Oscar Wilde: An Ideal Husband)
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
tool@panix.com (Dan Blum): Dec 07 01:28AM


> 1 Who co-starred with Doris Day in the 1959 romantic comedy 'Pillow Talk'?
 
Rock Hudson
 
> 2 What is a person most likely to purchase when visiting London???s Savile Row?
 
clothing
 
> 3 In 1867 who first said "Politics is the art of the possible"?
 
Clausewitz
 
> 4 Which British theatrical company is also known as the RSC?
 
Royal Shakespeare Company
 
> 6 Why was Muhammad Ali stripped of his World Heavyweight title in 1967?
 
protesting the draft
 
> 9 What European city does Schiphol airport serve?
 
Amsterdam
 
> 10 in 1976 which Asian country became to host a F1 Grand Prix?
 
Japan
 
--
_______________________________________________________________________
Dan Blum tool@panix.com
"I wouldn't have believed it myself if I hadn't just made it up."
Calvin <334152@gmail.com>: Dec 06 04:38PM -0800

On Wednesday, November 28, 2018 at 2:56:13 PM UTC+10, Calvin wrote:
 
> 1 What two words does the chemistry term pH stand for?
 
Potential of Hydrogen. Also accepting power or the German potenz.
 
> 2 What distinguishes spermatophytes (a.k.a. phanerogams or phenogamae) from other varieties of plant life?
 
Accepting any answer involving seeds or spores.
 
> 3 Which style of cuisine includes quesadillas and chimichangas?
 
Mexican or Tex-Mex
 
> 4 Which 3 homophones make the list of the 200 most commonly used English words?
 
To, too, two
 
> 5 Which animated British TV series is set in Soggy Bottom Farm?
 
Shaun the Sheep
No-one got this but Peppa Pig was a good guess. is it even broadcast in North America?
https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0983983/
 
 
> 6 Which character was portrayed by Anne Bancroft in the 1967 film 'The Graduate'?
 
Mrs Robinson
She appears not to have a first name
 
> 7 Which hit song of 1965 includes the following line: When I'm drivin' in my car, and the man comes on the radio?
 
Satisfaction
 
> 8 According to the floor tilers' maxim, no room is ever… what?
 
Square
 
> 9 Which Swedish scientist formalised binomial nomenclature, the system of naming species with a two-word Latin name?
 
Carl Linnaeus (aka Linne)
 
> 10 Made with coconut milk, potatoes and nuts, Massaman curry originated in which Asian country?
 
Thailand
 
 
Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q5 Q6 Q7 Q8 Q9 Q10 TOTAL TB Quiz 546
0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 8 32 Bruce Bowler
1 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 7 28 Mark Brader
0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 5 20 Erland S
0 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 5 21 Pete Gayde
0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 5 23 Dan Blum
1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 4 18 Dan Tilque
- - - - - - - - - - --- ----------
2 4 6 3 0 5 3 3 5 3 34 57%
 
Congratulations Bruce.
 
cheers,
calvin
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Dec 06 06:58PM -0600

"Calvin":
> > 4 Which 3 homophones make the list of the 200 most commonly used English words?
 
> To, too, two
 
Really! When I saw people trying "there, their, they're", I was sure
that was going to be the right answer. I would not have thought that
"two" would be so common (and I also don't think "to" really qualifies
as a homophone of it).
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "This man must be very ignorant, for he answers
msb@vex.net | every question he is asked." -- Voltaire
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
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