Tuesday, August 23, 2016

The Frontstretch Newsletter: Will Power Wins Rain-delayed ABC Supply 500 at Pocono

THE FRONTSTRETCH NEWSLETTER
Presented by Frontstretch.com
The Best Seat at the Track, The Best View on the Net!
Aug. 23, 2016
Volume X, Edition CXLIV
~~~~~~~~~~~~
What to Watch: Tuesday

- Today, a number of Sprint Cup teams will test at Chicagoland Speedway ahead of next month's Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 400.  Drivers scheduled to participate include Kevin Harvick, Ricky Stenhouse, Jr., Kyle Busch, Ryan Blaney, Joey Logano, David Ragan, Ryan Newman, Chris Buescher, Brian Scott, Jimmie Johnson, Martin Truex, Jr. and Michael McDowell.  Fans with proof of ticket purchase for the race can watch the test for free at the track. 

- Meanwhile, a second day of testing is underway at New Hampshire Motor Speedway for Camping World Truck Series rookies only.  William Byron and Stewart Friesen are just two of the drivers that are on-site having it (in Friesen's case, he may be a bit sore after flipping a sprint car at Lebanon Valley Speedway last night).

~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Tuesday's TV Schedule can be found here.
 
Top News
by the Frontstretch Staff

Will Power Wins at Pocono Raceway, Cuts into Simon Pagenaud's Championship Lead

On Monday, Team Penske's Will Power overcame a handling issue that prevented him from running in packs early on to win the rain-delayed Verizon IndyCar Series' ABC Supply 500 at Pocono Raceway.  Mikhail Aleshin was second, followed by Ryan Hunter-Reay, who started last.  Read more

Alexander Rossi Launches Over Helio Castroneves in Pit Road Crash

Pit road issues in INDYCAR continued on Monday when Alexander Rossi was released from his pit into Charlie Kimball.  Rossi's No. 98 launched into the air and came down on top of Helio Castroneves.  It was a scary incident, but no one was injured.  Read more

Ryan Hunter-Reay, Mikhail Aleshin Come Up Short of Pocono Victory

While Will Power walked out of Pocono Raceway with the trophy, the fastest cars on-track all day long belonged to Mikhail Aleshin and Ryan Hunter-Reay.  Aleshin was fast all day and led 87 laps, while Hunter-Reay started last and charged to the lead in less than 50 laps.  Read more

Simon Pagenaud Crashes, Impacts Championship Picture in Pocono

Simon Pagenaud's Monday at Pocono Raceway was mediocre at best.  Then, things turned downright horrid when Pagenaud crashed exiting turn 1 with 42 laps to go, ending his day and allowing his rivals to take huge chunks out of his points lead.  Read more

Takuma Sato Crashes Out Early in Pocono

On Saturday, Takuma Sato qualified third quickest and looked for the race.  His race on Monday ended up lasting less than five of the scheduled 500 miles before he lost control and slammed into the turn 3 SAFER Barrier.  Read more


Have news for The Frontstretch?  Don't hesitate to let us know; email us at phil.allaway@frontstretch.com with a promising lead or tip.

~~~~~~~~~~
Today's Featured Commentary
NASCAR Olympiad Update from Mid-Ohio
Sitting in the Stands: A Fan's View
by S.D. Grady

Last week, Rick Hendrick sat next to William Byron in the media center at Bristol to make a formal announcement of Byron's ascension into the XFINITY Series for 2017. Some eyebrows raised and there was a flurry of excitement in the Twittersphere.  What was all the excitement about?  Of course Byron should be moving up next year. He's had a blistering rookie season in the Camping World Truck Series with five wins and an average finish of 8.4. He is almost guaranteed to win the championship.

What snagged everyone's attention was the fact that Byron currently drives for Kyle Busch Motorsports in the Liberty University No. 9 Toyota.  With his promotion, he'll be piloting a Chevrolet for the direct competitor of Joe Gibbs Racing.  Byron had essentially defected from the most successful development program in NASCAR and opted for a future with the stable that has won 242 times in the Sprint Cup Series.  Does this move most benefit Byron or Hendrick?

There's no doubt that Rick Hendrick is looking to the future of his Four Horsemen.  While vehement denials continue to be issued by Dale Earnhardt, Jr. and HMS that the driver of the No. 88 might not return at all, more than a few people are wondering if his recent struggle with the concussion symptoms might herald an earlier retirement than recently anticipated.  Meanwhile, Jimmie Johnson is no longer a spring chicken, either.  Yes, he may be seeking a seventh cup for his mantelpiece, but he's no longer a driver in his 30's. Time has a nasty way of pulling punches once you hit 40.

Then there's Kasey Kahne--the driver of the "non" R&D No. 5.  The adorable one has a healthy 17 wins.  However, he has only cracked the top 10 in points three times in his twelve year Cup career.  He's not considered the cream of the crop, but simply one of the few that regularly participate in the top 15.  At some point, sponsors are going to want a little more bang for their buck when they put their name on the fourth car in the Hendrick stable.

So, yes, Rick Hendrick needed to do something.  And in waltzed the clean cut kid with the shock of blonde hair and an easy smile. Like Jeff Gordon and Kasey Kahne, Byron oozes an all-American kind of persona.  In short, he's a perfect fit for the Hendrick orthodontically approved seat, besides the fact that he can actually drive.

On Byron's side...well, his current boss doesn't personally own an XFINITY team.  In fact, Kyle Busch is often found piloting the Gibbs second-tier machine.  When the Gibbs "development" program relies on placing their Cup drivers in XFINITY cars constantly, that leaves that much less room for a young kid to sharpen their skills before reaching for a seat in Cup.

So, when that good looking kid hops into a JR Motorsports car next season, understand that his future has just about been green lighted for a fast track into a Cup ride.  And both Hendrick and Byron got the best deal available.

SOMETHING SHINY

In an attempt to add a viable bottom groove to Bristol Motor Speedway, track officials added a product they referred to as rosin to the inner lane.  The sticky substance certainly did the trick, as we were treated to two and three wide racing all weekend long.  I just wonder if we entered into the next era of track maintenance.  Treat the surface differently each race to generate new lanes and strategies among the teams.  Is that tampering or promoting?

S.D. Grady is a Senior Writer for Frontstretch and runs a NASCAR blog called the S-Curves. She can be reached via email at sonya.grady@frontstretch.com. Follow her on Twitter at @laregna and on her Facebook page (she's an author, too!) at https://www.facebook.com/Author.SDGrady.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

TODAY AT FRONTSTRETCH:

by Danny Peters

by Matt McLaughlin

by Jeff Wolfe

The Underdog House: Tracking NASCAR's Small Teams From Bristol to Michigan
by Amy Henderson


~~~~~~~~~
FRONTSTRETCH TRIVIA:

Q: Formula One returns to Spa for the Belgium Grand Prix this weekend.  Literally anything can happen there.  The 1998 race is infamous for the start.  What happened?

Check back Tuesday for the answer, here in the Frontstretch Newsletter!

Monday's Answer:

Q:  Open-wheeled 500-mile races tend to be very difficult events.  One false move and you're done.  There also seem to be races every few years where attrition is a factor.  The 1994 Marlboro 500 was one of those races at Michigan.  Scott Goodyear earned his final CART victory, but he earned it due to a quirky circumstance.  What happened?

A: Goodyear took over the lead on lap 227 as a result of the top two drivers in the race (Raul Boesel and Al Unser, Jr.) blowing engines within laps of each other.  The expirations can be seen here.

Goodyear ended up with a one-lap lead over Dominic Dobson and Arie Luyendyk, allowing him to breeze to victory.  It was the only victory for car owner Kenny Bernstein in open-wheel racing.
~~~~~~~~~~
COMING TOMORROW
In The Frontstretch Newsletter:
We'll have the latest NASCAR news along with a weekly commentary from our Professor of Speed on the state of the sport.

On Frontstretch.com:
Amy Henderson returns with the weekly Frontstretch 5.
 -----------------------------
Talk back to the Frontstretch Newsletter!
Got something to say about an article you've seen in the newsletter? It's as easy as replying directly to this message or sending an email to editors@frontstretch.com. We'll take the best comments and publish them here! 
©2016 Frontstretch.com

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Digest for rec.games.trivia@googlegroups.com - 3 updates in 1 topic

bbowler <bbowler@bigelow.org>: Aug 22 05:20PM

On Sun, 21 Aug 2016 18:46:35 -0500, Mark Brader wrote:
 
 
 
> 2. A prusik ["PRUSS-ik"; spell it] is a type of what? Supposedly
> it was invented around 1931 by an Austrian mountaineer of the same
> name.
 
It's a knot
 
> used for connecting and disconnecting mountaineering equipment? It is
> also widely used in other situations, with larger-sized types used
> even to connect hot-air balloons to the basket.
 
Caribeener
 
> activities such as caving and canyoning) for descending a vertical
> drop by using a rope, often with other equipment such as a harness
> and a device to play out the rope?
 
rappelling
 
> 5. What technique or action is involved in a glissade ["gliss-AD"
> or "gliss-AID"]?
 
Moving sideways across a sheer face
 
> 6. What is the metal spike driven into a crack or seam in rocks
> so that it can act as an anchor?
 
piton
 
> ascent of Mt. Everest in June 1924. They are known to have come
> within 800 feet of the summit, leading to ongoing speculation about
> whether they got there. One of their bodies was found in 1999.
 
Mallory
 
> 9. Within one year, in what year did Tenzing Norgay and Edmund
> Hillary make the first recorded ascent to the summit of Everest?
 
1956
 
> later named after him? It is not, as was thought at the time, the
> tallest mountain in the Rockies, but it is 13,745 feet or almost
> 4,200 m high.
 
Zebulon Pike
Calvin <334152@gmail.com>: Aug 22 03:48PM -0700

On Monday, August 22, 2016 at 9:46:41 AM UTC+10, Mark Brader wrote:

> I did not write either of these rounds.
 
Nor did I.
 
> Alone and palely loitering?
 
> What does ail him, or rather *who*, according to John Keats?
> The title of the poem gives your answer.
 
Nightingale
 
> activities such as caving and canyoning) for descending a
> vertical drop by using a rope, often with other equipment such
> as a harness and a device to play out the rope?
 
Abseiling
 
 
 
> 7. Give either of the two terms for loose, broken rock at the
> bottoms of cliffs, volcanoes, and valleys. Which term applies
> in a given situation depends on the size of the rock.
 
Scree
 
> in 1999.
 
> 9. Within one year, in what year did Tenzing Norgay and Edmund
> Hillary make the first recorded ascent to the summit of Everest?
 
1953
 
> that was later named after him? It is not, as was thought
> at the time, the tallest mountain in the Rockies, but it is
> 13,745 feet or almost 4,200 m high.
 
McClellan
 
cheers,
calvin
Pete <pagrsg@wowway.com>: Aug 23 06:53AM

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote in news:cP2dnTMoB_nGoCfKnZ2dnUU7-
> death. After all, a mere friend isn't as important as a wife,
> is he? Name this play from 1955, in which love goes wrong for
> pretty much everybody.
 
Splendor in the Grass
 
> Christopher Plummer won a Tony, and José Ferrer won an Oscar,
> each for portraying which hero, originally of an 1897 play of
> the same name, who reveals his love only as he is dying?
 
Cyrano de Bergerac
 
 
> 2. A prusik ["PRUSS-ik"; spell it] is a type of what? Supposedly
> it was invented around 1931 by an Austrian mountaineer of the
> same name.
 
Boot
 
> activities such as caving and canyoning) for descending a
> vertical drop by using a rope, often with other equipment such
> as a harness and a device to play out the rope?
 
Belaying
 
> or "gliss-AID"]?
 
> 6. What is the metal spike driven into a crack or seam in rocks
> so that it can act as an anchor?
 
Peton
 
 
> 7. Give either of the two terms for loose, broken rock at the
> bottoms of cliffs, volcanoes, and valleys. Which term applies
> in a given situation depends on the size of the rock.
 
Slurry
 
> in 1999.
 
> 9. Within one year, in what year did Tenzing Norgay and Edmund
> Hillary make the first recorded ascent to the summit of Everest?
 
1954
 
> that was later named after him? It is not, as was thought
> at the time, the tallest mountain in the Rockies, but it is
> 13,745 feet or almost 4,200 m high.
 
Pete Gayde
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Monday, August 22, 2016

The Frontstretch Newsletter: Kevin Harvick Conquers Marathon Day at Bristol; Follow FS For Live IndyCar Coverage!

THE FRONTSTRETCH NEWSLETTER
Presented by Frontstretch.com
The Best Seat at the Track, The Best View on the Net!
Aug. 22, 2016
Volume X, Edition CXLIII

~~~~~~~~~~~~
What to Watch: Monday

- Today, the Verizon IndyCar Series will contest the ABC Supply 500 at Pocono Raceway.  The race, which was rained out completely on Sunday, will air live at Noon ET on NBCSN.

Follow along with Frontstretch reporters Joe Wolkin and Zach Catanzareti! We'll have updates on our Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram as well as their Twitter accounts:

Joe Wolkin: @JosephNASCAR
Zach Catanzareti: @ZachRacing
~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Monday's TV Schedule can be found here.
 
Top News
by the Frontstretch Staff

Kevin Harvick Reigns Supreme in Rain-Postponed Bristol Night Race

After weather pushed the Bass Pro Shops NRA Night Race from a Saturday night to late Sunday afternoon start, Kevin Harvick took over up front when Kyle Busch suffered mechanical failure and claimed his second win of 2016.  Ricky Stenhouse, Jr. equaled his career-best finish in second followed by Denny Hamlin, Austin Dillon and Chris Buescher.  Read more

Harvick, Stewart Share Frontstretch Celebration at Bristol

After Kevin Harvick took the checkered flag on Sunday, Harvick and teammate/car owner Tony Stewart collaborated on a special post-race dual donut celebration.  The occasion marked Stewart's final start at Bristol.  Read more

Kyle Busch Critical of Equipment, Justin Allgaier Following Bristol Crash

Kyle Busch had the strongest car Sunday, leading well over 150 laps until a failure in the left rear caused him to spin.  Afterwards, Busch was not so happy with his equipment, then ranted against HScott Motorsports driver Justin Allgaier and his spotter for Allgaier hitting him.  Read more

Ricky Stenhouse, Jr., Ends Emotional Tribute to Bryan Clauson with Second-Place Run

Bristol is one of Ricky Stenhouse, Jr.'s best tracks.  On Sunday, he wore a helmet painted up in one of Bryan Clauson's paint schemes to a second-place finish, tying a career-best.  Read more


Pocono Winner Chris Buescher Enters Top 30 in Points After Bristol Top Five

For Chris Buescher, winning was just one aspect of what he needed to do in order to qualify for the Chase.  He also needed to get into the top 30 in points.  Buescher did that in style on Sunday, bringing the Front Row Motorsports No. 34 home in fifth.  Read more

Matt Tifft Details Recovery, Announces Upcoming Test at Hickory Speedway

On Friday, Matt Tifft held a press conference at Bristol Motor Speedway to talk about his ongoing recovery.  He's been cleared to drive and will test today at Hickory Motor Speedway in preparation for his return to racing.  Read more

Austin Dillon Outlasts the Field for Food City 300 Win

Austin Dillon assumed the lead under caution with just a few laps to go when Brad Keselowski ran out of gas.  From there, Dillon held off the pack to take his first career win at Bristol.  Justin Allgaier was second, followed by Kyle Larson, Elliott Sadler, Brendan Gaughan and Jeremy Clements.  Read more

Kyle Busch, Brad Keselowski Crash Battling for the Win at Bristol

Late in Friday night's Food City 300, it appears that Sprint Cup veterans Kyle Busch and Brad Keselowski would fight it out for the win.  However, the two drivers collided on the backstretch, putting Busch into the wall and collecting Ty Dillon in the process.  Read more

Daniel Suarez, Erik Jones Collide in Late Crash at Bristol

Joe Gibbs Racing ended up with a terrible night Friday at Bristol.  Prior to Kyle Busch's crash mentioned above, teammates Daniel Suarez and Erik Jones collided entering turn 3, sparking a multi-car incident.  Read more


ABC Supply 500 at Pocono Postponed to Monday Due to Inclement Weather

Sunday's ABC Supply 500 for the Verizon IndyCar Series was completely washed out by rain, the third straight major Pocono race to be postponed.  Mikhail Aleshin will lead the field to green this afternoon.  Read more

Have news for The Frontstretch?  Don't hesitate to let us know; email us at phil.allaway@frontstretch.com with a promising lead or tip.

~~~~~~~~~~
Chasing the Chase: Harvick Retakes Points Lead, Nearest Opponents Suffer Setbacks
by Phil Allaway

If there were no Chase in Sprint Cup, Sunday's race would have turned the point standings upside-down.  Kevin Harvick took his second victory of the year on Sunday while Brad Keselowski got caught up in the big crash late in the going.  The result was a 36-point swing.  Harvick entered Bristol nine points behind and exited up 27.  Kurt Busch was leading when he got loose exiting turn 2 on lap 373, sparking the big crash.  He ended up finishing 38th, which did not cost him a spot in points.  It did put him 70 points out of the lead, though.  Carl Edwards gained one spot to fourth after finishing sixth.

Joey Logano struggled with an ill-handling car at times, but managed to drag it to the front.  Later, he fell down the order and finished tenth.  That was still enough to boost him up to fifth in points.  Kyle Busch's mechanical failure and crash resulted in a 39th-place finish.  That dropped him two places to sixth.  Denny Hamlin's third-place finish didn't move him up a spot, but did move him closer to Kyle Busch.  Martin Truex, Jr. was once again a victim after Justin Allgaier hit him.  Truex finished 23rd, four laps down and lost significant ground to his rivals.

Jimmie Johnson had a relatively quiet day on Sunday, but managed to pull out a seventh-place finish.  That lifted him up one place to ninth in the standings.  That place came at the expense of Matt Kenseth, who was caught up in the big crash and finished 37th.  Austin Dillon's fourth-place finish moved him up two places to 11th.  Dillon is eight points in front of Chase Elliott, who faded after getting damage in the big crash to 15th.

Jamie McMurray finished a decent eighth on Sunday, which moved him up a spot to 13th.  Ryan Newman was a big loser on Sunday, hitting the wall and having a miserable day.  His 28th-place finish, 13 laps down cost him three spots.  He is now the last driver in the Chase on points.  However, Newman has a healthy 35 point lead over Trevor BayneKyle Larson and Kasey Kahne are another four points back.

Tony Stewart spent significant time behind the wall replacing the right rear hub and assembly.  Because of that, he finished 30th and dropped to 27th in points, still locked into the Chase for now.  Stewart has been joined by Chris Buescher, whose fifth-place finish on Sunday moved him up to 30th in points, 13 ahead of David Ragan.

Point Standings (1-16): 1) Kevin Harvick 762, 2) Brad Keselowski -27, 3) Kurt Busch -70, 4) Carl Edwards -73, 5) Joey Logano -78, 6) Kyle Busch -88, 7) Denny Hamlin -103, 8) Martin Truex, Jr. -132, 9) Jimmie Johnson -150, 10) Matt Kenseth -158, 11) Austin Dillon -166, 12) Chase Elliott -174, 13) Jamie McMurray -179, 14) Ryan Newman -186, 15) Trevor Bayne -221, t-16) Kyle Larson -225, t-16) Kasey Kahne -225.

Outside the top 16, but Chase-eligible: 27) Tony Stewart -362, 30) Chris Buescher -434

Race Winners: Denny Hamlin (Daytona-1, Watkins Glen), Jimmie Johnson (Atlanta, Auto Club), Brad Keselowski (Las Vegas, Talladega, Daytona-2, Kentucky), Kevin Harvick (Phoenix, Bristol-2), Kyle Busch (Martinsville, Texas, Kansas, Indianapolis), Carl Edwards (Bristol-1, Richmond), Matt Kenseth (Dover, Loudon), Martin Truex, Jr. (Charlotte), Kurt Busch (Pocono-1), Joey Logano (Michigan), Tony Stewart (Sonoma), Chris Buescher (Pocono-2)
 
Phil Allaway is the Newsletter Manager and a Senior Writer for Frontstretch.com.  He can be reached via e-mail at ashland10@mail.com.
~~~~~~~~~~

Letter of the Race: Sunday's Bass Pro Shops NRA Night Race was presented to you by the letter "F," for Forces.  Bristol is a nasty track when it comes to the forces rendered onto parts.  Kyle Busch's day came to an end when he had a failure in the left rear that lead to him spinning out.  Getting piled into by Justin Allgaier did not help things at all.  - Phil Allaway

~~~~~~~~~~

Quotes to Remember: Bass Pro Shops NRA Night Race
compiled by Phil Allaway

"Yeah, just really from the drop of the green flag, the car was really fast.  Our strong point was the top groove in 3 and 4.  Our weak point was being a little bit too free on restarts.  But I think as the runs would go, our car would just keep turning, and I think that was really our advantage.

"For me, I was excited that you were able to use the bottom of the racetrack, and the lap cars had an option.  You just didn't get pinned up high.  Really just want to applaud the racetrack for the effort that they made this weekend to really get that bottom groove working so that we had multiple grooves of racing, and I think today as a driver you had a lot of options to make your car work and maneuver through traffic and make up positions.  We started 24th and pretty much drove through the field because of that.

"I think Friday night was probably one of the best XFINITY races I've ever sat and watched.  Just really, really happy to see Bristol back where it is this weekend, and looking forward to coming back and obviously coming to victory lane is always exciting.  It's been a decade since I've been to victory lane here, and I know this is the race that he had circled on the calendar every year.  I was like, really, you're going to circle that one?  But it's definitely added some excitement for me over the last three years to come back to Bristol knowing how much it meant to him, and that's what motivated me.

"They give me great cars to drive, and tonight was no different." - Kevin Harvick, race winner

"It wasn't from a lack of hard work and being lucky a few times.  We really wanted to get this Bryan Clauson tribute car in victory lane.  It just wasn't meant to be today.  We made our car a lot faster throughout the race and came from two laps down to get back on the lead lap.  We missed some wrecks and gave it all we had.  I thought we were matching the 4 car there lap for lap, but he got away from us and we had to restart sixth there on that last restart, but it was an honor to drive this car.  All of the fans that came out this weekend.  This place was pretty packed last night.  Thanks to all the fans that were able to stay around.  I thought the track was really good.  You could run the bottom.  You could run the top.  We just wanted one more spot." - Ricky Stenhouse, Jr., finished second

"Yeah, we had a great car. We definitely got it a lot better there at the end and proud that we're able to come back from two laps down and get a good finish out of it, but still a good overall day for our FedEx Express Camry. Just came up a little short." - Denny Hamlin, finished third

"Well, it was challenging for our Dow Chevy. We really didn't have a car capable of winning the race, I don't think. We just struggled. My arms are worn out; I know that. But, I'm proud of the adjustments the guys made. One heck of a pit stop. My guys really helped us out with that and gained us some spots there to have that outside restart. And, it was fun there, you could tell I was a little tighter than (Kevin) Harvick there on the bottom, so I got to him there. Early in the run he jumped to the top and pulled me. It was fun here at Bristol, today. I'm glad that Bristol tried to get that bottom working. I think we can do a little bit more for it because that top is going to be dominant as it runs. It was a fun race." - Austin Dillon, finished fourth

"That was a lot of fun.  It's been a long time since we've come to the race track and enjoy it like that.  We had awesome speed out of our Love's Ford Fusion.  I'm really proud of the team.  This thing was good from the start of the weekend.  We kept working our way up towards the end and got to the top five, and almost got one there at the end, but I love Bristol.  I absolutely love this race track.  What they did with the surface worked out really well and made for some really good racing." - Chris Buescher, finished fifth

"It was a hard fought day.  We were just trying to get on either end of being a little bit too tight, a little bit too loose.  I thought we had kind of got in the happy medium.  We made the car as good as it could be with what we had right there.  Just tricky race track today.  At one point you would get the bottom rolling and think that is pretty good and then it goes away and try to find out how to run the top.  We weren't as good on the top and then I kind of figured something out late, but just a tricky race track, hard fought.  A little bit fortunate to miss a couple of those crashes.  I wish we would have had about 15 more laps at the end because I thought I had figured something out, but it is what it is, a top 10.  We've had some days where we feel like we should have gotten more and gotten stolen from us.  We will take a day like this." - AJ Allmendinger, finished ninth

"It was eventful Bristol.  It seems like at this race track there's always something that happens.  Whether it's on the team side or the driver's side it seems like that happens a lot at this race track.  There was a point during the race at about lap 400 where we got to the lead with the Shell/Pennzoil Ford and we were fast.  The race track was where we thought it would be and everything was kind of working as planned, and the next thing you know the 41 spun and we got some damage from that.  We pitted for that and had a lugnut off the left-rear, so we came in to fix that, and then it rained and the track just changed.  After it rained everything changed and the car wasn't as fast.  We got back up to 10th and I thought we were gonna drive to fifth on that last run because we were really fast the run before when the track was rubbered up, but once it cleaned up we just lost a little bit of speed." - Joey Logano, finished tenth

"I would have liked to have done it last night, but I'm glad we got this in.  I'm appreciative to the fans that stayed last night.  I know it's taxing on a lot of them, but we appreciate the fact that they stayed to watch.

"That is cool.  The funny part is [Harvick] got out of his car, got the flag and then he goes 'get in my car and go to Victory Lane with me.'  I went what?  He goes 'yeah, just leave yours here.'  I'm like I just can't just leave my car there, but that was cool.  I'm happy for these guys.  This is a hard place to win at.  There are so many things that can go wrong.  All it takes is one thing.  I mean we had a wheel that was loose and that messed our whole day up.  That was cool sharing that moment with him though." - Tony Stewart, finished 30th

"Something happened to the 41 in front of his and he got sideways.  I don't know if he had contact with Joey or if he just got loose, but once he got sideways we were already all kind of digging and I never saw him until I was in his door.  It was a heavy hit.  I hope Kurt's alright.  I guess maybe I hit him more in the left-rear than the door, but it's a shame.  We had been working on the Autotrader Ford and we had gotten it up towards the front.  We had a lot of short run speed and we were hoping the race would play out that way at the end and we would have had a shot at it, if that was the case, but instead we're here in the garage.  We'll try to get a finish out of it, but a bummer day for us." - Brad Keselowski, finished 33rd

"I don't know what happened.  I was watching the replay in there and somebody got loose.  We were trying to make ground on the top and before I knew it the 20 was sitting sideways in front of me and I hit him pretty hard.  It's unfortunate.  We had a really good car early and lost some spots on pit road being in bad spots and kind of lost our car a little bit halfway through, but got it back and thought we were just starting to make ground up and got in that wreck.  I want to thank Virginia Tech and Ford and Motorcraft and Quick Lane for what they do.  That definitely hurts, especially when you have a good car, but we'll just go on to next week." - Ryan Blaney, finished 35th

"I didn't really see what happened except for there was cars wrecking up there and I slowed down as much as the guy in front of me. I couldn't slow down any less than that or I would hit him. Chase (Elliott) bust out of nowhere, ran me over and 21 (Ryan Blaney) came through there wide open – I still don't know if he's lifted yet or not – and finished us off. As the wreck happened, you've got to slow down. Just not much I could do." - Matt Kenseth, finished 37th (Crashed Out)

"I don't know. It's a shame. The last few times we've been here, we've had really fast M&M's Toyota Camrys and we haven't been able to finish. We've been having parts failures here, so something we've got to address and fix. I'm really tired of losing races here with parts falling apart, so they'll hear about it on Tuesday. But the person that's really the biggest moron out there is the spotter of the 46 and the driver of the 46 (Justin Allgaier). I've been wrecking for half a lap and they just come on through and clean us out. That's stupid, so I don't know – frustrating day. Let's go home." - Kyle Busch, finished 39th (Crashed Out)

"Well from my point of view we got done in the corner.  I was trying to let the leaders go as best I could.  We were a couple laps down right there and let them go.  The No. 22 (Joey Logano) ducked in front of me getting into (Turn) 1 and I had to jam on the brakes pretty hard.  I got really loose and I was just trying to catch it.  That is when the spotter was telling me that the No. 18 (Kyle Busch) was spinning and he kept rolling down the hill so at first I committed to go below him because I was already on the bottom and then he was still coming down the hill so I tried to go out around the outside of him and unfortunately I just didn't make it.  The No. 22 was right there and just really a shame.  I hate it for these guys. This Pilot Flying J No. 46 team they did a good job all day.  We weren't up there battling for the lead, but we had a good solid day going.  I just cost us a decent finish. Thanks to them for letting me drive the car today.  Sorry to Kyle (Busch) that is the worst possibly scenario when the leader spins out and you hit them.  Just really frustrating." - Justin Allgaier, finished 40th (Crashed Out)

Phil Allaway is the Newsletter Manager and a Senior Writer for Frontstretch.com.  He can be reached via e-mail at 
phil.allaway@frontstretch.com.

~~~~~~~~~~

TODAY AT FRONTSTRETCH:

Thinkin' Out Loud – Kevin Harvick Wins 24 Hours of Bristol


~~~~~~~~~
FRONTSTRETCH TRIVIA:

Q: Open-wheeled 500-mile races tend to be very difficult events.  One false move and you're done.  There also seem to be races every few years where attrition is a factor.  The 1994 Marlboro 500 was one of those races at Michigan.  Scott Goodyear earned his final CART victory, but he earned it due to a quirky circumstance.  What happened?

Check back Tuesday for the answer, here in the Frontstretch Newsletter!

Friday's Answer:

Q:  The 1995 Goody's 500 is best known for Terry Labonte wrecking at the line to take the win (and also the water bottle incident between Dale Earnhardt and Rusty Wallace).  However, Bill Elliott also took a pretty big hit exiting turn 2 in that race.  What happened?

A: Elliott was running 11th when he cut a right front tire in turn 2.  The McDonald's Ford went up and hit the wall hard just past the crossover gate.  The design of the wall put Elliott up on two wheels briefly before coming down on all fours.  The crash can be seen here.

~~~~~~~~~~
COMING TOMORROW

In The Frontstretch Newsletter:
We'll have breaking news from Monday, Tom Bowles gives you a stats breakdown of Bristol in Numbers Game and S.D. Grady returns with Sitting In The Stands: A Fan's View.

On Frontstretch.com:
Danny Peters returns with Five Points to Ponder following Sunday's action in Bristol.
 -----------------------------
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Digest for rec.games.trivia@googlegroups.com - 8 updates in 4 topics

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Aug 21 06:46PM -0500

These questions were written to be asked in Toronto on 2016-06-27,
and should be interpreted accordingly.
 
On each question you may give up to two answers, but if you give
both a right answer and a wrong answer, there is a small penalty.
Please post all your answers to the newsgroup in a single followup,
based only on your own knowledge. (In your answer posting, quote
the questions and place your answer below each one.) I will reveal
the correct answers in about 2 or 3 weeks.
 
All questions were written by members of the Usual Suspects and
are used here by permission, but have been reformatted and may
have been retyped and/or edited by me. For further information
see my 2016-05-31 companion posting on "Questions from the Canadian
Inquisition (QFTCI*)".
 
 
I did not write either of these rounds.
 
 
* Game 6, Round 4 - Literature - Love Laments
 
As the song says, "When love goes wrong, nothing goes right."
Here are some sad examples of just how often that happens.
 
For the first few questions we'll give you a few poetic lines --
though we won't necessarily recite them soulfully -- and then,
in each case, we'll bring you back to earth.
 
1. O what can ail thee, knight-at-arms
Alone and palely loitering?
 
What does ail him, or rather *who*, according to John Keats?
The title of the poem gives your answer.
 
 
2. I could not love thee, Dear, so much,
Loved I not Honour more.
 
Despite those fine words, Richard Lovelace is still leaving
Lucasta. *Why*? Again the answer is in the title of the poem,
but this time we'll accept a paraphrase.
 
 
3. When lovely woman stoops to folly
And finds too late that men betray, --
What charm can soothe her melancholy,
What art can wash her guilt away?
 
What's the solution to this quandary, in the opinion of the
poet, Oliver Goldsmith? This time the answer is in the poem's
last line, and we wouldn't actually recommend it as a course
of action.
 
 
4. In the merry month of May,
The green buds were a-swelling.
Sweet William on his deathbed lay
For love of...
 
But when the hardhearted heroine of this ballad came to his
bedside, all she said to the man who loved her was: "Young man,
I think you're dying". Name her.
 
 
Okay, that's enough poetic readings.
 
5. "And all men kill the thing they love" is a dire warning from
which writer, best known as a playwright?
 
6. Married to a doctor who doesn't fulfill her dreams of romance
and luxury, abandoned by her lover, our heroine takes arsenic.
Which protagonist of an 1856 novel are we talking about?
 
7. Our hero thinks he's got it made when he attracts the attention
of a girl who's both beautiful and wealthy. Life would be great
if only the other girl, who he's seduced and impregnated, wasn't
poor and didn't insist on marrying him. Do you seriously think
this is going to end well, especially when they go out in a canoe
on a secluded part of the lake? No, that's not your question.
On film it became "A Place in the Sun", but your question is,
what was the title of the original 1925 novel?
 
8. She married the local football star, but he ignores her and
drinks far too much. And he seems way too upset by Skipper's
death. After all, a mere friend isn't as important as a wife,
is he? Name this play from 1955, in which love goes wrong for
pretty much everybody.
 
9. Heartbreak is painful but it does make good material for actors.
Christopher Plummer won a Tony, and José Ferrer won an Oscar,
each for portraying which hero, originally of an 1897 play of
the same name, who reveals his love only as he is dying?
 
10. Lily Bart is a penniless orphan who needs to marry someone
with money. Unfortunately, she can't bring herself to do it,
maybe because she's in love with a poor man. An overdose
of laudanum ensues. Agent Scully played the doomed heroine
on the big screen in 2000, and a fine performance it was.
Name the novel, written in 1905.
 
 
* Game 6, Round 6 - Sports - Mountaineering
 
This round is about technical terms in mountaineering, as well as
the history of the sport.
 
1. What English synonym for mountaineering has cognates in French
and Spanish and reflects the sport's long history on the
European continent?
 
2. A prusik ["PRUSS-ik"; spell it] is a type of what? Supposedly
it was invented around 1931 by an Austrian mountaineer of the
same name.
 
3. What is the name for a metal loop with a spring-loaded "gate",
used for connecting and disconnecting mountaineering equipment?
It is also widely used in other situations, with larger-sized
types used even to connect hot-air balloons to the basket.
 
4. What is the term in mountaineering (and also in related
activities such as caving and canyoning) for descending a
vertical drop by using a rope, often with other equipment such
as a harness and a device to play out the rope?
 
5. What technique or action is involved in a glissade ["gliss-AD"
or "gliss-AID"]?
 
6. What is the metal spike driven into a crack or seam in rocks
so that it can act as an anchor?
 
7. Give either of the two terms for loose, broken rock at the
bottoms of cliffs, volcanoes, and valleys. Which term applies
in a given situation depends on the size of the rock.
 
8. Name *either one* of the two British climbers who died on an
ascent of Mt. Everest in June 1924. They are known to have come
within 800 feet of the summit, leading to ongoing speculation
about whether they got there. One of their bodies was found
in 1999.
 
9. Within one year, in what year did Tenzing Norgay and Edmund
Hillary make the first recorded ascent to the summit of Everest?
 
10. Who was the Civil War general, unsuccessful presidential
candidate, and explorer who in 1842 climbed a Wyoming peak
that was later named after him? It is not, as was thought
at the time, the tallest mountain in the Rockies, but it is
13,745 feet or almost 4,200 m high.
 
--
Mark Brader | "...she was quite surprised to find that she remained
Toronto | the same size: to be sure, this generally happens
msb@vex.net | when one eats cake, but..." --Lewis Carroll
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
tool@panix.com (Dan Blum): Aug 22 12:17AM

> Alone and palely loitering?
 
> What does ail him, or rather *who*, according to John Keats?
> The title of the poem gives your answer.
 
La Belle Dame Sans Merci
 
 
> But when the hardhearted heroine of this ballad came to his
> bedside, all she said to the man who loved her was: "Young man,
> I think you're dying". Name her.
 
Barbara Allen
 
> 5. "And all men kill the thing they love" is a dire warning from
> which writer, best known as a playwright?
 
Shakespeare; Marlowe
 
> 6. Married to a doctor who doesn't fulfill her dreams of romance
> and luxury, abandoned by her lover, our heroine takes arsenic.
> Which protagonist of an 1856 novel are we talking about?
 
Madame Bovary
 
> death. After all, a mere friend isn't as important as a wife,
> is he? Name this play from 1955, in which love goes wrong for
> pretty much everybody.
 
A Streetcar Named Desire
 
> Christopher Plummer won a Tony, and Jos? Ferrer won an Oscar,
> each for portraying which hero, originally of an 1897 play of
> the same name, who reveals his love only as he is dying?
 
Cyrano de Bergerac
 
 
> 2. A prusik ["PRUSS-ik"; spell it] is a type of what? Supposedly
> it was invented around 1931 by an Austrian mountaineer of the
> same name.
 
boot; hammer
 
> used for connecting and disconnecting mountaineering equipment?
> It is also widely used in other situations, with larger-sized
> types used even to connect hot-air balloons to the basket.
 
carabinier
 
> activities such as caving and canyoning) for descending a
> vertical drop by using a rope, often with other equipment such
> as a harness and a device to play out the rope?
 
absailing
 
> 6. What is the metal spike driven into a crack or seam in rocks
> so that it can act as an anchor?
 
piton
 
> 7. Give either of the two terms for loose, broken rock at the
> bottoms of cliffs, volcanoes, and valleys. Which term applies
> in a given situation depends on the size of the rock.
 
scree
 
> 9. Within one year, in what year did Tenzing Norgay and Edmund
> Hillary make the first recorded ascent to the summit of Everest?
 
1953
 
> that was later named after him? It is not, as was thought
> at the time, the tallest mountain in the Rockies, but it is
> 13,745 feet or almost 4,200 m high.
 
Fremont
 
--
_______________________________________________________________________
Dan Blum tool@panix.com
"I wouldn't have believed it myself if I hadn't just made it up."
Joshua Kreitzer <gromit82@hotmail.com>: Aug 22 12:30AM

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote in news:cP2dnTMoB_nGoCfKnZ2dnUU7-
> Alone and palely loitering?
 
> What does ail him, or rather *who*, according to John Keats?
> The title of the poem gives your answer.
 
La Belle Dame Sans Merci

> on a secluded part of the lake? No, that's not your question.
> On film it became "A Place in the Sun", but your question is,
> what was the title of the original 1925 novel?
 
"An American Tragedy"
 
> death. After all, a mere friend isn't as important as a wife,
> is he? Name this play from 1955, in which love goes wrong for
> pretty much everybody.
 
"Cat on a Hot Tin Roof"

> Christopher Plummer won a Tony, and José Ferrer won an Oscar,
> each for portraying which hero, originally of an 1897 play of
> the same name, who reveals his love only as he is dying?
 
Cyrano de Bergerac

 
> 1. What English synonym for mountaineering has cognates in French
> and Spanish and reflects the sport's long history on the
> European continent?
 
alpinism
 
> 6. What is the metal spike driven into a crack or seam in rocks
> so that it can act as an anchor?
 
piton
 
> within 800 feet of the summit, leading to ongoing speculation
> about whether they got there. One of their bodies was found
> in 1999.
 
Mallory

> 9. Within one year, in what year did Tenzing Norgay and Edmund
> Hillary make the first recorded ascent to the summit of Everest?
 
1952
 
> that was later named after him? It is not, as was thought
> at the time, the tallest mountain in the Rockies, but it is
> 13,745 feet or almost 4,200 m high.
 
Fremont
 
--
Joshua Kreitzer
gromit82@hotmail.com
Marc Dashevsky <usenet@MarcDashevsky.com>: Aug 22 01:44AM -0500

In article <cP2dnTMoB_nGoCfKnZ2dnUU7-IfNnZ2d@giganews.com>, msb@vex.net says...
 
> 6. Married to a doctor who doesn't fulfill her dreams of romance
> and luxury, abandoned by her lover, our heroine takes arsenic.
> Which protagonist of an 1856 novel are we talking about?
Madame Bovary
 
> Christopher Plummer won a Tony, and José Ferrer won an Oscar,
> each for portraying which hero, originally of an 1897 play of
> the same name, who reveals his love only as he is dying?
Cyrano de Bergerac
 
 
> 1. What English synonym for mountaineering has cognates in French
> and Spanish and reflects the sport's long history on the
> European continent?
Alpinism
 
> activities such as caving and canyoning) for descending a
> vertical drop by using a rope, often with other equipment such
> as a harness and a device to play out the rope?
rappel
 
> or "gliss-AID"]?
 
> 6. What is the metal spike driven into a crack or seam in rocks
> so that it can act as an anchor?
piton
 
> 7. Give either of the two terms for loose, broken rock at the
> bottoms of cliffs, volcanoes, and valleys. Which term applies
> in a given situation depends on the size of the rock.
scree
 
> in 1999.
 
> 9. Within one year, in what year did Tenzing Norgay and Edmund
> Hillary make the first recorded ascent to the summit of Everest?
1953
 
 
--
Replace "usenet" with "marc" in the e-mail address.
Calvin <334152@gmail.com>: Aug 21 11:13PM -0700

On Friday, August 19, 2016 at 5:44:17 PM UTC+10, Erland Sommarskog wrote:
> > Erland S
 
> Nope, I did not get this one right. I let me by lured by you parenthentical
> remark and answered Kazakhstan.
 
Noted thanks. Revised scores are:
 
Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q5 Q6 Q7 Q8 Q9 Q10 TOTAL TB Quiz 452
1 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 8 44 Gareth Owen
1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 7 41 Mark Brader
1 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 7 44 Joe
1 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 6 34 Peter Smyth
1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 6 39 Marc Dashevsky
1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 6 38 Pete Gayde
1 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 6 39 Chris Johnson
1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 4 28 Erland S
1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 3 22 Dan Tilque
- - - - - - - - - - --- ----------
9 4 4 6 5 1 8 4 7 5 53 59%
 
 
cheers,
calvin
Pete <pagrsg@wowway.com>: Aug 21 05:21PM

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote in news:5Y-dnUEm64nIsyvKnZ2dnUU7-
> forth on an open flat-car while other musicians stood beside
> the tracks. Either tell whose "effect" was confirmed, or
> describe it.
 
Doppler
 
> use a large pendulum to provide this proof?
 
> 5. In 1668 in Florence, Italy, Francesco Redi allowed meat to rot
> in a jar whose mouth was covered with a layer of gauze. Why?
 
To prove that maggots were not created from rotting meat
 
> the Leaning Tower of Pisa and dropped two balls to the ground.
> Whether he did it or not, what would this demonstration have
> proved?
 
That two objects of different mass would accelerate at the same rate.
 
> never happens in Alexandria. Based on the distance between
> the two places and some measurements he could make himself,
> what did he calculate?
 
Distance from the earth to the sun
 
> hemisphere, they did not have the strength to pull them apart;
> but then he operated a control and the hemispheres fell apart
> on their own. What had kept them together?
 
Vacuum
 
> were measuring how learning was affected by punishment, using
> a graded sequence of increasingly powerful electric shocks.
> What was Milgram actually trying to measure?
 
How likely subjects were to deliver shocks to other subjects.
 
> The other is a man, a crooner who lived 1912-2001. His last
> #1 song was in 1958, the year the Grammy awards started, and
> it did win one.
 
Katy Perry Como
 
> and has even won multiple Grammys in the same year, such as
> in 2009. And between them, for one week in the middle of 2015
> they had the #1 and #2 albums on the Billboard 200 chart.
 
James Taylor Swift
 
> career began in 1960; he became the first player on his team to
> have his number retired. The second began his career in 1970,
> the same year his team joined the NHL.
 
Rod Gilbert Perreault
 
> history. The second one played for 25 years with 9 different
> teams, and the Blue Jays are one of the teams he won a World
> Series with.
 
Branch Rickey Henderson
 
> is American and his nomination was for "Sideways", released
> in 2004. And they both go by three names, so your answer on
> this one will be 5 words long.
 
Pete Gayde
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Aug 21 06:44PM -0500

Mark Brader:
> and should be interpreted accordingly... For further information
> see my 2016-05-31 companion posting on "Questions from the Canadian
> Inquisition (QFTCI*)".
 
Due to travel, there will be a hiatus following the posting of
the next set.
 
 
> * Game 6, Round 2 - Science - Famous Experiments
 
For each question, ANY ONE of the words or phrase emphasized
*this way* in the answer shown -- or equivalent wording -- was
sufficient for your answer to be accepted.
 
> forth on an open flat-car while other musicians stood beside
> the tracks. Either tell whose "effect" was confirmed, or
> describe it.
 
The *Doppler* effect, named for Christian Doppler: the *sound changed
in pitch* according to the velocity of the train. 4 for Dan Blum,
Joshua, Calvin, Dan Tilque, Stephen, Björn, Bruce, Peter, Erland,
Marc, and Pete.
 
> or even backwards. Rutherford said it was "as if you fired a
> 15-inch shell at a piece of tissue paper and it came back and
> hit you" -- and he drew what historic conclusion?
 
That *most of an atom's mass is in a small part* with a positive
charge, i.e. that atoms *have a nucleus*. 4 for Dan Blum, Calvin,
Dan Tilque, Stephen, Peter, Erland, and Marc.
 
The students were Hans Geiger and Ernest Marsden. Geiger would
later invent the Geiger counter.
 
> color to the light -- until an experiment in about 1666 by Isaac
> Newton in Woolsthorpe, England. How did he use a second prism
> to settle this question?
 
He turned it to *face the other way* -- and instead of adding more
color, it *recombined the colors* to produce colorless white light.
4 for Dan Blum, Calvin, Dan Tilque, Stephen, Bruce, Peter, Erland,
and Marc.
 
> but there was no easy way to prove it until Léon Foucault's
> ["foo-KOH's"] simple experiment in 1851 in Paris. How did he
> use a large pendulum to provide this proof?
 
He suspended it so it would be free to swing in any direction, and
as the hours passed, it seemed to *swing in a different direction*
due to the Earth turning under it. 4 for Dan Blum, Joshua, Calvin,
Dan Tilque, Stephen, Björn, Bruce, Peter, and Marc.
 
> 5. In 1668 in Florence, Italy, Francesco Redi allowed meat to rot
> in a jar whose mouth was covered with a layer of gauze. Why?
 
To prove that rotting meat *did not spontaneously generate vermin*
such as maggots. (The gauze kept flies from laying eggs on the meat.)
4 for Dan Tilque, Stephen, Bruce, Peter, Marc, and Pete.
 
> the Leaning Tower of Pisa and dropped two balls to the ground.
> Whether he did it or not, what would this demonstration have
> proved?
 
That a lightweight ball would *fall just as fast* as a heavy one
(contrary to Aristotle's writings). 4 for Dan Blum, Joshua, Calvin,
Dan Tilque, Stephen, Björn, Bruce, Erland, Marc, and Pete.
 
> around its center, and he measured how much. Either name the
> specific thing that he was trying to find out, or give the
> picturesque three-word title he gave to his experiment.
 
He was measuring the *gravitational force (attraction)* between the
different weights. From this he could compute the *gravitational
constant* in Newton's equations, and in turn, both the *density of
the Earth* and finally the total *mass of the Earth*. So he called
the experiment *"Weighing the Earth"*. 4 for Dan Blum, Calvin,
Dan Tilque, Stephen, Björn, and Bruce.
 
> never happens in Alexandria. Based on the distance between
> the two places and some measurements he could make himself,
> what did he calculate?
 
The *circumference of the Earth* (also accepting its diameter,
or radius, or just its size). 4 for Dan Blum, Joshua, Dan Tilque,
Stephen, Björn, Bruce, Peter, Erland, and Marc. 3 for Calvin.
 
> hemisphere, they did not have the strength to pull them apart;
> but then he operated a control and the hemispheres fell apart
> on their own. What had kept them together?
 
*Air pressure*: he had *pumped the air out* from the sphere, creating
a near *vacuum* inside. 4 for Dan Blum, Calvin, Dan Tilque, Stephen,
Björn, Bruce, Peter, Erland, Marc, and Pete.
 
> were measuring how learning was affected by punishment, using
> a graded sequence of increasingly powerful electric shocks.
> What was Milgram actually trying to measure?
 
Their *obedience* to authority. (I did not accept answers that only
referred to the shock level they supposedly administered, although
of course that's what was actually tabulated.) 4 for Dan Blum,
Joshua, Calvin, Dan Tilque, Stephen, Bruce, Peter, Erland, and Marc.
 
Subjects were placed alone in a room with the experimenter and a
fake control panel with labels like "danger: severe shock", and
beyond that, "XXX". Through a window they saw the man supposedly
being shocked. As the experiment progressed, he he had a heart
condition, begged to be released, and finally appeared to collapse.
Given instructions like "the experiment requires that you continue,
it is absolutely essential", 26 out of 40 subjects, even while
feeling very concerned about the man, still went on to administer
the 30th and highest shock level.
 
 
> into the chamber with a microscope and adjusted the electrical
> voltage on a pair of metal plates until some of the drops
> stopped moving. What was he measuring?
 
The electric *charge on one electron*. Dan Tilque, Stephen, and Marc
got this.
 
The setup would charge each drop so slightly that he could
identify drops as missing just 1 electron, 2 electrons, etc.,
with all the charges a multiple of the same base amount.
 
> 12. In Cavendish's experiment in question 7, the rod only rotated
> by a tiny amount, so how did he amplify the motion so he could
> measure it accurately?
 
He fixed a mirror to the rod and reflected a beam of light off it.
Nobody got this.
 
 
> So, these two men -- one each from the two major parties --
> were prime ministers of Canada in the 19th century. They each
> were in office only once, 16 years apart.
 
Alexander Mackenzie Bowell. (1873-78, 1894-96.) 4 for Stephen.
 
And we promise no more Alexander Mackenzie questions this season.
 
> were both prime ministers of Canada after Pierre Trudeau retired.
> They were in office 10 years apart. Hint: this time there is
> a trick to the question.
 
Paul (Edgar Philippe) Martin (Brian) Mulroney. (2003-06,
1984-93.) Mulroney goes by his middle name.
 
> The other is a man, a crooner who lived 1912-2001. His last
> #1 song was in 1958, the year the Grammy awards started, and
> it did win one.
 
Katy Perry Como. ("I Kissed a Girl", "Catch A Falling Star".)
4 for Dan Blum, Jason, Joshua, Calvin, Stephen, Peter, Marc, and Pete.
 
> and has even won multiple Grammys in the same year, such as
> in 2009. And between them, for one week in the middle of 2015
> they had the #1 and #2 albums on the Billboard 200 chart.
 
James Taylor Swift. ("Before This World", "1989".) 4 for Dan Blum,
Joshua, Calvin, Stephen, Marc, and Pete.
 
> career began in 1960; he became the first player on his team to
> have his number retired. The second began his career in 1970,
> the same year his team joined the NHL.
 
Rod Gilbert ["zheel-BEAR"] Perreault. (New York Rangers, Buffalo
Sabres.) 4 for Stephen and Pete.
 
> history. The second one played for 25 years with 9 different
> teams, and the Blue Jays are one of the teams he won a World
> Series with.
 
Branch Rickey Henderson. (Branch Rickey was the man who "broke the
color bar" by hiring Jackie Robinson) 4 for Jason, Joshua, Stephen,
Marc, and Pete.
 
> The second, a modernist, was born in Dublin in 1882, moved to
> Zurich in 1904, and died there in 1941. They both wrote in
> English, or at least in something like English.
 
Henry James Joyce. 4 for Dan Blum, Joshua, Calvin, Dan Tilque,
Stephen, Peter, and Marc.
 
> in 1878 and died in 1968. The second was born in Sauk Center,
> Minnesota, in 1885; in 1930 he won the Nobel Prize for
> Literature; and he died in 1951.
 
Upton Sinclair Lewis. 4 for Joshua, Dan Tilque, Stephen, and Marc.
 
> won an Oscar for her supporting role in "Key Largo". The second,
> a man, was British and lived 1913-88; he never won an Oscar,
> but was nominated for "Sons and Lovers".
 
Claire Trevor Howard. 4 for Joshua and Stephen.
 
> is American and his nomination was for "Sideways", released
> in 2004. And they both go by three names, so your answer on
> this one will be 5 words long.
 
Kristin Scott Thomas Haden Church. (She was nominated for "The
English Patient".) 4 for Dan Blum, Joshua, and Stephen.
 
 
Scores, if there are no errors:
 
GAME 6 ROUNDS-> 2 3 TOTALS
TOPICS-> Sci Mis
Stephen Perry 40 36 76
Marc Dashevsky 36 20 56
Dan Blum 36 16 52
Dan Tilque 40 8 48
Joshua Kreitzer 20 28 48
"Calvin" 35 12 47
Peter Smyth 32 8 40
Bruce Bowler 36 0 36
Pete Gayde 16 16 32
Erland Sommarskog 28 0 28
Björn Lundin 24 0 24
Jason Kreitzer 0 8 8
 
--
Mark Brader, Short words good; sesquipedalian verbalizations undesirable
Toronto, msb@vex.net -- after George Orwell
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
Pete <pagrsg@wowway.com>: Aug 21 05:27PM

Calvin <334152@gmail.com> wrote in
 
> 1 Despite being only 26.6 seconds in length it is probably the
> most scrutinised piece of film of all time. What did Abraham Zapruder
> famously record?
 
Assassination of John Kennedy
 
> 2 Which (fictional) race of extra-terrestrial
> mutants hails from the planet Skaro?
 
Daleks
 
> 3 Which 1983 musical romantic
> comedy did Barbra Streisand direct, co-write, co- produce and star in?
 
Yentl
 
> 4 Marlee Matlin won a best actress Oscar for her role in which
> 1986 film?
 
Children of a Lesser God
 
> 5 Which American newspaper is sometimes known as the
> "old gray lady"?
 
New York Times
 
> 6 In what modern day country is Mount Ararat located?
 
Turkey
 
> 7 Which mathematical symbol was invented by Robert Record
> in the mid-16th century?
 
Infinity
 
> 8 Which six-letter word can mean a cross
> between a beagle and a pug, or a baby echidna or platypus?
> 9 A hoplite was a soldier in which ancient civilisation?
 
Persia
 
> 10 What is
> the three-word title of the 1957 book by Vance Packard which
> demystified the deliberately mysterious arts of advertising?
 
The Peter Principle
 
 
> cheers,
> calvin
 
Pete Gayde
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