Thursday, July 22, 2021

Digest for rec.games.trivia@googlegroups.com - 1 update in 1 topic

tool@panix.com (Dan Blum): Jul 21 11:24PM

> the British army major who founded it in 1853, a town where a
> certain Osama Bin Laden was living until his demise last week.
> Name that town.
 
Abbottabad
 
> 2. The leader of the Apache tribe asked the US president for a
> formal apology last week for the code name chosen by the
> government to refer to Osama Bin Laden. What code name?
 
Geronimo
 
 
> 3. Talk about a brother act. All three of these brothers """are"""
> catchers, and two """have""" won Gold Gloves. Two have also
> played for the Blue Jays. Give the family name.
 
Alou
 
> * Game 1, Round 3 - Art - Painting Parodies
 
> 1. Eug?ne Delacroix.
 
B
 
> 2. Henri Rousseau.
 
A
 
> 3. Jan van Eyck.
 
G
 
> 4. Raphael.
 
C
 
> 5. R.
 
Manet; Degas
 
> 6. Z.
 
Gainsborough
 
> 7. X.
 
Grant Wood
 
> 8. Y.
 
Vermeer
 
> 9. U.
 
Munch
 
> 10. Zber bs n znfuhc guna n cnebql, Q qenjf ba gur jbex bs gjb
> negvfgf. Bar vf <nafjre 5>; cyrnfr anzr gur bgure. (Vs lbh
> qvqa'g trg #5, V'yy npprcg rvgure anzr urer.)
 
Picasso
 
--
_______________________________________________________________________
Dan Blum tool@panix.com
"I wouldn't have believed it myself if I hadn't just made it up."
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Wednesday, July 21, 2021

Digest for rec.games.trivia@googlegroups.com - 3 updates in 1 topic

Erland Sommarskog <esquel@sommarskog.se>: Jul 20 10:56PM +0200

> the British army major who founded it in 1853, a town where a
> certain Osama Bin Laden was living until his demise last week.
> Name that town.
 
Abbottabad

 
> For the first 4 questions, we name the artist whose work is being
> parodied. You give the letter of the picture.
 
> 1. Eugène Delacroix.
 
B
 
> 2. Henri Rousseau.
 
J
 
> 3. Jan van Eyck.
 
G
 
> 4. Raphael.
 
N
 
> 5. R.
 
Renoir
 
> 7. X.
> 8. Y.
> 9. U.
 
Edvard Munch
Joshua Kreitzer <gromit82@hotmail.com>: Jul 21 04:30AM

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote in news:AcednZimJ-mU7Gv9nZ2dnUU7-
> the British army major who founded it in 1853, a town where a
> certain Osama Bin Laden was living until his demise last week.
> Name that town.
 
Abbottabad

> 2. The leader of the Apache tribe asked the US president for a
> formal apology last week for the code name chosen by the
> government to refer to Osama Bin Laden. What code name?
 
Geronimo

 
> 4. """Two fathers and sons have won""" Gold Gloves. Coincidentally,
> all four of these individuals share the initials B.B.
> Give either *surname*.
 
Bonds

> dozen apiece. One of them became, in 1971, the first recipient
> of an annual trophy for sportsmanship and humanitarianism that is
> named after the other. Name either of these outfielding greats.
 
Clemente
 
> the same team, winning 16 consecutive Gold Gloves along the way.
> They called him "the Human Vacuum Cleaner". What """is"""
> his real name?
 
Brooks Robinson

> first in 1982, the second in 1986. A hard partier, he became
> something of a celebrity, including some memorable appearances on
> "Seinfeld".
 
Hernandez
 
 
> For the first 4 questions, we name the artist whose work is being
> parodied. You give the letter of the picture.
 
> 1. Eugčne Delacroix.
 
B
 
> 2. Henri Rousseau.
 
A
 
> 3. Jan van Eyck.
 
I
 
> 4. Raphael.
 
C

> va gurve bja evtug. Ohg nf abar bs gur sbhe perngrq nal bs gur
> *cnvagvatf* orvat fcbbsrq, gurve anzrf jvyy abg svther nf nafjref.
 
> 5. R.
 
Manet
 
> 6. Z.
 
Gainsborough
 
> 7. X.
 
Wood
 
> 8. Y.
 
Rembrandt
 
> 9. U.
 
Munch

> 10. Zber bs n znfuhc guna n cnebql, Q qenjf ba gur jbex bs gjb
> negvfgf. Bar vf <nafjre 5>; cyrnfr anzr gur bgure. (Vs lbh
> qvqa'g trg #5, V'yy npprcg rvgure anzr urer.)
 
Picasso

> 11. S (sebz urer ba ner qrpblf).
 
Seurat
 
> 13. W.
 
Leonardo da Vinci
 
> 14. A.
 
Hopper

--
Joshua Kreitzer
gromit82@hotmail.com
Dan Tilque <dtilque@frontier.com>: Jul 21 02:21AM -0700

On 7/19/21 11:45 PM, Mark Brader wrote:
> the British army major who founded it in 1853, a town where a
> certain Osama Bin Laden was living until his demise last week.
> Name that town.
 
Abbottabad
 
 
> 2. The leader of the Apache tribe asked the US president for a
> formal apology last week for the code name chosen by the
> government to refer to Osama Bin Laden. What code name?
 
Geronimo
 
 
> 4. """Two fathers and sons have won""" Gold Gloves. Coincidentally,
> all four of these individuals share the initials B.B.
> Give either *surname*.
 
Bonds
 
> dozen apiece. One of them became, in 1971, the first recipient
> of an annual trophy for sportsmanship and humanitarianism that is
> named after the other. Name either of these outfielding greats.
 
Mays
 
> 2. Henri Rousseau.
> 3. Jan van Eyck.
> 4. Raphael.
 
C
 
 
> 5. R.
> 6. Z.
> 7. X.
 
Grant Woods
 
> 8. Y.
> 9. U.
 
Edvard Munch
 
 
--
Dan Tilque
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Tuesday, July 20, 2021

Digest for rec.games.trivia@googlegroups.com - 3 updates in 3 topics

msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Jul 20 01:45AM -0500

These questions were written to be asked in Toronto on 2011-05-09,
and should be interpreted accordingly. All questions were written
by members of the Misplaced Modifiers, but have been reformatted
and may have been retyped and/or edited by me. I will reveal the
correct answers in about 3 days.
 
For further information, including an explanation of the """ notation
that may appear in these rounds, see my recent companion posting on
"Reposted Questions from the Canadian Inquisition (RQFTCI*)".
 
 
* Game 1, Round 1 - Current Events (excerpt)
 
Answer these 2011 questions if you like for fun, but for no points.
 
1. There is a lovely little town north of Islamabad, named for
the British army major who founded it in 1853, a town where a
certain Osama Bin Laden was living until his demise last week.
Name that town.
 
2. The leader of the Apache tribe asked the US president for a
formal apology last week for the code name chosen by the
government to refer to Osama Bin Laden. What code name?
 
 
* Game 1, Round 2 - Sports - Gold-Glovers
 
The Rawlings Gold Glove Award has been presented since 1957 to the
players deemed to be the best at baseball's 9 fielding positions --
that is to say, the best defensive players. In its initial year,
only one award was made for each position for all of Major League
baseball. Since 1958, there """have been""" separate awards for
each position for the American and National Leagues. This round
asks about some celebrated Gold Glovers.
 
1. """No one has won""" more Gold Gloves than this pitcher, with
18 to his name. He """has""" the second-most wins of any pitcher
in modern (post-1920) baseball history, """is""" a 4-time Cy
Young award winner, and """wears""" a 1995 World Series ring.
Name him.
 
2. """Still active""", this catcher """leads all""" at his position
with 13 career Gold Gloves. He """has""" caught more games
than any catcher in history and was a member of the 2003 World
Series champions.
 
3. Talk about a brother act. All three of these brothers """are"""
catchers, and two """have""" won Gold Gloves. Two have also
played for the Blue Jays. Give the family name.
 
4. """Two fathers and sons have won""" Gold Gloves. Coincidentally,
all four of these individuals share the initials B.B.
Give either *surname*.
 
5. Two players """lead""" in career outfield Gold Gloves with a
dozen apiece. One of them became, in 1971, the first recipient
of an annual trophy for sportsmanship and humanitarianism that is
named after the other. Name either of these outfielding greats.
 
6. This third baseman played his entire career, 1955 to 1977, for
the same team, winning 16 consecutive Gold Gloves along the way.
They called him "the Human Vacuum Cleaner". What """is"""
his real name?
 
7. This first baseman reeled off 11 consecutive Gold Glove awards
for two teams. He won World Series rings with both teams, the
first in 1982, the second in 1986. A hard partier, he became
something of a celebrity, including some memorable appearances on
"Seinfeld".
 
8. This second baseman started his career in 1988 with the San
Diego Padres before moving on to better things. """Still"""
the all-time leader at his position with 10 Gold Gloves, he was
also a clutch hitter, with 4 Silver Slugger awards to his credit.
 
9. Aside from Roberto Alomar, """7 other players have won Gold
Gloves as Blue Jays""". The first two, in 1986, were a shortstop
and a right fielder. Name *either one*.
 
10. The """most recent""" Blue Jay infielder to win the award was a
second baseman who picked it up in 2005. Never a favorite of
Jays general manager J.P. Ricciardi, he was shipped off in
2006 and has gone on to snatch """three""" more Gold Gloves
with other teams.
 
 
* Game 1, Round 3 - Art - Painting Parodies
 
Please see: http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/msb/g1r3/parodies.jpg
 
For the first 4 questions, we name the artist whose work is being
parodied. You give the letter of the picture.
 
1. Eugčne Delacroix.
2. Henri Rousseau.
3. Jan van Eyck.
4. Raphael.
 
After finishing with #1-4, please decode the rot13 to see the
remaining questions #5-10, where we give a letter and you name
the artist parodied. And then if you like, for fun, but for no
points, go on to #11-14 (also in rot13), which were the decoys
on the original handout.
 
Abgr gung fbzr vzntrf hfr punenpgref perngrq ol Zngg Tebravat,
Wrna qr Oehaubss, Hqremb, naq Wvz Urafba -- bhgfgnaqvat negvfgf
va gurve bja evtug. Ohg nf abar bs gur sbhe perngrq nal bs gur
*cnvagvatf* orvat fcbbsrq, gurve anzrf jvyy abg svther nf nafjref.
 
5. R.
6. Z.
7. X.
8. Y.
9. U.
 
10. Zber bs n znfuhc guna n cnebql, Q qenjf ba gur jbex bs gjb
negvfgf. Bar vf <nafjre 5>; cyrnfr anzr gur bgure. (Vs lbh
qvqa'g trg #5, V'yy npprcg rvgure anzr urer.)
 
11. S (sebz urer ba ner qrpblf).
12. T.
13. W.
14. A.
 
--
Mark Brader, Toronto "Just to be clear, pythons
msb@vex.net do not have feet." --Tony Cooper
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Jul 20 01:35AM -0500

On 2020-06-07, I wrote:
> (sometimes with additional edits) that I posted previously.
> If you can remember the answers after that amount of time, when
> bully for you!
 
The first games that I reposted before were from seasons written
by the Usual Suspects, ending with one from 1998 that I previously
posted in 2009. As we neared the end of that season I was imagining
that the Inquisition might be able to resume play soon, but the
situation is somewhat complicated and there's been nothing decided
about a resumption yet.
 
So I'm going to continue reposting old rounds, now from seasons
written by other teams. But it turns out that I no longer have
access to the handouts for the next few seasons of old games that
I reposted after the ones from 1998, so I'm jumping ahead a bit
to the second season of 2011, written by the Misplaced Modifiers.
I previously posted that season in 2011 and 2012 under the tag
QFTCIMM, so this time it'll be RQFTCIMM11.
 
If the Canadian Inquisition resumes before I finish with that
season, then I'll return to posting new material from the league's
recent games.
 
 
* Out-of-Date Questions
 
(This section is repeated from the 2020-06-07 posting, with a few
trivial fixes.)

When reposting games I'll put R on the beginning of the previous
posting tag and an indication of the original year on the end if
it was not there already, e.g. RQFTCI06.
 
 
Of course it's also possible that for some questions the answers
have changed. My general rule in that case will be to accept
*either* the answer that was correct when the game was originally
played, *or* the current correct answer. If the answer has changed,
then you'll need to be aware that some subsidiary information
provided as hints within the original question may be out of date.
 
For example, if the original game date was 2006 and the question
was "What European city was the home of the most recent summer
Olympics?", then you could give the 2006 answer of Athens (2004)
or the 2020 answer of Rio de Janeiro (2016), even though Rio is
not a "European city".
 
In general with questions like this I'll try to call attention
to words that might be out of date, by marking them with triple
quotation marks. So the actual form of that question when reposted
would be something like: "What European city was the home of the
"""most recent""" summer Olympics?" And the peculiar punctuation
is your hint that the facts might have changed.
 
I said *might* be out of date, and *might* have changed, because
if you see that punctuation it doesn't mean that the answer *has*
changed. It might be that nothing has changed, or it might be
that a person referred to in the present tense has died, but the
answer is still the same; or anything like that. For example, if
the question was "Who """has had""" the most years in office as US
president?", Franklin Roosevelt would be the only possible answer.
When I post the answer in a case like that, I'll give the answer
and put something like "(still true)" or "(died in 2015)" after it.
 
For some questions I will use a different rule, such as requiring
the original answer, or requiring you to say which year you are
answering for, and in those cases I will include an explicit note.
 
 
* Procedures and Scoring
 
(This section is repeated from my regular QFTCI introductory
posting.)
 
The usual rule in our regular league games is that each question
goes to an individual who can answer for 2 points without
assistance, and if he misses, he can consult his team and try
again for 1 point. If the quizmaster judges that an answer is
incomplete, she can ask for more details before ruling the answer
right or wrong.
 
To maintain the spirit of these rules, I will say that you can
give two answers on every question. But I will penalize you if
you give both a right answer and a wrong answer. My scoring is:
 
4 points - if you answer once and are right (or twice, both right)
3 points - if you guess twice and are right only the first time
2 points - if you guess twice and are right only the second time
 
Bonus points may occasionally be available and will be explained in
the relevant round.
 
If you give only one answer, but with only some sort of additional
comment, please make it clear that that's what you're doing.
If there is any doubt I'll assume that you are giving two answers.
If I see more than two answers, the third and any later ones will
be ignored.
 
Although there is no rule like this in the Canadian Inquisition,
where it makes sense I will accept answers that I think are almost
close enough (*more than half right*), with a 1-point penalty.
 
But I will reject answers that I do not think are sufficiently
specific, since there is no opportunity to ask for clarification
when answers are posted in the newsgroup. If I anticipate the
possibility of insufficiently specific answers I will try to
provide guidance in a way that does not spoil the questions,
such as a note in rot13 to be read after you have answered.
 
You must, of course, answer based on your own knowledge and
nothing else. You must post all your answers in a single posting
(Except in case of technical difficulties, when emailed answers
or multiple postings will be accepted.)
 
Where a person's name is asked for, *normally you need only give
the surname*. If you do give another part of the name and you're
wrong, your answer is wrong.
 
--
Mark Brader | "I don't have to stay here to be insulted."
Toronto | "I realize that. You're insulted everywhere, I imagine."
msb@vex.net | -- Theodore Sturgeon
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
msb@vex.net (Mark Brader): Jul 20 01:31AM -0500

Mark Brader:
> and should be interpreted accordingly... For further information...
> see my 2020-06-23 companion posting on "Reposted Questions from
> the Canadian Inquisition (RQFTCI*)".
 
 
The Final game of this season is over and STEPHEN PERRY has sat
back and coasted to a big win. Hearty congratulations!
 
 
> I think I wrote one question in the literature round, and one
> triple in the challenge round.
 
In literature, I think question #14 was the only one from me.
In the challenge round it was triple E -- and, incidentally,
the original game was decided on the last one those questions,
when Forza Azzurri picked up 2 points to finish with 53, while
MI5 had 52 and On a Roll had 32.
 
 
 
> We will read two lines of a patriotic or idealistic national song.
> You continue the lyric for another two lines or until you get to the
> word that rhymes (or sort-of-rhymes) with the one where we left off.
 
I allowed one small mistake for free; two or three small ones or one
large one got you "almost correct"; more than that was wrong.
 
> 1. "The Maple Leaf Forever":
 
> In days of yore, from Britain's shore
> Wolfe the dauntless hero came
 
And planted firm Britannia's flag
On Canada's fair domain.
 
> 2. "America the Beautiful":
 
> O beautiful for spacious skies
> For amber waves of grain;
 
For purple mountain majesties
Above the fruited plain!
 
4 for Pete and Joshua. 3 for Dan Tilque.
 
> 3. Blake's "Milton", often called "Jerusalem":
 
> And did those feet in ancient times
> Walk upon England's mountains green?
 
And was the holy Lamb of God
In England's pleasant pastures seen?
 
4 for Erland and Dan Blum.
 
 
> * """Modern""" Pundits
 
> We give the names of three books; you name the author. All were
> published in the 1990s.
 
All of these authors are still alive.
 
> "Illiberal Education: The Politics of Race and Sex on Campus";
> "Ronald Reagan: How an Ordinary Man Became an Extraordinary
> Leader".
 
Dinesh D'Souza. 4 for Joshua.
 
> 5. "Fire with Fire: The New Female Power and How to Use It";
> "Promiscuities: The Secret Struggle for Womanhood"; "Women in
> the Material World" (co-author).
 
Naomi Wolf. 4 for Joshua.
 
> 6. "Sexual Personae: Art and Decadence from Nefertiti to Emily
> Dickinson"; "Vamps and Tramps: New Essays"; "Sex, Art, and
> American Culture".
 
Camille Paglia. 4 for Joshua and Dan Blum.
 
 
> Italian novel of modern times. It tells of two peasants who
> try to marry in spite of the opposition of the local landowner.
> Name the novel, in either Italian or English.
 
"I Promessi Sposi" ("The Betrothed").
 
> Tatyana, and years later suffers when Tatyana, now married
> to a great nobleman, in turn rejects him. Name it, in either
> Russian (in our alphabet, please; no Cyrillic) or English.
 
"Yevgeny Onegin" ("Eugene Onegin"). 4 for Joshua.
 
> Supposedly the novel inspired hundreds of young men to follow
> his example and kill themselves. Name it, in either German
> or English.
 
"Die Leiden des jungen Werthers" ("The Sorrows of Young Werther").
4 for Joshua and Dan Blum. 3 for Erland.
 
 
 
> 10. What philosopher wrote his "Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus" in
> 1919, then repudiated much of it in his later book "Philosophical
> Investigations"?
 
Ludwig Wittgenstein. 4 for Dan Blum.
 
Reading that he repudiated his own book reminds me of Leonard Nimoy's
two memoirs, "I Am Not Spock" (1975) and "I Am Spock" (1995).
 
> describe the categories of thought that we use to understand
> the world, and divides the world into things-in-themselves and
> things-as-we-perceive-them? Please give the title in English.
 
"Critique of Pure Reason". 4 for Dan Blum.
 
> the nature of love, in which he discusses the charming notion
> that men and women were once the joined halves of single
> bisexual beings?
 
"The Symposium".
 
 
> "Harper's", and other literary magazines; they are collected
> in such books as "Searoad" (1991) and "Unlocking the Air and
> Other Stories" (1996).
 
Ursula K. LeGuin. (She died in 2018.) 4 for Pete and Dan Blum.
 
> and science writing, wrote a novel called "Glide Path" in 1963,
> based on his experiences when involved with the development of
> radar-guided descent of aircraft in World War II.
 
1998 answer: Arthur C. Clarke. 2021 answer: Sir Arthur C. Clarke.
(He died in 2008.) 4 for Dan Tilque.
 
> his mainstream titles are "The Wasp Factory", "Complicity",
> and in 1997, "Song of Stone". His SF stories often deal with
> a galactic civilization called the Culture.
 
Iain M. Banks. (He died in 2013.) 4 for Dan Blum and Dan Tilque.
 
 
 
> * A. Famous Australians
 
> In what field of endeavor did the following Australians achieve fame?
 
> A1. Billy Hughes.
 
Politics. (Australia's first prime minister.)
 
> A2. Albert Namatjira.
 
Fine art (painting).
 
> A3. Stevie Wright.
 
Music. (Lead singer of the Easybeats.)
 
 
> following.
 
> B1. Which tool comes in three basic types: orbital, random
> orbital, and belt?
 
(Electric) sander. 4 for Pete, Joshua, and Dan Blum.
 
> B2. Single-pole, 3-way, and 4-way are types of what?
 
(Electrical) switches. 4 for Pete, Joshua, Dan Blum, and Dan Tilque.
 
You may remember from an earlier RQFTCI series that 3-way switches
are also called 2-way switches. They are also a type of single-pole
switch.
 
> B3. And pole barn, sinker, box, siding, and ring shank are
> types of what? Would it help if we told you that in the US
> their sizes are commonly designated in "pennies"?
 
Nails. 4 for Pete, Joshua, Dan Blum, and Dan Tilque.
 
 
> * C. Triples
 
> Name the third member of each set.
 
> C1. Shadrach, Abednego, and...
 
Meshach. 4 for Pete, Joshua, and Dan Blum.
 
They were cast into the fiery furnace in the Bible's book of Daniel.
 
> C2. Brahma, Vishnu, and...
 
Shiva. 4 for Erland, Joshua, Dan Blum, and Dan Tilque.
 
They're the Hindu trinity [Trimurthi]: Creator, Preserver, and
Destroyer.
 
> C3. Porthos, Athos, and...
 
Aramis. 4 for Pete, Joshua, Dan Blum, and Dan Tilque.
 
They were the title characters of "The Three Musketeers".
 
 
> husband had died from cancer. Days after asking her to
> marry him, he dumped her by demanding she leave a New Year's
> party she was hosting at her own home. Name her.
 
Lauren Bacall.
 
> D2. Name the woman who complained that Frank always wanted to
> sing to her before sex, and who is best remembered for her
> role opposite Sean Connery as James Bond.
 
Jill St. John. 4 for Pete and Joshua.
 
> D3. Frank's first wife was his high-school sweetheart.
> Given that she's usually remembered by the last name
> Sinatra, all we'll ask you for is her first name.
 
Nancy (same as their daughter's name). 4 for Joshua and Dan Blum.
 
 
> in the Final are not eligible. *Note*: Since play was interrupted
> during the first season of 2020, if giving the present-day answer
> you should answer for the last season of 2019.
 
These secondary prizes are now awarded separately in the league's two
divisions, the Torquemada and the Jaworski Division. Either winner
was acceptable if giving the present-day answer..
 
> E1. Which team won the Stinker prize """this season"""?
 
1998 answer: Misplaced Modifiers. 2019 answer: What She Said
(Torquemada), 5 Easy Pieces (Jaworski).
 
> E2. Which team won the Canadiana prize """this season"""?
 
1998 answer: No Mensa No. 2019 answer: Smith & Guessin' (T), Simple
Minds (J).
 
> E3. Which team won the Protest prize """this season"""?
 
1998 answer: Reach for the Tap. (No 2019 answer, as this prize has
been dropped.)
 
The prize was replaced by a Fewest Zeroes prize, which was won most
recently by What She Said (T) and Simple Minds (J).
 
 
Scores, if there are no errors:
 
FINAL ROUNDS-> 2 3 4 6 7 8 10 BEST
TOPICS-> His Sci Can Geo Spo Lit Cha FIVE
Stephen Perry 60 60 39 55 47 -- -- 261
Dan Blum 22 42 0 35 10 28 28 155
Dan Tilque 36 40 0 23 16 11 16 131
Joshua Kreitzer 20 16 2 30 19 24 32 125
Erland Sommarskog 12 24 0 40 7 7 4 90
Pete Gayde -- -- -- -- -- 8 24 32
 
--
Mark Brader "...but the past thousand years
Toronto, msb@vex.net have been atypical."
 
My text in this article is in the public domain.
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Monday, July 19, 2021

Digest for rec.games.trivia@googlegroups.com - 1 update in 1 topic

Dan Tilque <dtilque@frontier.com>: Jul 18 06:35PM -0700

On 7/16/21 9:46 PM, Mark Brader wrote:
 
> 2. "America the Beautiful":
 
> O beautiful for spacious skies
> For amber waves of grain;
 
for purple mountain's majesty
across the fruited plain
 
 
> 10. What philosopher wrote his "Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus" in
> 1919, then repudiated much of it in his later book "Philosophical
> Investigations"?
 
Russell
 
> "Harper's", and other literary magazines; they are collected
> in such books as "Searoad" (1991) and "Unlocking the Air and
> Other Stories" (1996).
 
Atwood ?
 
> and science writing, wrote a novel called "Glide Path" in 1963,
> based on his experiences when involved with the development of
> radar-guided descent of aircraft in World War II.
 
Arthur C Clarke
 
> his mainstream titles are "The Wasp Factory", "Complicity",
> and in 1997, "Song of Stone". His SF stories often deal with
> a galactic civilization called the Culture.
 
Iain M Banks
 
> following.
 
> B1. Which tool comes in three basic types: orbital, random
> orbital, and belt?
 
router
 
 
> B2. Single-pole, 3-way, and 4-way are types of what?
 
light switches
 
 
> B3. And pole barn, sinker, box, siding, and ring shank are
> types of what? Would it help if we told you that in the US
> their sizes are commonly designated in "pennies"?
 
nails
 
 
> Name the third member of each set.
 
> C1. Shadrach, Abednego, and...
> C2. Brahma, Vishnu, and...
 
Shiva
 
> C3. Porthos, Athos, and...
 
Aramis
 
 
--
Dan Tilque
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